consume vs exhaust what difference

what is difference between consume and exhaust

English

Etymology

From Middle English consumen, from Old French consumer, from Latin cōnsūmere.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, UK, General Australian) IPA(key): /kənˈsjuːm/
  • (UK, General Australian) IPA(key): /kənˈʃuːm/
  • (US) enPR: kən-so͞om, IPA(key): /kənˈsum/

Verb

consume (third-person singular simple present consumes, present participle consuming, simple past and past participle consumed)

  1. (transitive) To use up.
    The power plant consumes 30 tons of coal per hour.
  2. (transitive) To eat.
    Baby birds consume their own weight in food each day.
  3. (transitive) To completely occupy the thoughts or attention of.
    Desire consumed him.
  4. (transitive) To destroy completely.
    The building was consumed by fire.
  5. (intransitive, obsolete) To waste away slowly.
    • 1748, Samuel Richardson, Clarissa, Letter 441:
      But, sir, you see how weak I am. You must see that I have been consuming from day to day [] .
    • 1899, Kate Chopin, The Awakening:
      He assured her the child was consuming at that moment in the next room.
  6. (economics, transitive, intransitive) To trade money for good or services as an individual.
    In a materialistic society, individuals are taught to consume, consume, consume.
    If you consume this product while in Japan, you may be subject to consumption tax.
  7. (transitive) To absorb information, especially through the mass media.
    The Internet has changed the way we consume news.

Synonyms

  • (use): burn (of energy), use, use up
  • (eat): devour, eat, swallow
  • (occupy): occupy, overcome, take over
  • (destroy): annihilate, destroy, devastate, eliminate, obliterate, raze (of a building), wipe out

Derived terms

  • consumer

Related terms

  • consumption
  • consumptive

Translations

Anagrams

  • Mounces, comunes, muscone

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɔ̃.sym/

Verb

consume

  1. first-person singular present indicative of consumer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of consumer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of consumer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of consumer
  5. second-person singular imperative of consumer

Anagrams

  • écumons

Galician

Verb

consume

  1. second-person singular imperative of consumir

Latin

Verb

cōnsūme

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of cōnsūmō

Portuguese

Verb

consume

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of consumar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of consumar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of consumar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of consumar

Spanish

Verb

consume

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of consumir.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of consumir.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of consumir.

Verb

consume

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of consumar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of consumar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of consumar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of consumar.


English

Etymology

From Latin exhaustus, past participle of exhaurīre (to draw out, drink up, empty, exhaust), from ex (out) + haurīre (to draw (especially water), drain).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪɡˈzɔːst/
  • Rhymes: -ɔːst

Verb

exhaust (third-person singular simple present exhausts, present participle exhausting, simple past and past participle exhausted)

  1. (transitive) To draw or let out wholly; to drain off completely
  2. (transitive) To empty by drawing or letting out the contents
  3. (transitive, figuratively) To drain; to use up or expend wholly, or until the supply comes to an end
  4. (transitive) to tire out; to wear out; to cause to be without any energy
  5. (transitive) To bring out or develop completely
  6. (transitive) to discuss thoroughly or completely
  7. (transitive, chemistry) To subject to the action of various solvents in order to remove all soluble substances or extractives

Synonyms

  • spend, consume
  • tire out, weary
  • See also Thesaurus:fatigue

Related terms

  • exhausted
  • exhausting
  • exhaustion
  • exhaustive
  • exhaustible

Translations

Noun

exhaust (plural exhausts)

  1. A system consisting of the parts of an engine through which burned gases or steam are discharged; see also exhaust system.
  2. The steam let out of a cylinder after it has done its work there.
  3. The dirty air let out of a room through a register or pipe provided for the purpose.
  4. An exhaust pipe, especially on a motor vehicle.
  5. exhaust gas.

Derived terms

Translations

Descendants

  • Gulf Arabic: اقزوز(igzōz)
  • Hebrew: אֶגְזוֹז(egzóz)
  • Persian: اگزوز

Adjective

exhaust (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) Exhausted; used up.

Further reading

  • exhaust in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • exhaust in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • exhaust at OneLook Dictionary Search

Catalan

Etymology

From Latin exhaustus.

Adjective

exhaust (feminine exhausta, masculine plural exhausts or exhaustos, feminine plural exhaustes)

  1. out of (no longer in possession of)
  2. exhausted

Related terms

  • exhaurir
  • exhaustió
  • exhaustiu

Further reading

  • “exhaust” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “exhaust” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “exhaust” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “exhaust” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

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