convulse vs toss what difference

what is difference between convulse and toss

English

Etymology

From Latin convulsus, past participle of convellere (to pluck up, dislocate, convulse), from com- (together) + vellere (to pluck, pull)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kənˈvʌls/

Verb

convulse (third-person singular simple present convulses, present participle convulsing, simple past and past participle convulsed)

  1. (transitive) To violently shake or agitate.
  2. (transitive) To create great laughter.
  3. (intransitive) To suffer violent involuntary contraction of the muscles, producing contortions of the body or limbs.

Related terms

  • convulsion
  • convulsive
  • convulsant

Translations

Further reading

  • convulse in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • convulse in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Italian

Adjective

convulse

  1. feminine plural of convulso

Latin

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /konˈu̯ul.se/, [kɔnˈu̯ols̠ɛ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /konˈvul.se/, [kɔnˈvulsɛ]

Participle

convulse

  1. vocative masculine singular of convulsus

Portuguese

Verb

convulse

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of convulsar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of convulsar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of convulsar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of convulsar


English

Etymology

From Middle English tossen (to buffet about, agitate, toss; to sift or winnow), of uncertain origin. Perhaps from Old Norse (compare dialectal Norwegian tossa, dialectal Swedish tossa (to strew, spread)), or perhaps from an alteration of Middle English tosen (to tease, pull apart, shred; to wound, injure). Compare also Dutch tassen (to pile or heap up, stack).

The Welsh tos (a quick jerk) and tosio (to jerk, toss) are probably borrowed from the English.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /tɒs/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /tɔs/
  • (cotcaught merger, Canada) IPA(key): /tɑs/
  • Rhymes: -ɒs

Noun

toss (plural tosses)

  1. A throw, a lob, of a ball etc., with an initial upward direction, particularly with a lack of care.
  2. (cricket, soccer) The coin toss before a cricket match in order to decide who bats first, or before a football match in order to decide the direction of play.
  3. A haughty throwing up of the head.
  4. (British slang) A jot, in the phrase ‘give a toss’.
    I couldn’t give a toss about her.
  5. (British slang) A state of agitation; commotion.
  6. (Billingsgate Fish Market slang) A measure of sprats.

Derived terms

  • argue the toss

Translations

Verb

toss (third-person singular simple present tosses, present participle tossing, simple past and past participle tossed or (obsolete) tost)

  1. To throw with an initial upward direction.
  2. To lift with a sudden or violent motion.
    • He tossed his arm aloft, and proudly told me, / He would not stay.
  3. To agitate; to make restless.
  4. To subject to trials; to harass.
    • Whom devils fly, thus is he tossed of men.
  5. To flip a coin, to decide a point of contention.
  6. (informal, transitive) To discard; to throw away.
    Synonym: toss out
  7. To stir or mix (a salad).
  8. (British slang) To masturbate
  9. (transitive, informal) To search (a room or a cell), sometimes leaving visible disorder, as for valuables or evidence of a crime.
  10. (intransitive) To roll and tumble; to be in violent commotion.
  11. (intransitive) To be tossed, as a fleet on the ocean, or as a ship in heavy seas.
  12. (obsolete) To keep in play; to tumble over.
  13. (rowing) To peak (the oars), to lift them from the rowlocks and hold them perpendicularly, the handle resting on the bottom of the boat.
  14. (British slang) To drink in large draughts; to gulp.

Derived terms

  • toss one’s cookies
  • tosser
  • toss off
  • tosspot
  • toss in
  • toss up
  • toss and turn
  • tosticated

Translations

Anagrams

  • OSTs, SSTO, osts, sots

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