cram vs jam what difference

what is difference between cram and jam

English

Etymology

From Middle English crammen, from Old English crammian (to cram; stuff), from Proto-West Germanic *krammōn, from Proto-Germanic *krammōną, a secondary verb derived from *krimmaną (to stuff), from Proto-Indo-European *ger- (to assemble; collect; gather). Compare Old English crimman (to cram; stuff; insert; press; bruise), Icelandic kremja (to squeeze; crush; bruise).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɹæm/
  • Rhymes: -æm

Verb

cram (third-person singular simple present crams, present participle cramming, simple past and past participle crammed)

  1. (transitive) To press, force, or drive, particularly in filling, or in thrusting one thing into another; to stuff; to fill to superfluity.
  2. (transitive) To fill with food to satiety; to stuff.
  3. (transitive) To put hastily through an extensive course of memorizing or study, as in preparation for an examination.
  4. (intransitive) To study hard; to swot.
  5. (intransitive) To eat greedily, and to satiety; to stuff oneself.
  6. (intransitive, dated, British slang) To lie; to intentionally not tell the truth.
  7. (transitive, dated, British slang) To make (a person) believe false or exaggerated tales.

Derived terms

  • crammable, crammer, cram school, cram-full, cram session

Translations

Noun

cram (countable and uncountable, plural crams)

  1. The act of cramming (forcing or stuffing something).
  2. Information hastily memorized.
  3. (weaving) A warp having more than two threads passing through each dent or split of the reed.
  4. (dated, British slang) A lie; a falsehood.
  5. (uncountable) A mathematical board game in which players take turns placing dominoes horizontally or vertically until no more can be placed, the loser being the player who cannot continue.
  6. A small friendship book with limited space for people to enter their information.
    • 2017, Mark Duffett, Fan Identities and Practices in Context: Dedicated to Music (page 194)
      Regular friendship books had a variety of variations, such as slams, crams, and decos.

Synonyms

  • (lie): see Thesaurus:lie

Translations

Anagrams

  • MRCA, Marc, macr-, marc, mrca


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, US) IPA(key): /ˈdʒæm/
  • (Southern England, Australia) IPA(key): /ˈdʒæːm/
  • – fruit spread
  • – verb
  • Rhymes: -æm
  • Homophone: jamb

Etymology 1

First attested in the early 18th c. as a verb meaning “to press, be pressed, be wedged in”. Eventually onomatopoeic, perhaps identical with Middle English chammen, champen (to bite, gnash one’s teeth), whence modern champ, chomp.

Noun

jam (countable and uncountable, plural jams)

  1. A sweet mixture of fruit boiled with sugar and allowed to congeal. Often spread on bread or toast or used in jam tarts.
    Synonyms: (US) conserve, jelly, preserve
  2. (countable) A difficult situation.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:difficult situation
  3. (countable) Blockage, congestion.
  4. (countable, popular music) An informal, impromptu performance or rehearsal.
  5. (countable, by extension, informal) A song; a track.
    • 2001, Jet (volume 100, number 22, page 25)
      The result is an outstanding assortment of sophisticated, sexy and hip-hop-tinged R&B grooves, ballads and party jams.
  6. (countable, by extension) An informal event where people brainstorm and collaborate on projects.
  7. (uncountable, slang) That which one particularly prefers, desires, enjoys, or cares about.
  8. (countable, baseball) A difficult situation for a pitcher or defending team.
  9. (countable, basketball) A forceful dunk.
  10. (countable, roller derby) A play during which points can be scored.
  11. (climbing, countable) Any of several maneuvers requiring wedging of an extremity into a tight space.
  12. (Britain, slang) luck.
  13. (slang) sexual relations or the contemplation of them.
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Czech: džem
  • Japanese: ジャム (jamu)
  • Korean: (jaem)
  • Polish: dżem
  • Russian: джем (džem)
  • Serbo-Croatian: džȅm, џе̏м
  • Slovak: džem
Translations
See also
  • jelly
  • marmalade

Verb

jam (third-person singular simple present jams, present participle jamming, simple past and past participle jammed)

  1. To get something stuck, often (though not necessarily) in a confined space.
    • 1719, Daniel Defoe, Robinson Crusoe, London: W. Taylor, 3rd edition, 1719, p. 226,[1]
      The Ship, which by its Building was Spanish, stuck fast, jaum’d in between two Rocks; all the Stern and Quarter of her was beaten to Pieces with the Sea []
  2. To brusquely force something into a space; cram, squeeze.
    • 1779, George Colman, Farewell Epilogue, spoken at Wynnstay after the representation of Cymbeline and The Spanish Barber, 22 January, 1779, in Prose on Several Occasions: Accompanied with Some Pieces in Verse, London: T. Cadel, 1787, Volume 3, p. 283,[2]
      Since the new post-horse tax, I dare engage
      That some folks here have travell’d in the Stage:
      Jamm’d in at midnight, in cold winter weather,
      The crouded passengers are glew’d together.
  3. To cause congestion or blockage. Often used with “up”
  4. To block or confuse a broadcast signal.
  5. (baseball) To throw a pitch at or near the batter’s hands.
  6. (music) To play music (especially improvisation as a group, or an informal unrehearsed session).
  7. To injure a finger or toe by sudden compression of the digit’s tip.
  8. (roller derby) To attempt to score points.
  9. (nautical, transitive) To bring (a vessel) so close to the wind that half her upper sails are laid aback.
    • 1887, William Clark Russell, The Golden Hope
      It won’t do to jam her,” answered Stone ;” but it might be worth findin’ out if th’ Hope won’t lie closer than t’ other can.” Half a point —-“
  10. (Canada, informal) To give up on a date or some joint endeavour; stand up, chicken out, jam out.
Synonyms
  • ram
Derived terms
  • (to squeeze into a small space): jam-pack
  • jammer
  • jam band
  • jam session
Translations

Etymology 2

Persian or Hindi, meaning “garment, robe;” see جامه(garment). Related to pajamas.

Noun

jam (plural jams)

  1. (dated) A kind of frock for children.

Etymology 3

Noun

jam (plural jams)

  1. (mining) Alternative form of jamb

References

  • jam on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • jam at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • jam in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • JMA, Maj, Maj., maj, maj.

Albanian

Etymology

From Proto-Albanian *esmi, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ésmi (I am, I exist), identical with Ancient Greek εἰμί (eimí), Sanskrit अस्मि (ásmi), English am. Aorist qeshë from Proto-Indo-European *kʷel- (to turn, revolve), with a semantic development similar to Germanic *werdan (to become), from Proto-Indo-European *wert- (to turn).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /jam/

Verb

jam (first-person singular past tense qeshë, participle qenë)

  1. to be

Conjugation

References


Czech

Etymology

From Portuguese inhame or Spanish iñame, both likely of West African origin.

Noun

jam m

  1. yam (any Dioscorea vine)

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English jam.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʒɛm/
  • Hyphenation: jam
  • Rhymes: -ɛm

Noun

jam m (plural jams, diminutive jammetje n)

  1. (chiefly Netherlands) jam (congealed sweet mixture of conserved fruits)

Synonyms

  • confituur
  • marmelade

Derived terms

  • aardbeienjam
  • jampot
  • kersenjam

Esperanto

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin iam.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /jam/
  • Hyphenation: jam
  • Audio:

Adverb

jam

  1. already, prior to some time

Garo

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

jam

  1. granary, storehouse

Highland Popoluca

Noun

jam

  1. lime

References

  • Elson, Benjamin F.; Gutiérrez G., Donaciano (1999) Diccionario popoluca de la Sierra, Veracruz (Serie de vocabularios y diccionarios indígenas “Mariano Silva y Aceves”; 41)‎[3] (in Spanish), Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, A.C., →ISBN, page 74

Indonesian

Etymology

From Malay jam, from Sanskrit याम (yāma, time).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈd͡ʒam]
  • Hyphenation: jam

Noun

jam (first-person possessive jamku, second-person possessive jammu, third-person possessive jamnya)

  1. hour (Time period of sixty minutes)
  2. clock (instrument to measure or keep track of time)
  3. (colloquial) time, particular moment or hour; the appropriate moment or hour for something
    Synonyms: pukul, saat, waktu

Further reading

  • “jam” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Interlingua

Adverb

jam (not comparable)

  1. already

Javanese

Etymology

Ultimately from Sanskrit याम (yāma)

Noun

jam

  1. clock

Latgalian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈjam/
  • Hyphenation: jam

Pronoun

jam

  1. dative singular of jis

References

  • Nicole Nau (2011) A short grammar of Latgalian, München: LINCOM GmbH, →ISBN, page 37

Latin

Adverb

jam (not comparable)

  1. Alternative form of iam

References

  • jam in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Lindu

Noun

jam

  1. time
  2. hour
  3. clock

Lithuanian

Pronoun

jam m

  1. (third-person singular) dative form of jis.
    • 2007, Jurga (Jurga Šeduikytė), Angelai
      Jo balti sparnai man tinka
      Jam savo šarvus dovanoju

      His white wings suit me
      I present to him my armor

Malay

Etymology

From Sanskrit याम (yāma, time).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [d͡ʒam]
  • Rhymes: -d͡ʒam, -am

Noun

jam (Jawi spelling جم‎, plural jamjam, informal 1st possessive jamku, impolite 2nd possessive jammu, 3rd possessive jamnya)

  1. hour (Time period of sixty minutes)
  2. clock (instrument to measure or keep track of time)

Further reading

  • “jam” in Pusat Rujukan Persuratan Melayu | Malay Literary Reference Centre, Kuala Lumpur: Dewan Bahasa dan Pustaka, 2017.

North Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian . Cognate with West Frisian jimme

Pronoun

jam

  1. you (plural)
  2. your (plural)

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /jam/

Noun

jam f

  1. genitive plural of jama

Pronoun

jam

  1. (informal, sometimes proscribed) Combined form of ja +‎ -m (first person singular pronoun + verb suffix).

Further reading

  • jam in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Slovene

Noun

jam

  1. genitive dual/plural of jama

Swedish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /jɑːm/

Noun

jam n

  1. meow (sound of a cat)

Declension

Related terms

  • jama

Anagrams

  • Maj, maj

Welsh

Etymology

From English jam.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /d͡ʒam/

Noun

jam m (plural jamiau, not mutable)

  1. jam
    Synonym: cyffaith

Further reading

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “jam”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

West Frisian

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

jam c (plural jams)

  1. jam, fruit preserves

Alternative forms

  • sjem

Further reading

  • “jam (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial