construe vs see what difference

what is difference between construe and see

English

Alternative forms

  • conster (obsolete)

Etymology

Borrowed from Late Latin construo, construere (to relate grammatically), from Latin construo (pile together); doublet of construct.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kənˈstɹuː/
  • (obsolete) IPA(key): /ˈkɒnstəɹ/

Noun

construe (plural construes)

  1. A translation.
  2. An interpretation.

Related terms

Translations

Verb

construe (third-person singular simple present construes, present participle construing, simple past and past participle construed)

  1. (transitive) To interpret or explain the meaning of something.
  2. (grammar, transitive) To analyze the grammatical structure of a clause or sentence; to parse.
    • Thus, in a sentence such as:
      (113)      John considers [S Fred to be too sure of himself]
      the italicised Reflexive himself can only be construed with Fred, not with John: this follows from our assumption that non-subject Reflexives must have an antecedent within their own S. Notice, however, that in a sentence such as:
      (114)      John seems to me [S — to have perjured himself]
      himself must be construed with John.
  3. (grammar, ergative) To admit of grammatical analysis.
  4. (transitive) To translate.
  5. To infer.

Derived terms

  • construction
  • misconstrue

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • Counters, Cutrones, cornutes, counters, countres, recounts, trounces

Latin

Verb

cōnstrue

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of cōnstruō


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: , IPA(key): /siː/
  • Rhymes: -iː
  • Homophones: C, cee, sea, Seay

Etymology 1

From Middle English seen, from Old English sēon (to see, look, behold, perceive, observe, discern, understand, know), from Proto-West Germanic *sehwan, from Proto-Germanic *sehwaną (to see), from Proto-Indo-European *sekʷ- (to see, notice).

Verb

see (third-person singular simple present sees, present participle seeing, simple past saw or (dialectal) seen or (dialectal) seent or (dialectal) seed, past participle seen or (dialectal) seent or (dialectal) seed or (dialectal) saw)

  1. (transitive) To perceive or detect someone or something with the eyes, or as if by sight.
    • 2016, VOA Learning English (public domain)
      I want to see this house!

    1. To witness or observe by personal experience.
      Hyponyms: experience, suffer
    2. To watch (a movie) at a cinema, or a show on television etc.
  2. To form a mental picture of.
    1. (figuratively) To understand.
    2. To come to a realization of having been mistaken or misled.
    3. (transitive) To foresee, predict, or prophesy.
    4. (used in the imperative) Used to emphasise a proposition.
  3. (social) To meet, to visit.
    1. To have an interview with; especially, to make a call upon; to visit.
    2. To date frequently.
    3. To visit for a medical appointment.
  4. (transitive; ergative) To be the setting or time of.
  5. (by extension) To ensure that something happens, especially while witnessing it.
  6. (transitive) To wait upon; attend, escort.
  7. (gambling, transitive) To respond to another player’s bet with a bet of equal value.
  8. To determine by trial or experiment; to find out (if or whether).
  9. (used in the imperative) To reference or to study for further details.
  10. To examine something closely, or to utilize something, often as a temporary alternative.
  11. To include as one of something’s experiences.
Inflection
Synonyms
  • (perceive with the eyes): behold, descry, espy, observe, view
  • (understand): follow, get, understand
  • (date frequently): go out; see also Thesaurus:date
Derived terms
Translations

Interjection

see

  1. Introducing an explanation
    Synonyms: look, well, so
Translations

See also

  • look
  • sight
  • watch

Etymology 2

From Middle English se, see, from Old French sie (seat, throne; town, capital; episcopal see), from Latin sedes (seat), referring to the bishop’s throne or chair (compare seat of power) in the cathedral; related to the Latin verb sedere (to sit).

