continue vs preserve what difference

what is difference between continue and preserve

English

Etymology

From Middle English continuen, from Old French continuer, from Latin continuāre. Displaced native Old English þurhwunian.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: kən-tĭnʹyo͞o, IPA(key): /kənˈtɪnjuː/
  • Rhymes: -uː

Verb

continue (third-person singular simple present continues, present participle continuing, simple past and past participle continued)

  1. (transitive) To proceed with (doing an activity); to prolong (an activity).
  2. (transitive) To make last; to prolong.
    • , New York, 2001, p.74:
      Can you account him wise or discreet that would willingly have his health, and yet will do nothing that should procure or continue it?
  3. (transitive) To retain (someone or something) in a given state, position, etc.
    • 2002, Colin Jones, The Great Nation, Penguin 2003, p.257:
      The schools were very much the brainchild of Bertin, and although the latter was ousted from the post of Controller-General by Choiseul in 1763, he was continued by the king as a fifth secretary of state […].
  4. (intransitive, copulative sense obsolete) To remain in a given place or condition; to remain in connection with; to abide; to stay.
    • He then passed by the fellow, who still continued in the posture in which he fell, and entered the room where Northerton, as he had heard, was confined.
  5. (intransitive) To resume.
  6. (transitive, law) To adjourn, prorogue, put off.
  7. (poker slang) To make a continuation bet.

Usage notes

  • In the transitive sense, continue may be followed by either the present participle or the infinitive; hence use either “to continue writing” or “to continue to write”.
  • As continue conveys the sense of progression, it is pleonastic to follow it with “on” (as in “Continue on with what you were doing”).

Synonyms

  • (transitive, proceed with, to prolong): carry on, crack on, go on with, keep, keep on, keep up, proceed with, sustain
  • (intransitive, resume): carry on, go on, proceed, resume

Antonyms

  • (transitive, proceed with, to prolong): terminate, stop, discontinue

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Noun

continue (plural continues)

  1. (video games) An option allowing the player to resume play after game over, when all lives have been lost, while retaining their progress.

Anagrams

  • un-notice, unnotice

Dutch

Pronunciation

Adjective

continue

  1. Inflected form of continu

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɔ̃.ti.ny/

Verb

continue

  1. first-person singular present indicative of continuer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of continuer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of continuer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of continuer
  5. second-person singular imperative of continuer

Adjective

continue

  1. feminine singular of continu

Anagrams

  • couinent

Interlingua

Adjective

continue (comparative plus continue, superlative le plus continue)

  1. continuous

Italian

Adjective

continue

  1. feminine plural of continuo

Anagrams

  • nuocenti

Latin

Adjective

continue

  1. vocative masculine singular of continuus

References

  • continue in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • continue in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

Portuguese

Verb

continue

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of continuar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of continuar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of continuar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of continuar

Romanian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /konˈti.nu.e/

Adjective

continue (plural)

  1. feminine plural of continuu
  2. neuter plural of continuu

Verb

continue (third person subjunctive)

  1. third-person singular present subjunctive of continua
  2. third-person plural present subjunctive of continua


English

Alternative forms

  • præserve (archaic)

Etymology

From Middle English preserven, from Old French preserver, from Medieval Latin prēservāre (keep, preserve), from Late Latin praeservāre (guard beforehand), from prae (before, adverb) +‎ servāre (maintain, keep).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /pɹəˈzɜːv/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /pɹəˈzɝv/
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)v

Noun

preserve (countable and uncountable, plural preserves)

  1. A sweet spread made of any of a variety of fruits.
  2. A reservation, a nature preserve.
    • 1881, Robert Louis Stevenson, Virginibus Puerisque:
      Suppose Shakespeare had been knocked on the head some dark night in Sir Thomas Lucy’s preserves, the world would have wagged on better or worse, the pitcher gone to the well, the scythe to the corn, and the student to his book; and no one been any the wiser of the loss.
  3. An activity with restricted access.
    • 1989, H. T. Willetts (translator), Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn (author), August 1914, Farrar, Straus and Giroux, →ISBN, page 86:
      No one can argue with that—neither the Army Commander nor Zhilinsky nor even the Grand Duke. That is the Emperor’s preserve. The Emperor says France must be saved. We can only do his bidding.

Usage notes

More often used in the plural, as strawberry preserves, but the form without the -s can also be used as the plural form, or to refer to a single type.

Translations

Synonyms

  • jam
  • jelly
  • marmalade

See also

  • preserver

Verb

preserve (third-person singular simple present preserves, present participle preserving, simple past and past participle preserved)

  1. To protect; to keep from harm or injury.
  2. To save from decay by the use of some preservative substance, such as sugar or salt; to season and prepare (fruits, meat, etc.) for storage.
    to preserve peaches or grapes
  3. To maintain throughout; to keep intact.
    to preserve appearances; to preserve silence

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • persever, perverse

Portuguese

Verb

preserve

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of preservar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of preservar
  3. first-person singular imperative of preservar
  4. third-person singular imperative of preservar

Spanish

Verb

preserve

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of preservar.
  2. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of preservar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of preservar.

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