Cord vs Chord what difference

what is difference between Cord and Chord

English

Etymology

From Middle English corde, from Old French corde, from Latin chorda, from Doric Ancient Greek χορδά (khordá, string of gut, the string of a lyre) (compare Ionic χορδή (khordḗ), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰer- (bowel)). More at yarn and hernia.

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /kɔɹd/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /kɔːd/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)d
  • Homophones: chord, cored (in accents with the horse-hoarse merger), cawed (in non-rhotic accents)

Noun

cord (countable and uncountable, plural cords)

  1. A long, thin, flexible length of twisted yarns (strands) of fiber (rope, for example); (uncountable) such a length of twisted strands considered as a commodity.
  2. A small flexible electrical conductor composed of wires insulated separately or in bundles and assembled together usually with an outer cover; the electrical cord of a lamp, sweeper ((US) vacuum cleaner), or other appliance.
  3. A unit of measurement for firewood, equal to 128 cubic feet (4 × 4 × 8 feet), composed of logs and/or split logs four feet long and none over eight inches diameter. It is usually seen as a stack four feet high by eight feet long.
  4. (figuratively) Any influence by which persons are caught, held, or drawn, as if by a cord.
    • 1900, Charles W. Chesnutt, The House Behind the Cedars, Chapter I,
      Every detail of the house and garden was familiar; a thousand cords of memory and affection drew him thither; but a stronger counter-motive prevailed.
  5. (anatomy) Any structure having the appearance of a cord, especially a tendon or nerve.
  6. Dated form of chord: musical sense.
  7. Misspelling of chord: a cross-section measurement of an aircraft wing.

Synonyms

  • (length of twisted strands): cable, twine
  • (wires surrounded by an insulating coating, used to supply electricity): cable, flex
  • See also Thesaurus:string

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

cord (third-person singular simple present cords, present participle cording, simple past and past participle corded)

  1. To furnish with cords
  2. To tie or fasten with cords
  3. To flatten a book during binding
  4. To arrange (wood, etc.) in a pile for measurement by the cord.

Middle English

Noun

cord

  1. Alternative form of corde

Romanian

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin cor, cordis.

Noun

cord n (plural corduri)

  1. (anatomy) heart
    Synonym: inimă

Declension

Related terms

  • cordial


English

Alternative forms

  • (music): cord (dated)

Etymology

Variant of cord, with spelling alteration due to Latin chorda (cord), ultimately from Ancient Greek (Doric) χορδά (khordá), (Ionic) χορδή (khordḗ, string of gut, the string of a lyre)

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /kɔː(ɹ)d/
  • (US) enPR: kôrd, IPA(key): /kɔɹd/
  • Homophones: cord, cored (in accents with the horse-hoarse merger)

Noun

chord (plural chords)

  1. (music) A harmonic set of three or more notes that is heard as if sounding simultaneously.
  2. (geometry) A straight line between two points of a curve.
  3. (engineering) A horizontal member of a truss.
    1. (rail transport) A section of subsidiary railway track that interconnects two primary tracks that cross at different levels, to permit traffic to flow between them.
  4. (aeronautics) The distance between the leading and trailing edge of a wing, measured in the direction of the normal airflow.
  5. (nautical) An imaginary line from the luff of a sail to its leech.
  6. (computing) A keyboard shortcut that involves two or more distinct keypresses, such as Ctrl+M followed by P.
  7. The string of a musical instrument.
  8. (anatomy) A cord.
  9. (graph theory) An edge that is not part of a cycle but connects two vertices of the cycle.

Derived terms

  • mixed-interval chord
  • strike a chord, touch a chord
  • glasschord

Translations

Verb

chord (third-person singular simple present chords, present participle chording, simple past and past participle chorded)

  1. (transitive) To write chords for.
  2. (music) To accord; to harmonize together.
    This note chords with that one.
  3. (transitive) To provide with musical chords or strings; to string; to tune.
    • 1687, John Dryden, A Song for Cecilia’s Day
      When Jubal struck the chorded shell.
    • 1862, Henry Ward Beecher, Eyes and Ears
      Even the solitary old pine tree chords his harp.

Translations

See also

  • simultaneity

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