continue vs proceed what difference

what is difference between continue and proceed

English

Etymology

From Middle English continuen, from Old French continuer, from Latin continuāre. Displaced native Old English þurhwunian.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: kən-tĭnʹyo͞o, IPA(key): /kənˈtɪnjuː/
  • Rhymes: -uː

Verb

continue (third-person singular simple present continues, present participle continuing, simple past and past participle continued)

  1. (transitive) To proceed with (doing an activity); to prolong (an activity).
  2. (transitive) To make last; to prolong.
    • , New York, 2001, p.74:
      Can you account him wise or discreet that would willingly have his health, and yet will do nothing that should procure or continue it?
  3. (transitive) To retain (someone or something) in a given state, position, etc.
    • 2002, Colin Jones, The Great Nation, Penguin 2003, p.257:
      The schools were very much the brainchild of Bertin, and although the latter was ousted from the post of Controller-General by Choiseul in 1763, he was continued by the king as a fifth secretary of state […].
  4. (intransitive, copulative sense obsolete) To remain in a given place or condition; to remain in connection with; to abide; to stay.
    • He then passed by the fellow, who still continued in the posture in which he fell, and entered the room where Northerton, as he had heard, was confined.
  5. (intransitive) To resume.
  6. (transitive, law) To adjourn, prorogue, put off.
  7. (poker slang) To make a continuation bet.

Usage notes

  • In the transitive sense, continue may be followed by either the present participle or the infinitive; hence use either “to continue writing” or “to continue to write”.
  • As continue conveys the sense of progression, it is pleonastic to follow it with “on” (as in “Continue on with what you were doing”).

Synonyms

  • (transitive, proceed with, to prolong): carry on, crack on, go on with, keep, keep on, keep up, proceed with, sustain
  • (intransitive, resume): carry on, go on, proceed, resume

Antonyms

  • (transitive, proceed with, to prolong): terminate, stop, discontinue

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Noun

continue (plural continues)

  1. (video games) An option allowing the player to resume play after game over, when all lives have been lost, while retaining their progress.

Anagrams

  • un-notice, unnotice

Dutch

Pronunciation

Adjective

continue

  1. Inflected form of continu

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɔ̃.ti.ny/

Verb

continue

  1. first-person singular present indicative of continuer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of continuer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of continuer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of continuer
  5. second-person singular imperative of continuer

Adjective

continue

  1. feminine singular of continu

Anagrams

  • couinent

Interlingua

Adjective

continue (comparative plus continue, superlative le plus continue)

  1. continuous

Italian

Adjective

continue

  1. feminine plural of continuo

Anagrams

  • nuocenti

Latin

Adjective

continue

  1. vocative masculine singular of continuus

References

  • continue in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • continue in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

Portuguese

Verb

continue

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of continuar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of continuar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of continuar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of continuar

Romanian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /konˈti.nu.e/

Adjective

continue (plural)

  1. feminine plural of continuu
  2. neuter plural of continuu

Verb

continue (third person subjunctive)

  1. third-person singular present subjunctive of continua
  2. third-person plural present subjunctive of continua


English

Etymology

From Middle English proceden, from Old French proceder, from Latin prōcēdō (I go forth, go forward, advance), from prō (forth) + cēdō (I go); see cede.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɹəˈsiːd/
  • Rhymes: -iːd
  • Homophone: precede

Verb

proceed (third-person singular simple present proceeds, present participle proceeding, simple past and past participle proceeded)

  1. (intransitive) To move, pass, or go forward or onward; to advance; to carry on
  2. (intransitive) To pass from one point, topic, or stage, to another.
  3. (intransitive) To come from; to have as its source or origin.
  4. (intransitive) To go on in an orderly or regulated manner; to begin and carry on a series of acts or measures; to act methodically
    • He that proceeds upon others’ principles in his enquiry
  5. (intransitive) To be transacted; to take place; to occur.
  6. (intransitive, of a rule) To be applicable or effective; to be valid.
    • 1726, John Ayliffe, Parergon juris canonici Anglicani
      [This rule] only proceeds and takes place, when a person cannot of common Right condemn or bind another by his Sentence.
  7. (law, intransitive) To begin and carry on a legal process.
    • 2005, Rodney Stich, Disavow: Sage of Betrayal
      “Gentlemen, shall we proceed?” the judge said.
      From the beginning, Judge Fong appeared bored at Levine’s coaxing remarks.
  8. (intransitive) To take an academic degree.

Usage notes

  • When used as a catenative verb, proceed takes the to infinitive (i.e. one says proceed to swing, not proceed swing). See Appendix:English catenative verbs.
  • Not to be confused with precede.
  • Many of the other English verbs ultimately derived from Latin cēdō are spelled ending in “cede”, so the misspelling “procede” is common.

Synonyms

  • progress, forthgo

Antonyms

  • regress
  • recede

Related terms

  • procedure
  • process

Translations

See also

  • proceeds (noun)

References

  • proceed in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • proceed in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • copered, pre-Code, precode

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