contrive vs devise what difference

what is difference between contrive and devise

English

Etymology

From Middle English contreve (to invent), from Old French controver (Modern French controuver), from trover (to find) (French trouver).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kənˈtɹaɪv/
  • Rhymes: -aɪv

Verb

contrive (third-person singular simple present contrives, present participle contriving, simple past and past participle contrived)

  1. To invent by an exercise of ingenuity; to devise
    Synonyms: plan, scheme, plot, hatch
    • 1813, Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice, Modern Library Edition (1995), page 154
      [] I cannot bear the idea of two young women traveling post by themselves. It is highly improper. You must contrive to send somebody.
  2. To invent, to make devices; to form designs especially by improvisation.
  3. To project, cast, or set forth, as in a projection of light.
  4. (obsolete, transitive) To spend (time, or a period).

Synonyms

  • becast
  • cast about

Derived terms

  • contrived
  • contriver
  • contrivance

Translations

Anagrams

  • renovict


English

Etymology

From Middle English devisen, devysen, from Old French deviser, from Vulgar Latin devisō, from Latin dīvisō, frequentative of dīvidō.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dɪˈvaɪz/
  • Rhymes: -aɪz
  • Hyphenation: de‧vise

Verb

devise (third-person singular simple present devises, present participle devising, simple past and past participle devised)

  1. (transitive) To use one’s intellect to plan or design (something).
    to devise an argument; to devise a machine, or a new system of writing
    • 1834-1874, George Bancroft, History of the United States, from the Discovery of the American Continent.
      devising schemes to realize his ambitious views
  2. (transitive) To leave (property) in a will.
  3. (intransitive, archaic) To form a scheme; to lay a plan; to contrive; to consider.
  4. (transitive, archaic) To plan or scheme for; to plot to obtain.
  5. (obsolete) To imagine; to guess.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Spenser to this entry?)

Translations

Noun

devise (plural devises)

  1. The act of leaving real property in a will.
  2. Such a will, or a clause in such a will.
    • 1834-1874, George Bancroft, History of the United States, from the Discovery of the American Continent.
      Fines upon devises were still exacted.
  3. The real property left in such a will.
  4. Design, devising.
    • 2010, Carl Anderson, Fragments of a Scattered Brain →ISBN, page 83
      I don’t know how I got to be so sour on life, but I’m constantly in solitary confinement of my own devise, []

See also

  • device
  • devising

Anagrams

  • sieved, viséed

Danish

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -iːsə

Noun

devise c (singular definite devisen, plural indefinite deviser)

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

Declension

Further reading

  • “devise” in Den Danske Ordbog

French

Etymology

From deviser. The financial sense is a semantic loan from German Devise.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /də.viz/

Noun

devise f (plural devises)

  1. (heraldry) motto
  2. (finance) assets in foreign currency
  3. (finance, by extension) currency

Verb

devise

  1. inflection of deviser:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further reading

  • “devise” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • dévies, évides, évidés, vidées

Spanish

Verb

devise

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of devisar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of devisar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of devisar.
  4. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of devisar.

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