Cottage vs Bungalow what difference

what is difference between Cottage and Bungalow

English

Etymology

Late Middle English, from Anglo-Norman cotage and Medieval Latin cotagium, from Old Northern French cot, cote (hut, cottage) + -age (surrounding property), from Proto-Germanic *kutan, *kuta- (shed), probably of non-Indo-European origin, but possibly borrowed from Uralic; compare Finnish kota (hut, house) and Hungarian ház (house), both from Proto-Finno-Ugric/Proto-Uralic *kota. However, also compare Dutch and English hut.

Old Northern French cote is probably from Old Norse kot (hut), cognate of Old English cot of same Proto-Germanic origin.

Slang sense “public toilet” from 19th century, due to resemblance.

Pronunciation

  • (General American)
    • IPA(key): /ˈkɑtɪdʒ/, [ˈkɑɾɪdʒ]
    • (weak vowel merger) IPA(key): /ˈkɑtədʒ/, [ˈkɑɾədʒ]
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈkɒtɪdʒ/
  • Hyphenation: cot‧tage

Noun

cottage (plural cottages)

  1. A small house.
    Synonyms: cot, hut
  2. A seasonal home of any size or stature, a recreational home or a home in a remote location.
  3. (Britain, slang, archaic) A public lavatory.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:bathroom
  4. (Polari) A meeting place for homosexual men.
    Synonyms: gingerbread office, tea room, tearoom, teahouse, (US) tea house

Derived terms

  • cottage cheese
  • cottage food operation
  • cottage hospital
  • cottage industry
  • telecottage

Related terms

  • cosset
  • cot
  • coterie

Descendants

  • French: cottage

Translations

Verb

cottage (third-person singular simple present cottages, present participle cottaging, simple past and past participle cottaged)

  1. To stay at a seasonal home, to go cottaging.
  2. (intransitive, Polari, of men) To have homosexual sex in a public lavatory; to practice cottaging.

Further reading

  • cottage on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

References


French

Etymology

Borrowed from English cottage.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɔ.taʒ/

Noun

cottage m (plural cottages)

  1. cottage

Portuguese

Noun

cottage m (uncountable)

  1. cottage cheese (a cheese curd product)


English

Etymology

Borrowed from Hindi बंगला (baṅglā, Bengali), referring to the Bengali-style house. Compare Gujarati બંગલો (baṅglo) and Bengali বাংলা (baṅla). Doublet of bangalo.

Noun

bungalow (plural bungalows)

  1. A single-storey house, typically with rooms all on one level, or sometimes also with upper rooms set into the roof space.
    My aunt can’t manage the stairs any more, so she’s moving to a bungalow.
  2. A thatched or tiled one-story house in India surrounded by a wide verandah

Translations

References

  • “bungalow”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.
  • “bungalow” in TheFreeDictionary.com, Huntingdon Valley, Pa.: Farlex, Inc., 2003–2021.

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English bungalow, from Hindi बंगला (baṅglā).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbʏŋ.ɡə.loː/, /ˈbʏŋ.ɡaː.loː/
  • Hyphenation: bun‧ga‧low

Noun

bungalow m (plural bungalows, diminutive bungalowtje n)

  1. A bungalow (small holiday home, usually single-storey).

Derived terms

  • bungalowpark

Finnish

Noun

bungalow

  1. bungalow (one-story house in India surrounded by a verandah)

Declension


French

Pronunciation

  • (France, Belgium, Switzerland) IPA(key): /bœ̃.ɡa.lo/
  • (Quebec) IPA(key): /bɔŋ.ɡa.lo/

Noun

bungalow m (plural bungalows)

  1. bungalow

Further reading

  • “bungalow” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Spanish

Alternative forms

  • bungaló

Etymology

From English bungalow.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bunɡaˈlo/, [bũŋ.ɡaˈlo]

Noun

bungalow m (plural bungalows)

  1. bungalow

Further reading

  • “bungalow” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

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