consider vs regard what difference

what is difference between consider and regard

English

Alternative forms

  • considre (archaic)

Etymology

From Middle English consideren, from Middle French considerer, from Latin considerare.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /kənˈsɪdə/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /kənˈsɪdɚ/, [kənˈsɪɾɚ]
  • Rhymes: -ɪdə(ɹ)

Verb

consider (third-person singular simple present considers, present participle considering, simple past and past participle considered)

  1. (transitive) To think about seriously.
    Synonyms: bethink, reflect (on); see also Thesaurus:ponder
  2. (intransitive) To think about something seriously or carefully: to deliberate.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:ponder
  3. (transitive) To think of doing.
    Synonyms: think of, bethink
  4. (ditransitive) To assign some quality to.
    Synonyms: deem, regard, think of; see also Thesaurus:deem
    • 1825, Thomas Macaulay, An Essay on John Milton
      Considered as plays, his works are absurd.
  5. (transitive) To look at attentively.
    Synonyms: regard, observe; see also Thesaurus:pay attention
  6. (transitive) To take up as an example.
  7. (transitive, parliamentary procedure) To debate (or dispose of) a motion.
    Synonyms: deliberate, bethink
  8. To have regard to; to take into view or account; to pay due attention to; to respect.
    Synonym: take into account
    • February 21, 1679, William Temple, letter to the Lord Treasurer
      England could grow into a posture of being more united at home, and more considered abroad.

Usage notes

  • In sense 3, this is a catenative verb that takes the gerund (-ing). See Appendix:English catenative verbs.

Related terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • considre, decorins

Romanian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [konˈsider]

Verb

consider

  1. first-person singular present indicative/subjunctive of considera


English

Alternative forms

  • regarde, reguard, reguarde (all obsolete)

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɹɪˈɡɑːd/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ɹɪˈɡɑɹd/
  • Hyphenation: re‧gard
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)d

Etymology 1

From Middle English regard, regarde, reguard, from Anglo-Norman reguard, from regarder, reguarder. Attested in Middle English starting around the mid 14th century. Compare guard, reward, guardian, and so on.

Noun

regard (countable and uncountable, plural regards)

  1. (countable) A steady look, a gaze. [from 15th c.]
    • 1982, Lawrence Durrell, Constance, Faber & Faber 2004 (Avignon Quintet), p. 750:
      He bathed in the memory of her blondness, of her warm blue regard, and the sentiment permeated his sensibility with tenderness made the more rich because its object was someone long since dead.
  2. One’s concern for another; esteem; relation, reference. [from 16th c.]
  3. (preceded by “in” or “with”) A particular aspect or detail; respect, sense. [from 16th c.]
    • 1842, Treuttel and Würtz, The Foreign Quarterly Review, page 144:
      This attempt will be made with every regard to the difficulty of the undertaking []
    • 1989, Leonard W. Poon, David C. Rubin, Barbara A. Wilson, Everyday Cognition in Adulthood and Late Life, Cambridge University Press, page 399:
      These problems were not traditional problems with realistic stimuli, but rather were realistic in every regard.
  4. (uncountable) The worth or estimation in which something or someone is held.
    Synonyms: esteem, repute
    He is held in great regard in Whitehall.
Derived terms
  • disregard
  • in regard
  • in regard of
  • in regard to
  • with regard to

Synonyms

  • consideration, onlook, respect

Antonyms

  • (concern for another): neglect

Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English regarden, from Old French regarder, reguarder. First attested in late Middle English, circa the early 15th century.

Verb

regard (third-person singular simple present regards, present participle regarding, simple past and past participle regarded)

  1. To look at; to observe. [from 16th c.]
  2. (transitive) To consider, look upon (something) in a given way etc. [from 16th c.]
    • , [Act V, scene iv]:
      Signior Leonato, truth it is good Signior, / Your neece regards me with an eye of fauour.
  3. (transitive, archaic) To take notice of, pay attention to. [from 16th c.]
  4. (transitive) To face toward.
  5. (transitive) To have to do with, to concern. [from 17th c.]
  6. (transitive, obsolete) To set store by (something), to hold (someone) in esteem; to consider to have value, to respect. [from 16th c.]
    • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Luke 18:2:
      Ther was a Iudge in a certayne cite which feared not god nether regarded man.
Derived terms
  • regardable
  • regarder
  • regardless
  • self-regarding
Synonyms
  • (to look at): See Thesaurus:look
  • (to consider): See Thesaurus:deem
  • (to take notice of): See Thesaurus:pay attention
Antonyms
  • ignore
  • neglect

Translations

Anagrams

  • Drager, Gerard, Grader, grader, red rag, redrag

French

Etymology

From Middle French regard, from Old French regard, from reguarder.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʁə.ɡaʁ/

Noun

regard m (plural regards)

  1. look, glance
  2. (uncountable) sight, gaze, eyes
    • 1885, Loreau, Heriette (trans.), L’Ami commun (Our Mutual Friend, Charles Dickens), Part IV, chapter 10:
  3. manhole

Derived terms

Related terms

  • regarder

Further reading

  • “regard” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • garder, Gérard

Old French

Alternative forms

  • regart, resgard, resgart, regarde

Noun

regard m (oblique plural regarz or regartz, nominative singular regarz or regartz, nominative plural regard)

  1. look; observance; watching (act, instance of looking at)

Descendants

  • Middle French: regard
    • Middle English: regard, regarde
      • English: regard

References

  • regard on the Anglo-Norman On-Line Hub

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