countervail vs offset what difference

what is difference between countervail and offset

English

Etymology

From Anglo-Norman countrevaloir ( = Old French contrevaloir), from Latin contrā valēre (to be worth against).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈkaʊntəveɪl/

Verb

countervail (third-person singular simple present countervails, present participle countervailing, simple past and past participle countervailed)

  1. (obsolete) To have the same value as.
  2. To counteract, counterbalance or neutralize.
  3. To compensate for.
    • c. 1700, Roger L’Estrange, Seneca’s Morals
      countervail a very confiderable Advantage to all Men of Letters
    • 1988, Richard Ellmann, The Norton Anthology of Modern Poetry, 2nd ed. (New York: W.W. Norton, 1988), p. 539.
      If [Wilfred] Owen preserves his youthful romanticism, or at least a shell of it, he uses it to countervail the horrifying scenes he describes, just as he poses his own youth against the age-old spectacle of men dying in pain and futility.

Translations

Anagrams

  • involucrate


English

Etymology

From off- +‎ set, used to construct the noun form of the verb to set off.

Pronunciation

  • Noun:
    • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɒf.sɛt/
    • (US) IPA(key): /ˈɑf.sɛt/
  • Verb:
    • (UK) IPA(key): /ɒfˈsɛt/, /ˈɒf.sɛt/
    • (US) IPA(key): /ɑfˈsɛt/, /ˈɑf.sɛt/

Noun

offset (plural offsets)

  1. Anything that acts as counterbalance; a compensating equivalent.
  2. (international trade) A form of countertrade arrangement, in which the seller agrees to purchase within a set time frame products of a certain value from the buying country. This kind of agreement may be used in large international public sector contracts such as arms sales.
  3. (obsolete, c. 1555) A time at which something begins; outset.
  4. (printing, often attributive) The offset printing process, in which ink is carried from a metal plate to a rubber blanket and from there to the printing surface.
  5. (programming) The difference between a target memory address and a base address.
  6. (signal analysis) The displacement between the base level of a measurement and the signal’s real base level.
  7. The distance by which one thing is out of alignment with another.
  8. (surveying) A short distance measured at right angles from a line actually run to some point in an irregular boundary, or to some object.
  9. An abrupt bend in an object, such as a rod, by which one part is turned aside out of line, but nearly parallel, with the rest; the part thus bent aside.
  10. (botany) A short prostrate shoot that takes root and produces a tuft of leaves, etc.
  11. A spur from a range of hills or mountains.
  12. (architecture) A horizontal ledge on the face of a wall, formed by a diminution of its thickness, or by the weathering or upper surface of a part built out from it; a set-off.
  13. (architecture) A terrace on a hillside.
  14. away from or off from the general locations and area where a movie’s, a film‘s, or a video’s scenery is arranged to be filmed or from those places for actors, assorted crew, director, producers which are typically not filmed.

Translations

Verb

offset (third-person singular simple present offsets, present participle offsetting, simple past and past participle offset or offsetted)

  1. (transitive) To counteract or compensate for, by applying a change in the opposite direction.
  2. (transitive) To place out of line.
  3. (transitive) To form an offset in (a wall, rod, pipe, etc.).

Translations

See also

  • onset

Anagrams

  • set off, set-off, setoff

Portuguese

Alternative forms

  • ofsete

Noun

offset m (plural offsets)

  1. (programming) offset (byte difference between memory addresses)
  2. (printing) offset (a printing method)

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