contemplate vs muse what difference

what is difference between contemplate and muse

English

Etymology

Attested since the 1590s; borrowed from Latin contemplātus, from contemplari (observe, survey).

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈkɑn.təmˌpleɪt/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈkɒn.təmˌpleɪt/
  • Hyphenation: con‧tem‧plate

Verb

contemplate (third-person singular simple present contemplates, present participle contemplating, simple past and past participle contemplated)

  1. To look at on all sides or in all its aspects; to view or consider with continued attention; to regard with deliberate care; to meditate on; to study, ponder, or consider.
  2. To consider as a possibility.
    • 1793 February 18, Alexander Hamilton, Loans, speech given to the United States House of Representatives:
      There remain some particulars to complete the information contemplated by those resolutions.
    • 1826, James Kent, Commentaries on American Law
      If a treaty contains any stipulations which contemplate a state of future war.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:ponder
  • (look at): examine

Derived terms

  • contemplative

Related terms

  • contemplation

Translations

References

  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “contemplate”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Italian

Verb

contemplate

  1. inflection of contemplare:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative
  2. feminine plural of contemplato

Anagrams

  • completante

Latin

Participle

contemplāte

  1. vocative masculine singular of contemplātus


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: myo͞oz
    • (UK) IPA(key): /mjuːz/
    • (US) IPA(key): /mjuz/
  • Homophones: mews, Meuse
  • Rhymes: -uːz

Etymology 1

From Middle French muse, from Latin Mūsa, from Ancient Greek Μοῦσα (Moûsa).

Noun

muse (plural muses)

  1. A source of inspiration.
  2. (archaic) A poet; a bard.
    • 1609, William Shakespeare, Sonnet 85:
      My toung-tide Muſe in manners holds her ſtill,
      While comments of your praiſe richly compil’d,
      Reſerue their Character with goulden quill,
      And precious phraſe by all the Muſes fil’d.
Synonyms
  • (source of inspiration): Pierian spring
Related terms
  • museum
  • music
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English musen, from Old French muser.

Verb

muse (third-person singular simple present muses, present participle musing, simple past and past participle mused)

  1. (intransitive) To become lost in thought, to ponder.
  2. (transitive) To say (something) with due consideration or thought.
    • For quotations using this term, see Citations:muse.
  3. (transitive) To think on; to meditate on.
    • c. 1726, James Thomson, Hymn
      Come, then, expressive Silence, muse his praise.
  4. (transitive) To wonder at.
Synonyms
  • See also Thesaurus:ponder
Related terms
  • muser
  • musing
  • amuse
Translations

Noun

muse (plural muses)

  1. An act of musing; a period of thoughtfulness.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, I.xii:
      still he sate long time astonished / As in great muse, ne word to creature spake.
    • 1978, Lawrence Durrell, Livia, Faber & Faber 1992 (Avignon Quintet), p. 416:
      He fell into a muse and pulled his upper lip.

Etymology 3

From French musse. See muset.

Noun

muse (plural muses)

  1. A gap or hole in a hedge, fence, etc. through which a wild animal is accustomed to pass; a muset.
    Find a hare without a muse. (old proverb)

Anagrams

  • Semu, emus, umes

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /myz/
  • Homophones: musent, muses

Noun

muse f (plural muses)

  1. artistic inspiration
  2. muse (specific artistic subject)

Verb

muse

  1. first-person singular present indicative of muser
  2. third-person singular present indicative of muser
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of muser
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of muser
  5. second-person singular imperative of muser

Anagrams

  • émus, meus, mues, seum

Italian

Noun

muse f

  1. plural of musa

Anagrams

  • sume

Middle English

Etymology 1

Noun

muse

  1. Alternative form of mous

Etymology 2

Noun

muse

  1. Alternative form of Muse

Etymology 3

Verb

muse

  1. Alternative form of musen

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From French musée, from Latin mūsēum, from Ancient Greek Μουσεῖον (Mouseîon)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mʉ.seː/, [mʉʷ.ˈseː]

Noun

muse n (definite singular museet, indefinite plural muse or museer, definite plural museene or musea)

  1. Alternative form of musé

References

  • “muse” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

From Ancient Greek Μοῦσα (Moûsa).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /²mʉː.sə/ (example of pronunciation)

Noun

muse f (definite singular musa, indefinite plural muser, definite plural musene)

  1. a muse

Etymology 2

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /²mʉː.sə/ (example of pronunciation)

Verb

muse (present tense musar, past tense musa, past participle musa, passive infinitive musast, present participle musande, imperative mus)

  1. to whisper
    Synonym: kviskre

Etymology 3

From French musée, from Latin mūsēum, from Ancient Greek Μουσεῖον (Mouseîon)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mʉ.seː/, [mʉʷ.ˈseː] (examples of pronunciation)

Noun

muse n (definite singular museet, indefinite plural muse, definite plural musea)

  1. alternative spelling of musé

References

  • “muse” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Spanish

Verb

muse

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of musirse.
  2. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of musirse.

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