crave vs lust what difference

what is difference between crave and lust

English

Etymology

From Middle English craven, from Old English crafian (to crave, ask, implore, demand, summon), from Proto-Germanic *krafjaną (to demand). Cognate with Danish kræve (to demand, require), Swedish kräva (to crave, demand), Icelandic krefja (to demand).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: krāv, IPA(key): /kɹeɪv/
  • Rhymes: -eɪv

Verb

crave (third-person singular simple present craves, present participle craving, simple past and past participle craved)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To desire strongly, so as to satisfy an appetite; to long or yearn for.
  2. (transitive) To ask for earnestly; to beg; to claim.
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To call for; to require as a course of action.

Derived terms

  • craving
  • cravingly
  • cravingness

Translations

Noun

crave (plural craves)

  1. (law, Scotland) A formal application to a court to make a particular order.

References

  • Kroonen, Guus (2013) Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Germanic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 11), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, s. v. “*krabēn-” and “*krēbi-”.

Anagrams

  • Caver, carve, caver, varec

Portuguese

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: cra‧ve
  • Rhymes: -avi, -avɨ

Verb

crave

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of cravar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of cravar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of cravar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of cravar

Sardinian

Alternative forms

  • crae, giae, jave
  • crai (campidanese)

Etymology

From earlier *clave, from Latin clāvis, clāvem, from Proto-Italic *klāwis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /craβe/

Noun

crave f (plural craves)

  1. key


English

Etymology

From Middle English lust, from Old English lust (lust, pleasure, longing), from Proto-Germanic *lustuz. Akin to Old Saxon, Dutch lust, Old Frisian, Old High German, German Lust, Swedish lust, Danish lyst, Icelandic lyst, Old Norse losti, Gothic ???????????????????????? (lustus), and perhaps to Sanskrit लष् (laṣ), लषति (laṣati, to desire) and Albanian lushë (bitch, savage dog, promiscuous woman), or to English loose. Confer list (to please), listless.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lʌst/
  • Rhymes: -ʌst

Noun

lust (countable and uncountable, plural lusts)

  1. A feeling of strong desire, especially such a feeling driven by sexual arousal.
  2. (archaic) A general want or longing, not necessarily sexual.
    • 1608/1611, Joseph Hall, Epistles
      My lust to devotion is little.
  3. (archaic) A delightful cause of joy, pleasure.
    • c. 1521, John Skelton, “Speke Parott”:
      Pompe, pryde, honour, ryches & worldly luſt
      Parrot ſayth playnly, ſhall tourne all to duſt
  4. (obsolete) virility; vigour; active power

Synonyms

  • (strong desire): See also Thesaurus:craving or Thesaurus:lust
  • (general want or longing): See also Thesaurus:desire
  • (delightful cause of joy): See also Thesaurus:pleasure
  • (active power): lustihood, potency, vigour, virility

Derived terms

Related terms

  • wanderlust

Translations

Verb

lust (third-person singular simple present lusts, present participle lusting, simple past and past participle lusted)

  1. (intransitive, usually in the phrase “lust after”) To look at or watch with a strong desire, especially of a sexual nature.

Translations

Anagrams

  • LUTs, UTSL, slut, ults

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lʏst/
  • Hyphenation: lust
  • Rhymes: -ʏst

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch lust, from Old Dutch *lust, from Proto-Germanic *lustuz.

Noun

lust m (plural lusten, diminutive lustje n)

  1. lust, desire (especially sexual, but also more generally)
  2. object of desire
  3. pleasure, joy
    Het was een lust om naar hem te kijken en te luisteren.

    It was a pleasure watching and listening to him.
  4. (usually in the plural) benefit, advantage
  5. a taste for, strong tendency to
Derived terms
  • bloedlust
  • eetlust
  • lusteloos
  • lusthof
  • lustig
  • lustobject
  • lustmoord
  • lustoord
  • lustprieel
  • lusttuin
  • moordlust
  • roemlust
  • strijdlust
  • wellust
Descendants
  • Negerhollands: lyst

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

lust

  1. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of lusten
  2. imperative of lusten

Estonian

Etymology

From Middle Low German lust. Cognate to German Lust and Finnish lusti

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈlusʲt/

Noun

lust (genitive lusti, partitive lusti)

  1. pleasure, fun, joy, lust (non-sexual)
    Nad teevad seda niisama lusti pärast.

    They’re doing it just for fun.

Declension

Descendants

  • Ingrian: lusti (beautiful, funny)

Middle Dutch

Etymology

From Old Dutch *lust, from Proto-Germanic *lustuz.

Noun

lust m or f

  1. enjoyment, pleasure
  2. lust, desire
  3. hunger, desire to eat

Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Derived terms

  • onlust

Descendants

  • Dutch: lust

Further reading

  • “lust”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “lust (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN, page I

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *lustuz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lust/

Noun

lust m

  1. desire, pleasure, appetite, lust

Declension

Descendants

  • Middle English: lust
    • English: lust

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse losti (late Old Norse lyst), from Middle Low German lust lüst, lyst, from Old Saxon lust, from Proto-Germanic *lustuz.

Pronunciation

Noun

lust c

  1. (uncountable) lust (a mood of desire), joy, a keen interest
  2. a desire (for something specific)

Declension

Related terms

  • förlusta
  • förlustelse
  • läslust
  • lusta
  • lustgas
  • lusthus
  • lustig
  • lustjakt
  • lustresa
  • lustspel
  • lysten
  • lystnad
  • söklust

Anagrams

  • luts, slut

West Frisian

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

lust c (plural lusten)

  1. desire, appetite
  2. lust, sexual desire

Derived terms

  • ytlust

Further reading

  • “lust”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial