constantly vs forever what difference

what is difference between constantly and forever

English

Alternative forms

  • constantliel, constauntly (both obsolete)

Etymology

From constant +‎ -ly. Displaced native Old English singallīċe.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈkɒnstəntli/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈkɑnstəntli/

Adverb

constantly (comparative more constantly, superlative most constantly)

  1. (archaic) With steadfastness; with resolve; in loyalty, faithfully.
    • , I.iv.1:
      Agrippa and the rest of his weeping friends earnestly besought him [] not to offer violence unto himself, ‘with a settled resolution he desired again they would approve of his good intent, and not seek to dehort him from it’; and so constantly died.
  2. In a constant manner; occurring continuously; persistently.
  3. (frequency) Recurring regularly.
    I find that I am constantly reminding you to feed your pets.
  4. In an unchangeable or invariable manner; in every case.

Synonyms

  • (in a constant manner): ceaselessly, incessantly, nonstop; see also Thesaurus:continuously
  • (in an unchangeable or invariable manner): consistently, invariably, uniformly; See also Thesaurus:uniformly

Translations

References

  • constantly in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • constantly in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.


English

Alternative forms

  • for ever

Etymology

From Middle English for ever, for evere, equivalent to for +‎ ever.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /fəˈɹɛvə(ɹ)/
  • (US) IPA(key): /fəˈɹɛvɚ/, [fəˈɹɛvɚ], [fɚˈɛvɚ], [fɔɹˈɛvɚ]
  • Rhymes: -ɛvə(r)

Adverb

forever (not comparable)

  1. (duration) For all time, for all eternity; for a lifetime; for an infinite amount of time.
    I shall love you forever.
  2. (duration, colloquial, hyperbolic) For a very long time, a seeming eternity.
    • 1988, Anne Tyler, Breathing Lessons, Chapter 1
      She and Serena had been friends forever. Or nearly forever: forty-two years, beginning with Miss Kimmel’s first grade.
    We had to wait forever to get inside.
  3. (frequency) Constantly or frequently.
    You are forever nagging me.
    • 1912: Edgar Rice Burroughs, Tarzan of the Apes, Chapter 5
      Early in his boyhood he had learned to form ropes by twisting and tying long grasses together, and with these he was forever tripping Tublat or attempting to hang him from some overhanging branch.

Usage notes

  • In the United Kingdom and most of the Commonwealth, the spelling for ever may be used instead of forever for the senses “for all time” and “for a long time”. In Canada and the United States, generally only forever is used, regardless of sense.

Synonyms

  • always
  • continually
  • eternally
  • evermore
  • for good
  • forevermore
  • for ever more
  • forever and a day
  • incessantly
  • until Kingdom come
  • permanently

Derived terms

  • foreverness
  • foreverhood
  • forever home

Related terms

  • everlasting
  • every
  • everyday
  • never
  • nevermore
  • whatever
  • whenever
  • whoever

Translations

Noun

forever (plural forevers)

  1. An extremely long time.
    It took me forever to make up my mind.
    Don’t spend forever on the phone!
    • 2007, Ruth O’Callaghan, “Where acid has etched”
      In the airport, holiday lovers kiss, mouth forevers, the usual argot betrays you. Desire makes love dull.
  2. (colloquial) A mythical time in the infinite future that will never come.

Translations

Adjective

forever (not comparable)

  1. Permanent, lasting; constant, perpetual.

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