controvert vs refute what difference

what is difference between controvert and refute

English

Etymology

From post-classical Latin controvertere (6th century), from Latin contro- (against) + vertere (to turn).

Verb

controvert (third-person singular simple present controverts, present participle controverting, simple past and past participle controverted)

  1. (transitive) To dispute, to argue about (something). [from 16th c.]
  2. (transitive) To argue against (something or someone); to contradict, to deny. [from 16th c.]
    • 1792, Mary Wollstonecraft, A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, Penguin 2004, p. 234:
      [T]hat women from their education and the present state of civilized life, are in the same condition, cannot, I think, be controverted.
  3. (intransitive) To be involved or engaged in controversy; to argue. [from 17th c.]

Related terms

  • controversial
  • controversialist
  • controversy
  • controverter
  • controvertible
  • incontrovertible

Translations

Further reading

  • controvert in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • controvert in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.


English

Etymology

From Latin refūtō (refute, repudiate).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, US): enPR: rə-fyo͞ot, IPA(key): /ɹɪˈfjuːt/, /ɹəˈfjut/
  • Hyphenation: re‧fute
  • Rhymes: -uːt

Verb

refute (third-person singular simple present refutes, present participle refuting, simple past and past participle refuted)

  1. (transitive) To prove (something) to be false or incorrect.
  2. (transitive, proscribed) To deny the truth or correctness of (something).

Usage notes

  • The second meaning of refute (to deny the truth of) is proscribed as erroneous by some (compare Merriam Webster,1994). An alternative term with such a meaning is repudiate, which means to reject or refuse to acknowledge, but without the implication of justification. However, this distinction does not exist in the original Latin refūtō (oppose, resist, rebut), which can apply to both senses.
  • Refute is also often confused with rebut; a rebuttal, in formal debate terms, is a counter-refutation, and it also has a specific legal sense, though like refutation, the word has taken on the informal and disputed meaning of denial.

Synonyms

  • (prove (something) to be false): debunk, disprove, rebut
  • (deny the truth or correctness): deny, gainsay, rebut, reject, repudiate

Antonyms

  • (prove (something) to be false): demonstrate, prove
  • (deny the truth or correctness): accept, embrace

Related terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • Fuerte, feuter, feutre

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • refeut, reffute, refuit, refut, refutt, refuyt, refyte

Etymology

From Old French refuite, from refuir (to flee). Compare refuge.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /rɛˈfiu̯t(ə)/

Noun

refute (uncountable)

  1. refuge (state of protection or comfort)
  2. refuge (place of protection or comfort)
  3. A protector or comforter.

References

  • “refūt(e, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Portuguese

Verb

refute

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of refutar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of refutar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of refutar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of refutar

Spanish

Verb

refute

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of refutar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of refutar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of refutar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of refutar.

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