coy vs overmodest what difference

what is difference between coy and overmodest

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɔɪ/
  • Rhymes: -ɔɪ
  • Homophone: koi

Etymology 1

From Middle English coy, from Old French coi, earlier quei (quiet, still), from Latin quietus (resting, at rest). Doublet of quiet.

Adjective

coy (comparative coyer, superlative coyest)

  1. (dated) Bashful, shy, retiring.
  2. (archaic) Quiet, reserved, modest.
  3. Reluctant to give details about something sensitive; notably prudish.
  4. Pretending shyness or modesty, especially in an insincere or flirtatious way.
    • 1981, A. D. Hope, “His Coy Mistress to Mr. Marvell,” A Book of Answers:
      The ill-bred miss, the bird-brained Jill, / May simper and be coy at will; / A lady, sir, as you will find, / Keeps counsel, or she speaks her mind, / Means what she says and scorns to fence / And palter with feigned innocence.
  5. Soft, gentle, hesitating.
    • 1594, William Shakespeare, The Rape of Lucrece
      Enforced hate, / Instead of love’s coy touch, shall rudely tear thee.
Derived terms
  • coyly
  • coyness
Related terms
Translations

Verb

coy (third-person singular simple present coys, present participle coying, simple past and past participle coyed)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To caress, pet; to coax, entice.
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To calm or soothe.
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To allure; to decoy.

Etymology 2

Compare decoy.

Noun

coy (plural coys)

  1. A trap from which waterfowl may be hunted.

Etymology 3

Abbreviation of company.

Noun

coy (plural coys)

  1. (military) A company

References

  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “coy”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Anagrams

  • CYO

Huave

Etymology 1

Noun

coy

  1. rheumatism

References

  • Stairs Kreger, Glenn Albert; Scharfe de Stairs, Emily Florence; Olvaries Oviedo, Proceso; Ponce Villanueva, Tereso; Comonfort Llave, Lorenzo (1981) Diccionario huave de San Mateo del Mar (Serie de vocabularios indígenas “Mariano Silva y Aceves”; 24)‎[1] (in Spanish), México, D.F.: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, pages 88, 205, 268

Etymology 2

Noun

coy

  1. rabbit

References

  • Stairs Kreger, Glenn Albert; Scharfe de Stairs, Emily Florence; Olvaries Oviedo, Proceso; Ponce Villanueva, Tereso; Comonfort Llave, Lorenzo (1981) Diccionario huave de San Mateo del Mar (Serie de vocabularios indígenas “Mariano Silva y Aceves”; 24)‎[2] (in Spanish), México, D.F.: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, pages 88, 212, 416

Etymology 3

Noun

coy

  1. short tail, stub

References

  • Stairs Kreger, Glenn Albert; Scharfe de Stairs, Emily Florence; Olvaries Oviedo, Proceso; Ponce Villanueva, Tereso; Comonfort Llave, Lorenzo (1981) Diccionario huave de San Mateo del Mar (Serie de vocabularios indígenas “Mariano Silva y Aceves”; 24)‎[3] (in Spanish), México, D.F.: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, pages 88, 211, 265

Middle French

Alternative forms

  • coi
  • quoy

Etymology

From Old French coi, from Vulgar Latin quetus, from Latin quietus.

Adjective

coy m (feminine singular coye, masculine plural coys, feminine plural coyes)

  1. (of a person) calm; composed

Descendants

  • French: coi

Spanish

Etymology

From Dutch kooi (bunk). Doublet of gavia and cávea.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈkoi/, [ˈkoi̯]

Noun

coy m (plural coyes or cois)

  1. (nautical) a type of hammock made of sailcloth used as a makeshift bunk

Wastek

Noun

coy

  1. rabbit


English

Etymology

over- +‎ modest

Adjective

overmodest (comparative more overmodest, superlative most overmodest)

  1. Excessively modest.

Derived terms

  • overmodestly

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