corner vs nook what difference

what is difference between corner and nook

English

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈkɔɹnɚ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈkɔːnə(ɹ)/
  • Hyphenation: cor‧ner
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)nə(ɹ)

Etymology

From Middle English corner, from Anglo-Norman cornere (compare Old French cornier, corniere (corner)), from Old French corne (corner, angle, literally a horn, projecting point), from Vulgar Latin *corna (horn), from Latin cornua, plural of cornū (projecting point, end, horn). More at hirn.

Noun

corner (plural corners)

  1. The point where two converging lines meet; an angle, either external or internal.
    1. The space in the angle between converging lines or walls which meet in a point.
    2. The projection into space of an angle in a solid object.
    3. An intersection of two streets; any of the four outer points off the street at that intersection.
    4. (attributive) Denoting a premises that is in a convenient local location, notionally, but not necessarily literally, on the corner of two streets.
  2. An edge or extremity; the part farthest from the center; hence, any quarter or part, or the direction in which it lies.
    • c. 1596-1598, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act 2, Scene 7:
      Why, that’s the lady: all the world desires her; / From the four corners of the earth they come, / To kiss this shrine, this mortal-breathing saint:
  3. A secret or secluded place; a remote or out of the way place; a nook.
  4. An embarrassing situation; a difficulty.
  5. (business, finance) A sufficient interest in a salable security or commodity to allow the cornering party to influence prices.
  6. (heading) Relating to the playing field.
    1. (baseball) One of the four vertices of the strike zone.
    2. (baseball) First base or third base.
    3. (soccer) A corner kick.
    4. (American football) A cornerback.
    5. (boxing) The corner of the ring, which is where the boxer rests before and during a fight.
    6. (boxing, by extension) The group of people who assist a boxer during a bout.
  7. A place where people meet for a particular purpose.
  8. (obsolete) A point scored in a rubber at whist.
Quotations
  • 2006, Kelly K. Chappell, Effects of Concept-based Instruction on Calculus Students’ Acquisition of Conceptual Understanding and Procedural Skill, in John Dossey, Solomon Friedberg, Glenda Lappan, W. James Lewis (editorial committee), Research in Collegiate Mathematics Education VI, page 41,
    Of the students enrolled in a traditional learning environment, 65% (42 of 65) correctly answered that the function




    f
    (
    x
    )
    =

    |

    x

    3

    |

    +
    4


    {\displaystyle f(x)=|x-3|+4}

    was not differentiable (or had no derivative) at




    x
    =
    3


    {\displaystyle x=3}

    .Of those, 55% (23 of 42) argued that a function did not have a derivative at a corner.

Synonyms
Derived terms
Descendants
  • German: Corner
  • Japanese: コーナー (kōnā)
Translations

Verb

corner (third-person singular simple present corners, present participle cornering, simple past and past participle cornered)

  1. (transitive) To drive (someone or something) into a corner or other confined space.
    • 2013 June 18, Simon Romero, “Protests Widen as Brazilians Chide Leaders,” New York Times (retrieved 21 June 2013):
      In Juazeiro do Norte, demonstrators cornered the mayor inside a bank for hours and called for his impeachment, while thousands of others protested teachers’ salaries.
  2. (transitive) To trap in a position of great difficulty or hopeless embarrassment.
  3. (transitive) To put (someone) in an awkward situation.
  4. (finance, business, transitive) To get sufficient command of (a stock, commodity, etc.), so as to be able to manipulate its price.
  5. (automotive, transitive) To turn a corner or drive around a curve.
  6. (automotive, intransitive) To handle while moving around a corner in a road or otherwise turning.
  7. (transitive) To supply with corners.
    • 1937, Mechanical World and Engineering Record (volume 102, page 208)
      Tool for cornering and cutting off copper switch blades
Translations

Catalan

Noun

corner m (plural corners)

  1. snowy mespilus (Amelanchier ovalis)

French

Etymology 1

Borrowed from English corner.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɔʁ.nœʁ/

Noun

corner m (plural corners)

