conquest vs seduction what difference

what is difference between conquest and seduction

English

Etymology

From Middle English conquest, from Old French conqueste (French conquête).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈkɒŋkwɛst/, /ˈkɒŋkwəst/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈkɑnkwɛst/, /ˈkɑnkwəst/, /ˈkɑŋ-/

Noun

conquest (countable and uncountable, plural conquests)

  1. Victory gained through combat; the subjugation of an enemy.
  2. (figuratively, by extenstion) An act or instance of overcoming an obstacle.
    • 1843, William H. Prescott, The History of the Conquest of Mexico
      Three years sufficed for the conquest of the country.
  3. That which is conquered; possession gained by force, physical or moral.
  4. (obsolete, feudal law) The acquiring of property by other means than by inheritance; acquisition.
  5. (colloquial, figuratively) A person whose romantic affections one has gained, or with whom one has had sex.
  6. (video games) A competitive mode found in first-person shooter games in which competing teams (usually two) attempt to take over predetermined spawn points labeled by flags.

Derived terms

  • conquest sale
  • Norman Conquest

Translations

Verb

conquest (third-person singular simple present conquests, present participle conquesting, simple past and past participle conquested)

  1. (archaic) To conquer.
  2. (marketing) To compete with an established competitor by placing advertisements for one’s own products adjacent to editorial content relating to the competitor or by using terms and keywords for one’s own products that are currently associated with the competitor.

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • conqueste, quenqueste, conqwest, conqweste

Etymology

From Old French conqueste.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɔnˈkwɛst(ə)/

Noun

conquest (plural conquestes)

  1. A conquest or invasion; a forcible takeover.
  2. The act of attaining victory or winning.
  3. The spoils of war; the fruit of victory.
  4. William the Conqueror’s invasion of England.
  5. (rare) discord, battle, division

Descendants

  • English: conquest

References

  • “conquest(e, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-04-28.


English

Etymology

Borrowed from Middle French séduction, from Latin seductio, from sēdūcō.

Pronunciation

  • (UK, Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /sɪˈdʌk.ʃn̩/
  • (US, General American) IPA(key): /sɪˈdʌk.ʃn̩/

Noun

seduction (countable and uncountable, plural seductions)

  1. The act of seducing.
  2. (dated, law, in English common law) The felony of, as a man, inducing a previously chaste unmarried female to engage in sexual intercourse on a promise of marriage.

Derived terms

  • hypnoseduction
  • seduction theory

Related terms

  • seduce

Translations

Anagrams

  • eductions, suctioned

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