corrosion vs erosion what difference

what is difference between corrosion and erosion

English

Etymology

From Old French corrosion, or its source, Late Latin corrōsiōnem, accusative singular of corrōsiō (gnawing away, corroding), from Latin corrōdō (gnaw away, corrode).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /kəˈɹəʊʒən/
  • (US) IPA(key): /kəˈɹoʊʒən/

Noun

corrosion (countable and uncountable, plural corrosions)

  1. The act of corroding or the condition so produced.
  2. A substance (such as rust) so formed.
  3. (chemistry) Erosion by chemical action, especially oxidation.
  4. (by extension) The gradual destruction or undermining of something.

Related terms

  • corrosible

Translations


French

Etymology

Borrowed from Late Latin corrōsiōnem, accusative singular of corrōsiō (gnawing away, corroding), from Latin corrōdō (gnaw away, corrode).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɔ.ʁɔ.zjɔ̃/

Noun

corrosion f (plural corrosions)

  1. corrosion

Further reading

  • “corrosion” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Old French

Noun

corrosion f (oblique plural corrosions, nominative singular corrosion, nominative plural corrosions)

  1. corrosion


English

Etymology

From Middle French erosion, from Latin ērōsiō (eating away), derived from ērōdō.

The first known occurrence in English was in the 1541 translation by Robert Copland of Guy de Chauliac’s medical text The Questyonary of Cyrurygens. Copland used erosion to describe how ulcers developed in the mouth. By 1774 erosion was used outside medical subjects. Oliver Goldsmith employed the term in the more contemporary geological context, in his book Natural History, with the quote

Bounds are thus put to the erosion of the earth by water.”

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /əˈɹoʊʒən/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /əˈɹəʊʒən/

Noun

erosion (countable and uncountable, plural erosions)

  1. (uncountable) The result of having been worn away or eroded, as by a glacier on rock or the sea on a cliff face.
    • 1995, Graham Linehan & al., “Good Luck, Father Ted”, Father Ted Series 1, Episode 1, Channel Four:
      Father Ted: The cliffs were gone? How could they just disappear?
      Dougal: Erosion.
    • 2012, George Monbiot, Guardian Weekly, August 24, p.20
      Even second-generation biofuels, made from crop wastes or wood, are an environmental disaster, either extending the cultivated area or removing the straw and stovers which protect the soil from erosion and keep carbon and nutrients in the ground.
  2. (uncountable) The changing of a surface by mechanical action, friction, thermal expansion contraction, or impact.
  3. (uncountable, figuratively) The gradual loss of something as a result of an ongoing process.
    the erosion of a person’s trust
    trademark erosion, caused by everyday use of the trademarked term
  4. (uncountable) Destruction by abrasive action of fluids.
  5. (mathematics, image processing) One of two fundamental operations in morphological image processing from which all other morphological operations are derived.
  6. (dentistry) Loss of tooth enamel due to non-bacteriogenic chemical processes.
  7. (medicine) A shallow ulceration or lesion, usually involving skin or epithelial tissue.
  8. (mathematics) In morphology, a basic operation (denoted ⊖); see Erosion (morphology).

Derived terms

Related terms

  • erode

Translations

Anagrams

  • Reinoso

Basque

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /eɾos̺ion/, [e̞.ɾo̞.s̺i.õ̞n]

Verb

erosion

  1. Informal second-person singular feminine (hik), taking third-person singular (hari) as indirect object and third-person singular (hura) as direct object, present imperative form of erosi.

Friulian

Noun

erosion f (plural erosions)

  1. erosion

Interlingua

Noun

erosion (plural erosiones)

  1. erosion (shallow lesion or ulceration)

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