Noun

see (plural sees)

  1. a diocese, archdiocese; a region of a church, generally headed by a bishop, especially an archbishop.
  2. The office of a bishop or archbishop; bishopric or archbishopric
  3. A seat; a site; a place where sovereign power is exercised.
Related terms
Derived terms
  • Holy See
Translations

See also

  • cathedra
  • cathedral
  • chair
  • throne

Further reading

  • see on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • -ese, ESE, Ese, ees, ese

Afrikaans

Alternative forms

  • (obsolete)

Etymology

From Dutch zee, from Middle Dutch sêe, from Old Dutch sēo, from Proto-Germanic *saiwiz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɪə/

Noun

see (plural seë)

  1. sea

Derived terms

  • seekoei
  • seesout
  • seevis
  • seevoël
  • seewater

Estonian

Etymology

From Proto-Finnic *se, ultimately from Proto-Uralic *śe. cognate to Finnish se, Votic se, Erzya се (se, this, that), Khanty си (si, that over yonder; now, then), and Nganasan [script needed] (sete, he, she).

Pronoun

see (genitive selle, partitive seda)

  1. this
  2. it
  3. (colloquial, somewhat rude) he, she (usually only used when said person is not present)

Declension

See also


Finnish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈseː/, [ˈs̠e̞ː]
  • Rhymes: -eː
  • Syllabification: see

Etymology 1

Compare Swedish ce, English cee, both ultimately from Latin with the c sound changed from a /k/ to a /s/ as is a common change in languages using the Latin alphabet.

Alternative forms

  • cee

Noun

see

  1. cee (The name of the Latin-script letter C.)
Usage notes
  • Speakers often use the corresponding forms of c-kirjain (“letter C, letter c”) instead of inflecting this word, especially in plural. The plural forms may get confused with sei (saithe).
Declension
Synonyms
  • c-kirjain

Etymology 2

< seitsemän

Numeral

see

  1. (colloquial, counting) seven

See also

  • seitsemän (seven)

Etymology 3

From Proto-Finnic *se. Compare Estonian see.

Pronoun

see

  1. (dialectal, rare, Southwest) Synonym of se.

Anagrams

  • ees

Friulian

Alternative forms

  • siee

Etymology

From the verb seâ. Compare Italian sega, Venetian siega, French scie.

Noun

see f (plural seis)

  1. saw

Middle Dutch

Etymology

From Old Dutch sēo, from Proto-Germanic *saiwiz.

Noun

sêe f or m

  1. sea

Inflection

Descendants

  • Dutch: zee f
    • Afrikaans: see
    • Berbice Creole Dutch: sei
    • Javindo: see
    • Negerhollands: see
    • Saramaccan:
    • Sranan Tongo: se
  • Limburgish: zieë f
  • West Flemish: zji m or f, zêe

Further reading

  • “see”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “see (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN, page I

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English .

Alternative forms

  • se, , ce, sea, sei, ze

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɛː/, /seː/
  • Rhymes: -ɛː

Noun

see (plural sees)

  1. sea, ocean
  2. A body of water, a lake
Related terms
  • Rede See
Descendants
  • English: sea
  • Scots: se, see, sey, seye, sie
  • Yola: zea, zee
References
  • “sē, n.(1).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-04-09.

Etymology 2

From Old French sei, from Latin sedes.

Alternative forms

  • se, ce, cee

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /seː/
  • Rhymes: -eː

Noun

see (plural sees)

  1. seat, chair
  2. dwelling, residence
  3. A royal or episcopal chair
  4. A royal or episcopal polity or realm
  5. A royal or episcopal residence
  6. (Christianity) The Kingdom of Heaven.
Descendants
  • English: see
References
  • “sē, n.(2).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-04-09.

North Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian , from Proto-West Germanic *saiwi. Cognates include Dutch zee.

Noun

see m (plural seen)

  1. (Föhr-Amrum) lake

Scots

Alternative forms

  • sie, sey, sei

Etymology

From Middle English seen, from Old English sēon, from Proto-West Germanic *sehwan. Cognate with English see.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈsi]
  • (Coast Scots) IPA(key): [ˈsəi̯]

Verb

see (third-person singular present sees, present participle seein, past saw, seed, past participle seen)

  1. to see

References


Tetum

Verb

see

  1. to turn, to present

West Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian , from Proto-West Germanic *saiwi.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /seː/

Noun

see c (plural seeën, diminutive seeke)

  1. sea

Derived terms

  • seehûn
  • seeko
  • seerôver

Further reading

  • “see”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

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