contrive vs project what difference

what is difference between contrive and project

English

Etymology

From Middle English contreve (to invent), from Old French controver (Modern French controuver), from trover (to find) (French trouver).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kənˈtɹaɪv/
  • Rhymes: -aɪv

Verb

contrive (third-person singular simple present contrives, present participle contriving, simple past and past participle contrived)

  1. To invent by an exercise of ingenuity; to devise
    Synonyms: plan, scheme, plot, hatch
    • 1813, Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice, Modern Library Edition (1995), page 154
      [] I cannot bear the idea of two young women traveling post by themselves. It is highly improper. You must contrive to send somebody.
  2. To invent, to make devices; to form designs especially by improvisation.
  3. To project, cast, or set forth, as in a projection of light.
  4. (obsolete, transitive) To spend (time, or a period).

Synonyms

  • becast
  • cast about

Derived terms

  • contrived
  • contriver
  • contrivance

Translations

Anagrams

  • renovict


English

Etymology

From Latin prōiectus, perfect passive participle of prōiciō (throw forth, extend; expel).

Pronunciation

Noun
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈpɹɒdʒɛkt/, (rare) /ˈpɹəʊdʒɛkt/
  • (General Australian) IPA(key): /ˈpɹəʊdʒɛkt/, /ˈpɹɒdʒɛkt/
  • (General American) enPR: prŏjʹĕkt’, prŏjʹĭkt IPA(key): /ˈpɹɑdʒˌɛkt/, /ˈpɹɑdʒɪ̈kt/
  • (Canada) IPA(key): /ˈpɹɑdʒɛkt/, /ˈpɹoʊdʒɛkt/
  • Rhymes: -ɒdʒɛkt, -ɒdʒəkt, -ɒdʒɪkt, -əʊdʒɛkt
  • Hyphenation: proj‧ect
Verb
  • (Received Pronunciation, General American, Canada) enPR: prə-jĕktʹ IPA(key): /pɹəˈdʒɛkt/
  • Rhymes: -ɛkt
  • Hyphenation: pro‧ject

Noun

project (plural projects)

  1. A planned endeavor, usually with a specific goal and accomplished in several steps or stages.
    • a. 1729, John Rogers, The Greatness of the Gospel Salvation
      projects of happiness devised by human reason
    • 1924, Clarence Budington Kelland, The Steadfast Heart/Chapter 22
      Rainbow, [] came forward enthusiastically to put its money into the project in sums which ran all the way from one share at ten dollars to ten shares
    • 2019, VOA Learning English (public domain)
      The proposal with China would involve a project to create artificial rain.

  2. (usually in the plural, US) An urban low-income housing building.
  3. (dated) An idle scheme; an impracticable design.
  4. (US, sports) a raw recruit who the team hopes will improve greatly with coaching; a long shot diamond in the rough
    • 2014 Oct 27, Gabriele Marcotti, “Ancelotti triumphs, van Gaal’s progress, Dortmund disappoint, more”, ESPN FC:
      Sakho was seen as no-frills, whereas Maiga was a project who could develop into the next big thing.
    • 2018 Sep 2, Arnie Melendrez Stapleton, “Broncos cut ties with 2016 first-round pick QB Lynch”, WNYT:
      Elway acknowledged at the time that Lynch was a project who needed some seasoning but he expressed hope that Lynch might be a quick study. He wasn’t.
  5. (obsolete) A projectile.
  6. (obsolete) A projection.
  7. (obsolete) The place from which a thing projects.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Holland to this entry?)

Hyponyms

Descendants

  • Japanese: プロジェクト (purojekuto)
  • Korean: 프로젝트 (peurojekteu)

Translations

Verb

project (third-person singular simple present projects, present participle projecting, simple past and past participle projected)

  1. (intransitive) To extend beyond a surface.
    Synonyms: extend, jut, protrude, stick out
  2. (transitive) To cast (an image or shadow) upon a surface; to throw or cast forward; to shoot forth.
    Synonyms: cast, throw
  3. (transitive) To extend (a protrusion or appendage) outward.
    Synonyms: extend, jut, jut out
  4. (transitive) To make plans for; to forecast.
    Synonyms: forecast, foresee, foretell
  5. (transitive, reflexive) To present (oneself), to convey a certain impression, usually in a good way.
    • 1946, Dr. Ralph S. Banay, The Milwaukee Journal, Is Modern Woman a Failure:
      It is difficult to gauge the exact point at which women stop trying to fool men and really begin to deceive themselves, but an objective analyst cannot escape the conclusion (1) that partly from a natural device inherent in the species, women deliberately project upon actual or potential suitors an impression of themselves that is not an accurate picture of their total nature, and (2) that few women ever are privileged to see themselves as they really are.
  6. (transitive, psychology, psychoanalysis) To assume qualities or mindsets in others based on one’s own personality.
  7. (cartography) To change the projection (or coordinate system) of spatial data with another projection.
  8. (geometry) To draw straight lines from a fixed point through every point of any body or figure, and let these fall upon a surface so as to form the points of a new figure.

Translations

Further reading

  • John A. Simpson and Edward S. C. Weiner, editors (1989), “project”, in The Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd edition, Oxford: Clarendon Press, →ISBN.

Dutch

Etymology

Ultimately from Latin prōiectum. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /proːˈjɛkt/
  • Hyphenation: pro‧ject
  • Rhymes: -ɛkt

Noun

project n (plural projecten, diminutive projectje n)

  1. project (planned endeavor)

Derived terms

  • bouwproject
  • kunstproject
  • projectonderwijs
  • projectontwikkelaar

Related terms

  • projecteren
  • projectie
  • projector

Descendants

  • Afrikaans: projek
  • Indonesian: proyek

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