cringe vs wince what difference

what is difference between cringe and wince

English

Etymology

The verb is derived from Middle English crengen (to bend in a haughty manner; to condescend) [and other forms], from Old English *crenċan, *crenċġan, *crengan (to cause to fall or turn), the causative of crinċġan (to yield; to cringe; to fall; to die, perish), from Proto-Germanic *krangijaną (to cause to fall; to cause to turn), from Proto-Germanic *kringaną, *krinkaną (to fall; to turn; to yield) (from Proto-Indo-European *grenǵʰ- (to turn)) + *-janą (suffix forming causatives with the sense ‘to cause to do (the action of the verb)’ from strong verbs). The English word is cognate with Danish krænge (to turn inside out, evert), Dutch krengen (to careen, veer), Scots crenge, creenge, creinge, crienge (to cringe; to shrug), Swedish kränga (to careen; to heel, lurch; to toss), and West Frisian kringe (to pinch; to poke; to push; to insist, urge); and is a doublet of crinkle.

The noun and adjective are derived from the verb.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /kɹɪnd͡ʒ/
  • Rhymes: -ɪndʒ

Verb

cringe (third-person singular simple present cringes, present participle cringing, simple past and past participle cringed)

  1. (intransitive) To cower, flinch, recoil, shrink, or tense, as in disgust, embarrassment, or fear.
  2. (intransitive, figuratively) To experience an inward feeling of disgust, embarrassment, or fear; (by extension) to feel very embarrassed.
  3. (intransitive) To bow or crouch in servility.
  4. (intransitive, figuratively) To act in an obsequious or servile manner.
  5. (transitive, obsolete) To draw (a body part) close to the body; also, to distort or wrinkle (the face, etc.).
  6. (transitive, obsolete) To bow or crouch to (someone) in servility; to escort (someone) in a cringing manner.

Conjugation

Alternative forms

  • crinch (dialectal)

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • crouch
  • wince

Noun

cringe (countable and uncountable, plural cringes)

  1. (countable) A gesture or posture of cringing (recoiling or shrinking).
  2. (countable, figuratively) An act or disposition of servile obeisance.
  3. (countable, Britain, dialectal) A crick (painful muscular cramp or spasm of some part of the body).
  4. (uncountable, slang) Awkwardness or embarrassment which causes an onlooker to cringe; cringeworthiness.

Translations

Adjective

cringe (comparative more cringe, superlative most cringe)

  1. (slang) Inducing awkwardness or embarrassment; cringemaking, cringeworthy, cringy.
    Antonym: (Internet slang) based

Translations

Notes

References

Anagrams

  • cering, genric, rec’ing

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English cringe.

Noun

cringe m (invariable)

  1. (neologism) cringe

Adjective

cringe (invariable)

  1. (neologism) cringy


English

Etymology

From Middle English wincen, winchen, from Anglo-Norman *wenchir, Old Northern French *wenchier (compare Old French guenchir), from Frankish *wenkjan, from Proto-Germanic *wankjan. See also German winken.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /wɪns/
  • Rhymes: -ɪns

Noun

wince (plural winces)

  1. A sudden movement or gesture of shrinking away.
  2. A reel used in dyeing, steeping, or washing cloth; a winch. It is placed over the division wall between two wince pits so as to allow the cloth to descend into either compartment at will.

Translations

Verb

wince (third-person singular simple present winces, present participle wincing, simple past and past participle winced)

  1. (intransitive) To flinch as if in pain or distress.
  2. (transitive) To wash (cloth), dip it in dye, etc., with the use of a wince.
  3. To kick or flounce when unsteady or impatient.

Translations

See also

  • cringe

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