cower vs huddle what difference

what is difference between cower and huddle

English

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈkaʊɚ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈkaʊə/
  • Rhymes: -aʊ.ə(ɹ)

Etymology 1

From Middle English cowre, couren, curen, from Middle Low German kûren (to lie in wait; linger) or from North Germanic (Icelandic kúra (to doze)). Cognate with German kauern (to squat), Dutch koeren (to keep watch (in a cowered position)), Serbo-Croatian kutriti (to lie in a bent position). Unrelated to coward, which is of Latin origin.

Verb

cower (third-person singular simple present cowers, present participle cowering, simple past and past participle cowered)

  1. (intransitive) To crouch or cringe, or to avoid or shy away from something, in fear.
    He’d be useless in war. He’d just cower in his bunker until the enemy came in and shot him, or until the war was over.
    • 1700, John Dryden, “The Cock and the Fox”, in Fables, Ancient and Modern, published March 1700:
      Our dame sits cowering o’er a kitchen fire.
  2. (intransitive, archaic) To crouch in general.
    • 1764, Oliver Goldsmith, The Traveller:
      Some sterner virtues o’er the mountain’s breast
      May sit, like falcons, cowering on the nest
    • 1801, Robert Southey, Thalaba the Destroyer:
      The mother bird had mov’d not,
      But cowering o’er her nestlings,
      Sate confident and fearless,
      And watch’d the wonted guest.
  3. (transitive) To cause to cower; to frighten into submission.
Translations
See also
  • coward
  • cowardice

Etymology 2

Verb

cower (third-person singular simple present cowers, present participle cowering, simple past and past participle cowered)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To cherish with care.

Anagrams

  • Crowe


English

Etymology

From Middle English *hudelen, alteration (due to hudels, hidels (hiding place), see hiddle) of *huderen, hoderen (to cover; press together; huddle), a frequentative form of Middle English huden, hiden (to hide), equivalent to hide +‎ -le and/or hide +‎ -er. Compare Low German huderken (to brood; coddle; nurse; lull children to sleep).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhʌdəl/
  • Rhymes: -ʌdəl

Noun

huddle (plural huddles)

  1. A dense and disorderly crowd.
  2. (American football) A brief meeting of all the players from one team that are on the field with the purpose of planning the following play.
  3. (bridge) A hesitation during play to think about one’s next move.

Translations

Verb

huddle (third-person singular simple present huddles, present participle huddling, simple past and past participle huddled)

  1. (intransitive) To crowd together.
    • 1912: Edgar Rice Burroughs, Tarzan of the Apes, Chapter 4
      During all these operations the apes who had entered sat huddled near the door watching their chief, while those outside strained and crowded to catch a glimpse of what transpired within.
  2. (intransitive) To curl one’s legs up to the chest and keep one’s arms close to the torso; to crouch; to assume a position similar to that of an embryo in the womb.
  3. To get together and discuss a topic.
    • 2012 November 2, Ken Belson, “[1],” New York Times (retrieved 2 November 2012):
      George Hirsch, chairman of the board of Road Runners, said officials huddled all day Friday, hoping to devise an alternate race. They considered replacing the marathon with a race that would comprise the final 10 miles of marathon, starting at the base of the Queensboro 59th Street Bridge on the Manhattan side. But that was not deemed plausible, Mr. Hirsch said.
  4. (intransitive, American football) To form a huddle.
  5. (transitive) To crowd (things) together; to mingle confusedly; to assemble without order or system.
    • Our adversary, huddling several suppositions together, [] makes a medley and confusion.
  6. (transitive) To do, make, or put, in haste or roughly; hence, to do imperfectly; usually with a following preposition or adverb (huddle on, huddle up, huddle together).
    • 1845, John Henry Newman, Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine
      Huddle up a peace.
    • Let him forecast his work with timely care, / Which else is huddled when the skies are fair.
    • 1728, Jonathan Swift, The Journal of a Modern Lady
      Now, in all haste, they huddle on / Their hoods, their cloaks, and get them gone.
  7. (bridge, intransitive) To hesitate during play while thinking about one’s next move.

Translations

Adjective

huddle (comparative more huddle, superlative most huddle)

  1. Muted, as if emitted by a huddled embryo
    • 1931, William Faulkner, Sanctuary, Library of America, 1985, p.51:
      Gowan snored, each respiration chocking to a huddle fall, as though he would never breathe again.

Translations


Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial