connive vs scheme what difference

what is difference between connive and scheme

English

Etymology

From French conniver (to ignore and thus become complicit in wrongdoing), or directly from its etymon Latin connīvēre, cōnīvēre, third-person plural perfect active indicative of connīveō, cōnīveō (to close or screw up the eyes, blink, wink; to overlook, turn a blind eye, connive) (perhaps alluding to two persons involved in a scheme together winking to each other), from con- (prefix indicating a being or bringing together of several objects) + *nīvēre (related to nictō (to blink, wink), from Proto-Indo-European *kneygʷʰ- (to bend, droop)).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /kəˈnaɪv/
  • Rhymes: -aɪv
  • Hyphenation: con‧nive

Verb

connive (third-person singular simple present connives, present participle conniving, simple past and past participle connived)

  1. (intransitive) To secretly cooperate with other people in order to commit a crime or other wrongdoing; to collude, to conspire. [from mid 17th c.]
  2. (intransitive, botany, rare) Of parts of a plant: to be converging or in close contact; to be connivent.
  3. (intransitive, obsolete) Often followed by at: to pretend to be ignorant of something in order to escape blame; to ignore or overlook a fault deliberately.
    Synonyms: (rare) dissimulate, look the other way, shut one’s eyes, turn a blind eye, wink
  4. (intransitive, obsolete) To open and close the eyes rapidly; to wink.

Conjugation

Derived terms

Related terms

  • connivance
  • connivent
  • nictate

Translations

References


Latin

Verb

connīvē

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of connīveō


English

Etymology

From Medieval Latin schēma (figure, form), from Ancient Greek σχῆμα (skhêma, form, shape), from ἔχω (ékhō, I hold). Doublet of schema. Compare sketch.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /skiːm/
  • Rhymes: -iːm

Noun

scheme (plural schemes)

  1. A systematic plan of future action.
    • c. 1713, Jonathan Swift, Thoughts on Various Subjects
      The stoical scheme of supplying our wants by lopping off our desires, is like cutting off our feet when we want shoes.
  2. A plot or secret, devious plan.
  3. An orderly combination of related parts.
    • 1706, Francis Atterbury, A Sermon Preach’d in the Cathedral Church of St. Paul; at the Funeral of My. Tho. Bennett
      such a scheme of things as shall at once take in time and eternity
    • 1754, Jonathan Edwards, The Freedom of the Will
      arguments [] sufficient to support and demonstrate a whole scheme of moral philosophy
  4. A chart or diagram of a system or object.
    • April 29, 1694, Robert South, A Sermon Preached at Westminster Abbey
      to draw an exact scheme of Constantinople, or a map of France
  5. (mathematics) A mathematical structure that enlarges the notion of algebraic variety in several ways, such as taking account of multiplicities and allowing “varieties” defined over any commutative ring (e.g. Fermat curves over the integers).
  6. (Britain, chiefly Scotland) A council housing estate.
    • 2008, James Kelman, Kieron Smith, Boy, Penguin 2009, p. 101:
      It was all too dear. They all just put their prices up because it was out in the scheme.
  7. (rhetoric) An artful deviation from the ordinary arrangement of words.
  8. (astrology) A representation of the aspects of the celestial bodies for any moment or at a given event.
  9. (Internet) Part of a uniform resource identifier indicating the protocol or other purpose, such as http: or news:.
  10. (Britain, pensions) A portfolio of pension plans with related benefits comprising multiple independent members.

Usage notes

In the US, generally has devious connotations, while in the UK, frequently used as a neutral term for projects: “The road is closed due to a pavement-widening scheme.”

Synonyms

  • (a systematic plan of future action): blueprint

Derived terms

  • colour scheme
  • pilot scheme

Descendants

  • Malay: skim

Translations

Verb

scheme (third-person singular simple present schemes, present participle scheming, simple past and past participle schemed)

  1. (intransitive) To plot, or contrive a plan.
  2. (transitive) To plan; to contrive.
    • 1908, Bohemian Magazine (volume 15, page 381)
      He schemed a plot. He made use of the hotel’s stationery to write a letter.

Translations

References

  • Silva Rhetoricae

Anagrams

  • Meches

Hunsrik

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈʃeːmə/

Verb

scheme

  1. (reflexive) to be ashamed

Further reading

  • Online Hunsrik Dictionary

Middle Low German

Etymology

From Old Saxon skimo (shadow). Originally masculine.

Pronunciation

  • Stem vowel: ē¹
    • (originally) IPA(key): /skɪəmə/

Noun

scheme m or f

  1. A shadow, a shade; a darkness created by an object obstructing light
  2. A shadow, a shade; something which is barely perceptible or not physical
    …lose se van der walt der dusternisse unde van deme scheme des dodes. (” …free them from the power of darkness and the shadow of death.” )
  3. A shimmer; a soft or weak occurrence of light
  4. twilight; the lighting conditions at dusk and dawn
  5. A face mask
  6. aureola

Alternative forms

  • sceme

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