connote vs imply what difference

what is difference between connote and imply

English

Etymology

From Medieval Latin connotō (signify beyond literal meaning), from com- (together), + notō (mark).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /kəˈnəʊt/, /kɒˈnəʊt/
  • (US) IPA(key): /kəˈnoʊt/
  • Rhymes: -əʊt

Verb

connote (third-person singular simple present connotes, present participle connoting, simple past and past participle connoted)

  1. (transitive) To signify beyond its literal or principal meaning.
    Racism often connotes an underlying fear or ignorance.
  2. (transitive) To possess an inseparable related condition; to imply as a logical consequence.
    Poverty connotes hunger.
  3. (intransitive) To express without overt reference; to imply.
  4. (intransitive) To require as a logical predicate to consequence.

Synonyms

  • (possess an inseparable condition): entail, imply
  • (express without overt reference): entail, imply
  • (require as a logical predicate): predicate

Related terms

  • connotation
  • connotative
  • connotatively
  • connotive

Translations

See also

  • denote

Anagrams

  • contone

Asturian

Verb

connote

  1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive of connotar

French

Verb

connote

  1. inflection of connoter:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Spanish

Verb

connote

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of connotar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of connotar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of connotar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of connotar.


English

Etymology

From Middle English implien, emplien, borrowed from Old French emplier, from Latin implicare (to infold, involve), from in (in) + plicare (to fold). Doublet of employ and implicate.

Pronunciation

  • (General American, Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɪmˈplaɪ/
  • Rhymes: -aɪ
  • Hyphenation: im‧ply

Verb

imply (third-person singular simple present implies, present participle implying, simple past and past participle implied)

  1. (transitive, of a proposition) to have as a necessary consequence
  2. (transitive, of a person) to suggest by logical inference
  3. (transitive, of a person or proposition) to hint; to insinuate; to suggest tacitly and avoid a direct statement
  4. (archaic) to enfold, entangle.
Conjugation

Usage notes

  • This is a catenative verb that takes the gerund (-ing). See Appendix:English catenative verbs

Synonyms

  • (to have as a necessary consequence): entail
  • (to suggest tacitly): allude, hint, insinuate, suggest

Related terms

  • implicate
  • implication
  • implicative
  • implicit
  • implicitness
  • implision

Translations

See also

  • connotation
  • entail

Further reading

  • imply in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • imply in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial