contend vs vie what difference

what is difference between contend and vie

English

Etymology

From Middle English contenden, borrowed from Old French contendre, from Latin contendere (to stretch out, extend, strive after, contend), from com- (together) + tendere (to stretch); see tend, and compare attend, extend, intend, subtend.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kənˈtɛnd/
  • Rhymes: -ɛnd

Verb

contend (third-person singular simple present contends, present participle contending, simple past and past participle contended)

  1. (intransitive) To be in opposition; to contest; to dispute; to vie; to quarrel; to fight.
    • 2011, Osaiah “Ike” Wilson III, ‎James J.F. Forrest, Handbook of Defence Politics
      the armies of Syria and Lebanon lack the capability to contend with the Israeli army, as demonstrated during the course of the First Lebanon War.
  2. (intransitive) To struggle or exert oneself to obtain or retain possession of, or to defend.
    • 17th century, John Dryden, Epistle III to the Lady Castlemain
      You sit above, and see vain men below / Contend for what you only can bestow.
    • 2020, C. Matthew McMahon, ‎Therese B. McMahon, 5 Marks of Christian Resolve
      God has entrusted something to the church, and it is the church’s job to contend for it, even unto death
  3. (intransitive) To be in debate; to engage in discussion; to dispute; to argue.
    • 1667, Richard Allestree, The Causes of the Decay of Christian Piety
      many of those things he so fiercely contended about , were either falle or trivial
  4. (intransitive) To believe (something is reasonable) and argue (for it); to advocate.
    • 1996, Michael Adler, ‎Erio Ziglio, Gazing Into the Oracle []
      Some panellists contended that the costs of research and care justified the establishment of a permanent national commission

Synonyms

  • (strive in opposition): fight, combat, vie, oppose
  • (struggle): struggle, strive, emulate (rare)
  • (strive in debate): contest, litigate, dispute, debate
  • (believe and argue): assert, aver

Related terms

  • contender
  • contention
  • contentious

Translations

Further reading

  • contend in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • contend in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.


English

Etymology

Aphetic form of envy.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /vaɪ/
  • Rhymes: -aɪ

Verb

vie (third-person singular simple present vies, present participle vying, simple past and past participle vied)

  1. (intransitive) To fight for superiority; to contend; to compete eagerly so as to gain something.
    • It is the tradition of a trading nation [] , that the younger sons [] may be placed in such a way of life as [] to vie with the best of their family.
  2. (transitive, archaic) To rival (something), etc.
    • 1608, William Shakespeare, Antony and Cleopatra [1]
      But, if there be, or ever were, one such, / It’s past the size of dreaming: nature wants stuff / To vie strange forms with fancy; yet, to imagine / An Antony, were nature’s piece ‘gainst fancy, / Condemning shadows quite.
  3. (transitive) To do or produce in emulation, competition, or rivalry; to put in competition; to bandy.
    • 1633, George Herbert, The Sacrifice
      And vying malice with my gentleness, / Pick quarrels with their only happiness.
  4. To stake; to wager.
    • Out, thou camelion harlot! now thine eyes Vie tears with the hyæna
  5. To stake a sum of money upon a hand of cards, as in the old game of gleek. See revie.

Synonyms

  • battle
  • compete
  • oppose

Antonyms

  • concede
  • reconcile

Translations

Noun

vie (plural vies)

  1. (obsolete) A contest.

Anagrams

  • -ive, I’ve, VEI

Bourguignon

Etymology

From Latin vita.

Noun

vie f (plural vies)

  1. life

Finnish

Etymology 1

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈʋie̯/, [ˈʋie̞̯]
  • Rhymes: -ie
  • Syllabification: vie

Verb

vie

  1. Third-person singular indicative present form of viedä.

Etymology 2

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈʋie̯ˣ/, [ˈʋie̞̯(ʔ)]
  • Rhymes: -ie
  • Syllabification: vie

Verb

vie

  1. Indicative present connegative form of viedä.
  2. Second-person singular imperative present form of viedä.
  3. Second-person singular imperative present connegative form of viedä.

Anagrams

  • vei

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /vi/
  • Homophones: vies, vis, vit

Etymology 1

From Old French vie, from older Old French viḍe, from Vulgar Latin vītam, from Latin vīta, from Proto-Italic *gʷītā.

Noun

vie f (countable and uncountable, plural vies)

  1. life, the state of organisms (organic beings) prior to death
  2. life, period in which one is alive, between birth and death
  3. biography, life
  4. life, lifeforms
  5. cost of living

Derived terms
Descendants
  • Antillean Creole: vi
  • Guianese Creole: lavi
  • Haitian Creole: lavi
  • Louisiana Creole French: vi
  • Seychellois Creole: lavi

Etymology 2

Ultimately from Latin via. Compare voie.

Noun

vie f (plural vies)

  1. (Switzerland, Jura) way, path (road, railway, etc)
Related terms
  • vionnet (Switzerland, rare)

Further reading

  • “vie” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Italian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈvi.e/

Noun

vie f

  1. plural of via

Anagrams

  • -evi, evi

Latin

Verb

viē

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of vieō

Manx

Adjective

vie

  1. Lenited form of mie.

Mutation

References

  • Mark Abley, Spoken Here: Travels Among Threatened Languages (2003)

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse vígja, from Proto-Germanic *wīhijaną.

Verb

vie (imperative vi, present tense vier, simple past vigde or vidde or via or viet, past participle vigd or vidd or via or viet)

  1. dedicate something to someone or towards a cause
  2. wed two persons into marriage

Derived terms

  • innvie
  • vielse
  • vievann

References

  • “vie” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Verb

vie (present tense vier, past tense vigde, supine vigd or vigt, past participle vigd, present participle viande, imperative vi)

  1. alternative form of via

Old French

Etymology

From Latin vīta.

Noun

vie f (oblique plural vies, nominative singular vie, nominative plural vies)

  1. life

Descendants

  • Middle French: vie
    • French: vie
      • Antillean Creole: vi
      • Guianese Creole: lavi
      • Haitian Creole: lavi
      • Louisiana Creole French: vi
      • Seychellois Creole: lavi
    • Norman: vie (Guernésiais)
  • Walloon: veye, vèie

Picard

Etymology

From Latin vita.

Noun

vie f (plural vies)

  1. life

Romanian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈvi.e/

Etymology 1

From Latin vīnea.

Noun

vie f (plural vii)

  1. vineyard
  2. vine
Declension
Synonyms
  • (vine): viță
Derived terms
  • viță de vie
Related terms
  • vier

Etymology 2

Forms of the adjective viu.

Adjective

vie

  1. nominative feminine singular of viu
  2. accusative feminine singular of viu

Slovak

Verb

vie

  1. third-person singular present of vedieť

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