course vs line what difference

what is difference between course and line

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: kôs, IPA(key): /kɔːs/
  • (General American) enPR: kôrs, IPA(key): /kɔːɹs/, /kɔɹs/
  • (rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) enPR: kōrs, IPA(key): /ko(ː)ɹs/
  • (non-rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /koəs/
  • (Tasmania) IPA(key): /kɜːs/
  • Homophone: coarse; curse (Tasmania)
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)s, -ɜː(ɹ)s (Tasmania)

Etymology 1

From Middle English cours, from Old French cours, from Latin cursus (course of a race), from currō (run), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ḱers- (to run). Doublet of cursus.

Noun

course (plural courses)

  1. A sequence of events.
    1. A normal or customary sequence.
    2. A programme, a chosen manner of proceeding.
    3. Any ordered process or sequence of steps.
    4. A learning programme, whether a single class or (Britain) a major area of study.
      • 1661, John Fell, The Life of the most learned, reverend and pious Dr. H. Hammond
        During the whole time of his abode in the university he generally spent thirteen hours of the day in study; by which assiduity besides an exact dispatch of the whole course of philosophy, he read over in a manner all classic authors that are extant []
      • 1992 August 21, Edwina Currie, Diary:
        Her course will be ‘Communication Studies with Theatre Studies’: God, how tedious, how pointless.
    5. (especially in medicine) A treatment plan.
      • 1932, Agatha Christie, The Thirteen Problems
        Miss Clark, alarmed at her increasing stoutness, was doing a course of what is popularly known as banting.
    6. A stage of a meal.
    7. The succession of one to another in office or duty; order; turn.
      • He appointed [] the courses of the priests.
  2. A path that something or someone moves along.
    1. The itinerary of a race.
    2. A racecourse.
    3. The path taken by a flow of water; a watercourse.
    4. (sports) The trajectory of a ball, frisbee etc.
    5. (golf) A golf course.
    6. (nautical) The direction of movement of a vessel at any given moment.
    7. (navigation) The intended passage of voyage, such as a boat, ship, airplane, spaceship, etc.
  3. (nautical) The lowest square sail in a fully rigged mast, often named according to the mast.
  4. (in the plural, courses, obsolete, euphemistic) Menses.
  5. A row or file of objects.
    1. (masonry) A row of bricks or blocks.
    2. (roofing) A row of material that forms the roofing, waterproofing or flashing system.
    3. (textiles) In weft knitting, a single row of loops connecting the loops of the preceding and following rows.
  6. (music) One or more strings on some musical instruments (such as the guitar, lute or vihuela): if multiple, then closely spaced, tuned in unison or octaves and intended to played together.
Hyponyms
  • bird course
  • crash course
  • due course
  • massive open online course (MOOC)
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

Verb

course (third-person singular simple present courses, present participle coursing, simple past and past participle coursed)

  1. To run or flow (especially of liquids and more particularly blood).
    The oil coursed through the engine.
    Blood pumped around the human body courses throughout all its veins and arteries.
    • 2013, Martina Hyde, “Is the pope Catholic?”, The Guardian, 20 September 2013[1]
      He is a South American, so perhaps revolutionary spirit courses through Francis’s veins. But what, pray, does the Catholic church want with doubt?
  2. (transitive) To run through or over.
  3. (transitive) To pursue by tracking or estimating the course taken by one’s prey; to follow or chase after.
  4. (transitive) To cause to chase after or pursue game.
    to course greyhounds after deer
Translations

Etymology 2

Clipping of of course

Adverb

course (not comparable)

  1. (colloquial) Alternative form of of course

Anagrams

  • Couser, Crouse, Crusoe, cerous, coures, crouse, source

French

Etymology

From Old French cours, from Latin cursus (course of a race), from currō (run), with influence of Italian corsa.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kuʁs/

Noun

course f (plural courses)

  1. run, running
  2. race
  3. errand

Usage notes

  • course is a false friend, it does not mean “course”. To translate the English word course to French, use cours.

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Romanian: cursă

Further reading

  • “course” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • coeurs, cœurs
  • coures
  • écrous
  • source

Norman

Etymology

From Old French cours, from Latin cursus (course of a race), from currō (run).

Noun

course f (plural courses)

  1. (Jersey) course


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: līn, IPA(key): /laɪn/
  • Rhymes: -aɪn

Etymology 1

From Middle English line, lyne, from Old English līne (line, cable, rope, hawser, series, row, rule, direction), from Proto-West Germanic *līnā, from Proto-Germanic *līnǭ (line, rope, flaxen cord, thread), from Proto-Germanic *līną (flax, linen), from Proto-Indo-European *līno- (flax).

Influenced in Middle English by Middle French ligne (line), from Latin linea. More at linen.

The oldest sense of the word is “rope, cord, thread”; from this the senses “path”, “continuous mark” were derived.

Noun

line (plural lines)

  1. A path through two or more points (compare ‘segment’); a continuous mark, including as made by a pen; any path, curved or straight.
    • So this was my future home, I thought! [] Backed by towering hills, the but faintly discernible purple line of the French boundary off to the southwest, a sky of palest Gobelin flecked with fat, fleecy little clouds, it in truth looked a dear little city; the city of one’s dreams.
    1. (geometry) An infinitely extending one-dimensional figure that has no curvature; one that has length but not breadth or thickness.
      Synonym: straight line
    2. (geometry, informal) A line segment; a continuous finite segment of such a figure.
      Synonym: line segment
    3. (graph theory) An edge of a graph.
    4. (geography) A circle of latitude or of longitude, as represented on a map.
    5. (geography, ‘the line’ or ‘equinoctial line’) The equator.
      • 1789, Olaudah Equiano, The Interesting Narrative, vol. I, ch. 1:
        Benin [] is situated nearly under the line, and extends along the coast about 170 miles [] .
    6. (music) One of the straight horizontal and parallel prolonged strokes on and between which the notes are placed.
    7. (cricket) The horizontal path of a ball towards the batsman (see also length).
    8. (soccer) The goal line.
    9. (motoring) A particular path taken by a vehicle when driving a bend or corner in the road.
  2. A rope, cord, string, or thread, of any thickness.
  3. A hose or pipe, of any size.
    • 1973, Final Environmental Statement for the Geothermal Leasing Program (US department of the interior):
      There is the possible hazard of an oil spill in case the line breaks but normal pipeline maintenance and safety measures, etc., are designed to prevent large or long continued spillage.
    • 1981 October, Popular Science, volume 219, number 4, page 113:
      To the end of the metal fuel line (where it fits into the carb) you attach a four-foot length of flexible fuel line.
  4. Direction, path.
  5. The wire connecting one telegraphic station with another, a telephone or internet cable between two points: a telephone or network connection.
  6. A clothesline.
  7. A letter, a written form of communication.
    Synonyms: epistle, letter, note
  8. A connected series of public conveyances, as a roadbed or railway track; and hence, an established arrangement for forwarding merchandise, etc.
  9. (military) A trench or rampart, or the non-physical demarcation of the extent of the territory occupied by specified forces.
  10. The exterior limit of a figure or territory: a boundary, contour, or outline; a demarcation.
  11. A long tape or ribbon marked with units for measuring; a tape measure.
  12. (obsolete) A measuring line or cord.
    • The carpenter stretcheth out his rule; he marketh it out with a line; he fitteth it with planes, and he marketh it out with the compass, and maketh it after the figure of a man, according to the beauty of a man; that it may remain in the house.
  13. That which was measured by a line, such as a field or any piece of land set apart; hence, allotted place of abode.
    • The lines are fallen unto me in pleasant places; yea, I have a goodly heritage.
  14. A threadlike crease or wrinkle marking the face, hand, or body; hence, a characteristic mark.
  15. Lineament; feature; figure (of one’s body).
  16. A more-or-less straight sequence of people, objects, etc., either arranged as a queue or column and often waiting to be processed or dealt with, or arranged abreast of one another in a row (and contrasted with a column), as in a military formation. [from mid-16thc.]
    Synonyms: (Canada) lineup, (UK, Ireland) queue
  17. (military) The regular infantry of an army, as distinguished from militia, guards, volunteer corps, cavalry, artillery, etc.
  18. A series or succession of ancestors or descendants of a given person; a family or race; compare lineage.
    • Their line is gone out through all the earth, and their words to the end of the world. In them hath he set a tabernacle for the sun.
  19. A small amount of text. Specifically:
    1. A written or printed row of letters, words, numbers, or other text, especially a row of words extending across a page or column, or a blank in place of such text.
      Synonym: row
    2. A verse (in poetry).
    3. A sentence of dialogue, especially [from the later 19thc.] in a play, movie, or the like.
    4. A lie or exaggeration, especially one told to gain another’s approval or prevent losing it.
  20. Course of conduct, thought, occupation, or policy; method of argument; department of industry, trade, or intellectual activity. [from earlier 17thc.]
  21. The official, stated position (or set of positions) of an individual or group, particularly a political or religious faction. [from later 19thc.]
  22. (slang) Information about or understanding of something. (Mostly restricted to the expressions get a line on, have a line on, and give a line on.)
  23. A set of products or services sold by a business, or by extension, the business itself. [from earlier 19thc.]
  24. (stock exchange) A number of shares taken by a jobber.
  25. A measure of length:
    1. (historical) A tsarist-era Russian unit of measure, approximately equal to one tenth of an English inch, used especially when measuring the calibre of firearms.
    2. One twelfth of an inch.
    3. One fortieth of an inch.
  26. (historical) A maxwell, a unit of magnetic flux.
  27. (baseball, slang, 1800s, with “the”) The batter’s box.
  28. (fencing) The position in which the fencers hold their swords.
    Synonym: line of engagement
  29. (engineering) Proper relative position or adjustment (of parts, not as to design or proportion, but with reference to smooth working).
  30. A small path-shaped portion or serving of a powdery illegal drug, especially cocaine.
  31. (obsolete) Instruction; doctrine.
    • Their line is gone out through all the earth, and their words to the end of the world. In them hath he set a tabernacle for the sun.
  32. (genetics) Population of cells derived from a single cell and containing the same genetic makeup.
  33. (perfusion line) a set composed of a spike, a drip chamber, a clamp, a Y-injection site, a three-way stopcock and a catheter.
  34. (ice hockey) A group of forwards that play together.
  35. (Australian rules football) A set of positions in a team which play in a similar position on the field; in a traditional team, consisting of three players and acting as one of six such sets in the team.
  36. (medicine, colloquial) A vascular catheter.
Derived terms
Related terms
  • (geometry) curve, point, segment
  • lineage
  • lineal
  • linear
Descendants
  • Scottish Gaelic: loidhne
Translations

Verb

line (third-person singular simple present lines, present participle lining, simple past and past participle lined)

  1. (transitive) To place (objects) into a line (usually used with “up”); to form into a line; to align.
    (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  2. (transitive) To place persons or things along the side of for security or defense; to strengthen by adding; to fortify.
  3. (transitive) To form a line along.
  4. (transitive) To mark with a line or lines, to cover with lines.
  5. (transitive, obsolete) To represent by lines; to delineate; to portray.
  6. (transitive) To read or repeat line by line.
    • 1897, Daniel Webster Davis, “De Linin’ ub de Hymns”, quoted in Jerma A. Jackson, “Exuberance or Restraint: Music and Religion after Reconstruction”, in Singing in My Soul: Black Gospel Music in a Secular Age, Chapel Hill, N.C.: University of North Carolina Press, 2004, ISBN 978-0-8078-2860-1, page 15:
      De young folks say ’tain’t stylish to lin’ ’um no mo’; / Dat deys got edikashun, an’ dey wants us all to know / Dey like to hab dar singin’-books a-holin’ fore dar eyes, / An’ sing de hymns right straight along “to manshuns in de skies”.
  7. (intransitive, baseball) To hit a line drive; to hit a line drive which is caught for an out. Compare fly and ground.
  8. (transitive) To track (wild bees) to their nest by following their line of flight.
  9. (transitive) To measure.
Derived terms
  • line up
  • underline
Translations

Etymology 2

Old English līn (flax, linen, cloth). For more information, see the entry linen.

Alternative forms

  • lin

Noun

line (uncountable)

  1. (obsolete) Flax; linen, particularly the longer fiber of flax.
    • a. 1818, J. C. Atkinson (ed.), North Riding Record Society (publisher), Quarter sessions records VIII p. 52 (compilation of historical records published in 1890, as quoted in the English Dialect Dictionary in 1902):
      To spin 2 lb. of line.
    • 1837, Everett, S. Hick 195:
      Which proved fatal to the line or flax crops.
    • 1858, Journal of the Statistical Society of London, page 409:
      1641.—14 yards of femble cloth, 12s. ; 8 yards of linen, 6s. 8d. ; 20 yards of harden, 10s. ; 5 linen sheets, 1l. ; 7 linen pillow bears, 8s. ; 2 femble sheets and a line hard sheet, 10s. ; 3 linen towels, 4s. ; 6 lin curtains and a vallance, 12s. ; []
    • 1869, Dixon, Borrowdale, 2:
      T’burring o’ t’woo’ an’ line wheels,
Translations

Verb

line (third-person singular simple present lines, present participle lining, simple past and past participle lined)

  1. (transitive) To cover the inner surface of (something), originally especially with linen.
  2. To reinforce (the back of a book) with glue and glued scrap material such as fabric or paper.
  3. (transitive) To fill or supply (something), as a purse with money.
Derived terms

(terms derived from the verb “line”):

  • line one’s pockets
Translations

Etymology 3

Borrowed from Middle French ligner.

Verb

line (third-person singular simple present lines, present participle lining, simple past and past participle lined)

  1. (transitive, now rare, of a dog) To copulate with, to impregnate.
    • 1868 September, The Country Gentleman’s Magazine, page 292:
      Bedlamite was a black dog, and although it may be safely asserted that he lined upwards of 100 bitches of all colours, red, white, and blue, all his produce were black.
Translations

Gallery

References

line in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • LEIN, Neil, Niel, Nile, lien

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English line.

Noun

line f (invariable)

  1. line management
  2. editing (of a TV programme)

Related terms

  • off-line
  • on-line

Anagrams

  • lenì

Latin

Verb

line

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of linō

References

  • line in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • lyne, lin, lyene
  • ligne (influenced by Old French ligne)

Etymology 1

From Old English līne, from Proto-Germanic *līnǭ. Some forms and meanings are from Old French ligne.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /liːn(ə)/

Noun

line (plural lines)

  1. rope, cord
  2. line, rule, ruler, measure
  3. (figuratively) rule, direction, command, edict
  4. line, straight mark; also a fictitious line
  5. (written) line, verse
Descendants
  • English: line

References

  • “līne, n.(1).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-03-23.

Etymology 2

From Old English līn.

Noun

line (uncountable)

  1. Alternative form of lyne

References

  • “lin,, adj.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 29 April 2018.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /²liːnə/

Etymology 1

From Latin linea

Alternative forms

  • linje

Noun

line f (definite singular lina, indefinite plural liner, definite plural linene)

  1. a line (a continuous mark through two or more points; a succession of ancestors or descendants; the stated position of an individual or group)
Derived terms
  • kystline
  • skiljeline

Etymology 2

From Old Norse lína

Noun

line f (definite singular lina, indefinite plural liner, definite plural linene)

  1. a line (a strong rope, cord, string, wire)

References

  • “line” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *līnǭ (line, rope, flaxen cord, thread), from Proto-Germanic *līną (flax, linen), from Proto-Indo-European *līno- (flax). Akin to Old High German līna (line) (German Leine (rope)), Middle Dutch līne (rope, cord) (Dutch lijn (rope)), Old Norse līna (cord, rope) (Danish line (rope, cord)), Old English līn (flax, linen, cloth).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈliː.ne/

Noun

līne f

  1. line, rope, cable
  2. row, series
  3. direction, rule

Declension

Related terms

  • līn
  • līnen, linnen

Descendants

  • Middle English: line, lyne
    • English: line

Phuthi

Etymology

From Proto-Nguni *niná.

Pronoun

liné

  1. you, you all; second-person plural absolute pronoun.

Spanish

Noun

line m (plural lines)

  1. (rugby) lineout

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