criminate vs impeach what difference

what is difference between criminate and impeach

English

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin crimino, criminatus.

Verb

criminate (third-person singular simple present criminates, present participle criminating, simple past and past participle criminated)

  1. (transitive) To accuse (someone) of a crime; to incriminate. [from 17th c.]
    • 1791, Ann Radcliffe, The Romance of the Forest, Penguin 1999, p. 331:
      ‘I am now under confinement in this place for debt; but if you obtain [] a condition from the judge that what I reveal shall not criminate myself, I will make discoveries that shall confound that same Marquis [] .’
    • 1861, Elizabeth Gaskell, The Grey Woman
      In Germany, I had heard little of this terrible gang, and I had paid no greater heed to the stories related once or twice about them in Carlsruhe than one does to tales about ogres. But here in their very haunts, I learnt the full amount of the terror they inspired. No one would be legally responsible for any evidence criminating the murderer.
  2. (transitive, now rare) To rebuke or censure (someone). [from 17th c.]

Derived terms

Related terms

  • crimination

Translations

Anagrams

  • anticrime, antimeric, carminite, macrinite, metrician

Latin

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /kriː.miˈnaː.te/, [kɾiːmɪˈnäːt̪ɛ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /kri.miˈna.te/, [krimiˈnɑːt̪ɛ]

Verb

crīmināte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of crīminō


English

Alternative forms

  • empeach (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English empechen, borrowed from Anglo-Norman empecher, from Old French empeechier (to hinder), from Latin impedicāre (to fetter). Cognate with French empêcher (to prevent).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪmˈpiːtʃ/
  • Rhymes: -iːtʃ

Verb

impeach (third-person singular simple present impeaches, present participle impeaching, simple past and past participle impeached)

  1. To hinder, impede, or prevent.
    • 1612, John Davies, Discoverie of the True Causes why Ireland was never entirely subdued
      These ungracious practices of his sons did impeach his journey to the Holy Land.
    • I was afraid the same defluxion of Salt Rheum which fell from my Temples into my Throat in Oxford, and distilling upon the Uvula, impeached my Utterance a little to this Day
  2. To bring a legal proceeding against a public official.
    President Clinton was impeached by the House in November 1998, but since the Senate acquitted him, he was not removed from office.
  3. To charge with impropriety; to discredit; to call into question.
  4. (law) To demonstrate in court that a testimony under oath contradicts another testimony from the same person, usually one taken during deposition.

Derived terms

  • impeachment

Translations

Anagrams

  • aphemic

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