  1. (soccer) corner kick, corner
Synonyms
  • coup de pied de coin

Etymology 2

corne +‎ -er

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɔʁ.ne/

Verb

corner

  1. to fold a corner of a page
  2. to blow, horn (a cornet or horn)
  3. to bellow
  4. to honk, beep (a vehicle’s horn)
  5. to shout from the rooftops
Conjugation

Further reading

  • “corner” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English corner.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈkɔr.ner/

Noun

corner m

  1. (soccer) corner
  2. (figuratively) difficult situation
  3. (economics) market niche in which a company has a monopoly

References


Middle English

Alternative forms

  • cornere, korner, cornare, cornyere
  • cornel, cornelle

Etymology

Borrowed from Anglo-Norman cornere.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈkɔrnər(ə)/, /ˈkɔrneːr(ə)/

Noun

corner (plural corneres)

  1. A corner or angle; an intersection of two objects where both terminate.
  2. The interior or inside of a corner.
  3. A refuge or redoubt; a location of safety.
  4. A place, especially a faraway or distant one.
  5. (rare) A overlook or viewpoint.
  6. (rare) The side of a troop or host.

Derived terms

  • cornered
  • corner stoon

Descendants

  • English: corner
  • Scots: corner
  • Yola: curneale, kurneal

References

  • “cornẹ̄̆r, n.(1).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-07-08.

Old French

Verb

corner

  1. to blow; to horn (sound a horn)

Conjugation

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. The forms that would normally end in *-rns, *-rnt are modified to rz, rt. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.


Spanish

Noun

corner m (plural corneres)

  1. corner kick


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: no͝ok, IPA(key): /nʊk/
  • (obsolete) enPR: no͞ok, IPA(key): /nuːk/
  • Rhymes: -ʊk

Etymology

From Middle English noke, nok (nook, corner, angle), of uncertain origin. Cognate with Scots neuk, nuk (corner, angle of a square, angular object). Perhaps from Old English hnoc, hnocc (hook, angle), from Proto-Germanic *hnukkaz, *hnukkô (a bend), from Proto-Indo-European *knewg- (to turn, press), from Proto-Indo-European *ken- (to pinch, press, bend). If so, then also related to Scots nok (small hook), Norwegian dialectal nok, nokke (hook, angle, bent object), Danish nok (hook), Swedish nock (ridge), Faroese nokki (crook), Icelandic hnokki (hook), Dutch nok (ridge), Low German Nocke (tip), Old Norse hnúka (to bend, crouch), Old English ġehnycned (drawn, pinched, wrinkled).

Noun

nook (plural nooks)

  1. A small corner formed by two walls; an alcove.
    Synonyms: alcove, ancone, recess
  2. A hidden or secluded spot; a secluded retreat.
  3. A recess, cove or hollow.
    Synonym: niche
  4. (historical) An English unit of land area, originally 14 of a yardland but later 12+12 or 20 acres.
    Synonym: fardel
    • a. 1634, W. Noye, The Complete Lawyer, 57:
      You must note, that two Fardells of Land make a Nooke of Land, and two Nookes make halfe a Yard of Land.
    • 1903, English Dialectical Dictionary, volume IV, page 295:
      Nook, an old legal term for 12+12 acres of land; still in use at Alston.
    • 1968, November 9, The Economist, page 2:
      They poured their wine by the aume or the fust, and cut their cloth by the goad—not to be confused with the gawd, which was a measure of steel. Their nook was not cosy; it covered 20 acres.
  5. (chiefly Northern England, archaic) A corner of a piece of land; an angled piece of land, especially one extending into other land.

Alternative forms

  • (corner of a piece of land): nuke

Hypernyms

  • (unit of area): See hundred (16,000 nooks); see carucate (16); see virgate (4); see oxgang (2)

Hyponyms

  • (unit of area): See fardel (12 nook), see acre (various fractions & for further subdivisions)

Derived terms

Related terms

  • inglenook

Translations

Verb

nook (third-person singular simple present nooks, present participle nooking, simple past and past participle nooked)

  1. To withdraw into a nook.
  2. To situate in a nook.

References

Anagrams

  • Kono

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial