constitutional vs integral what difference

what is difference between constitutional and integral

English

Etymology

From constitution +‎ -al (suffix meaning ‘of or pertaining to’ forming adjectives). Constitution is derived from Middle English constitucioun, constitucion (edict, law, ordinance, regulation, rule, statute; body of laws or rules, or customs; body of fundamental principles; principle or rule (of science); creation) from Old French constitucion (modern French constitution), a learned borrowing from Latin cōnstitūtiō, cōnstitūtiōnem (character, constitution, disposition, nature; definition; point in dispute; order, regulation; arrangement, system), from cōnstituō (to establish, set up; to confirm; to decide, resolve) (from con- (prefix indicating a being or bringing together of several objects) + statuō (to set up, station; to establish; to determine, fix) (ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *steh₂- (to stand (up)))) + -tiō (suffix forming nouns relating to actions or the results of actions), -tiōnem (accusative singular of -tiō).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˌkɒnstɪˈtjuːʃ(ə)n(ə)l/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˌkɑnstɪˈt(j)uʃ(ə)n(ə)l/, /-stə-/
  • Hyphenation: con‧sti‧tu‧tion‧al

Adjective

constitutional (comparative more constitutional, superlative most constitutional)

  1. Belonging to, or inherent in, the constitution or structure of one’s body or mind.
  2. For the benefit of one’s constitution or health.
  3. Relating to the constitution or composition of something; essential, fundamental.
  4. (law)
    1. Relating to a legal or political constitution (the basic law of a nation or institution; the formal or informal system of primary principles and laws that regulates a government or other institution).
    2. In compliance with or valid under a legal or political constitution.
      Antonyms: anticonstitutional, nonconstitutional, unconstitutional
    3. (also politics) Of a monarch: having a purely ceremonial role, or possessing powers limited by a constitution rather than plenary or unlimited powers.

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Noun

constitutional (plural constitutionals)

  1. A walk that is taken regularly for good health and wellbeing.

Translations

References

Further reading

  • constitution on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • constitution (disambiguation) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia


English

Etymology

Borrowed from Middle French integral, from Medieval Latin integrālis, from Latin integer (entire); see integer.

Pronunciation

  • Noun
  • (UK) enPR: ĭnʹtĭ-grəl, IPA(key): /ˈɪntɪɡɹəl/
  • (US) enPR: ĭnʹtə-grəl, IPA(key): /ˈɪntəɡɹəl/
  • Adjective
Dictionaries give the same pronunciation as for the noun, but the adjective is often pronounced with the accent on the second syllable:
  • (UK, US) enPR: ĭn-tĕgʹrəl, IPA(key): /ɪnˈtɛɡɹəl/

Adjective

integral (comparative more integral, superlative most integral)

  1. Constituting a whole together with other parts or factors; not omittable or removable
    • Ceasing to do evil, and doing good, are the two great integral parts that complete this duty.
    Synonyms: immanent, inherent, necessary; see also Thesaurus:intrinsic
  2. (mathematics) Of, pertaining to, or being an integer.
  3. (mathematics) Relating to integration.
  4. (obsolete) Whole; undamaged.

Derived terms

Related terms

  • integer
  • integrity
  • integrous (very rare)

Translations

Noun

integral (plural integrals)

  1. (mathematics) A number, the limit of the sums computed in a process in which the domain of a function is divided into small subsets and a possibly nominal value of the function on each subset is multiplied by the measure of that subset, all these products then being summed.
  2. (mathematics) A definite integral, a limit of sums.
  3. (mathematics) Antiderivative
    Synonyms: antiderivative, indefinite integral,
    Antonym: derivative

Derived terms

Related terms

  • integer

Translations

Anagrams

  • Triangle, alerting, altering, relating, tanglier, teraglin, triangle

Catalan

Etymology

Borrowed from Medieval Latin integrālis, from Latin integer.

Adjective

integral (masculine and feminine plural integrals)

  1. integral

Middle French

Etymology

Borrowed from Medieval Latin integrālis, from Latin integer.

Adjective

integral m (feminine singular integrale, masculine plural integraux, feminine plural integrales)

  1. integral, necessary to the function of the whole
  2. whole; entire

Descendants

  • French: intégral

References

  • integral on Dictionnaire du Moyen Français (1330–1500) (in French)

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from Medieval Latin integrālis, from Latin integer (entire; untouched).

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: in‧te‧gral
  • Rhymes: -al, -aw

Adjective

integral m or f (plural integrais, comparable)

  1. integral; whole; entire
  2. (of food) whole (from which none of its constituents has been removed)

Quotations

For quotations using this term, see Citations:integral.

Synonyms

  • (whole): completo, íntegro, inteiro, intacto, total

Derived terms

  • integralmente

Noun

integral f or m (in variation) (plural integrais)

  1. (mathematics) integral (limits of sums)
  2. (mathematics) antiderivative
    Synonym: antiderivada

Quotations

For quotations using this term, see Citations:integral.

Related terms

Further reading

  • “integral” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.

Romanian

Etymology

Borrowed from French intégral, Medieval Latin integrālis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /in.teˈɡral/

Adjective

integral m or n (feminine singular integrală, masculine plural integrali, feminine and neuter plural integrale)

  1. integral
    Synonyms: întreg, complet

Declension

Related terms

  • integru

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from Medieval Latin integrālis, from Latin integer (entire).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /inteˈɡɾal/, [ĩn̪.t̪eˈɣ̞ɾal]

Adjective

integral (plural integrales)

  1. integral
  2. whole
  3. brown (rice)
  4. wholegrain

Derived terms

Related terms

  • íntegro

Noun

integral f (plural integrales)|integrales

  1. (mathematics) integral

Further reading

  • “integral” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

Swedish

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪntɛˈɡraːl/

Noun

integral c

  1. (mathematics) integral

Declension

Anagrams

  • triangel

Turkish

Etymology

Borrowed from French intégral.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [in.tɛɟ.ˈɾalʲ]

Noun

integral (definite accusative integrali, plural integraller)

  1. (mathematics) integral







    a


    b



    f
    (
    x
    )

    d
    x



    {\displaystyle \int _{a}^{b}\!f(x)\,dx\,}

Declension

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