criticise vs knock what difference

what is difference between criticise and knock

English

Verb

criticise (third-person singular simple present criticises, present participle criticising, simple past and past participle criticised) (transitive, intransitive, Britain)

  1. Alternative spelling of criticize

Anagrams

  • sericitic


English

Etymology

From Middle English knokken, from Old English cnocian, ġecnocian, cnucian (to knock, pound on, beat), from Proto-Germanic *knukōną (to knock), a suffixed form of *knu-, *kneu- (to pound on, beat), from Proto-Indo-European *gen- (to squeeze, pinch, kink, ball up, concentrate). The English word is cognate with Middle High German knochen (to hit), Old English cnuian, cnuwian (to pound, knock), Old Norse knoka (compare Danish knuge, Swedish knocka (to hug)).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /nɒk/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /nɑk/
  • Rhymes: -ɒk

Noun

knock (countable and uncountable, plural knocks)

  1. An abrupt rapping sound, as from an impact of a hard object against wood.
  2. A sharp impact.
  3. (figuratively) Criticism.
    • 2012, Tom Lamont, How Mumford & Sons became the biggest band in the world (in The Daily Telegraph, 15 November 2012)[1]
      Since forming in 2007 Mumford & Sons have hard-toured their way to a vast market for throaty folk that’s strong on banjo and bass drum. They have released two enormous albums. But, wow, do they take some knocks back home.
  4. (automotive) Preignition, a type of abnormal combustion occurring in spark ignition engines caused by self-ignition; also, the characteristic knocking sound associated with it.
  5. (cricket) A batsman’s innings.
  6. (cycling) Synonym of hunger knock

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

knock (third-person singular simple present knocks, present participle knocking, simple past and past participle knocked)

  1. (transitive, dated) To strike for admittance; to rap upon, as a door.
  2. (transitive, colloquial) To criticize verbally; to denigrate; to undervalue.
  3. (transitive, soccer) To kick a ball towards another player; to pass.
  4. (transitive, Britain, slang, dated) To impress forcibly or strongly; to astonish; to move to admiration or applause.
  5. (transitive, intransitive, dated) To bump or impact.
    • 1900, L. Frank Baum, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz Chapter 23
      “The Silver Shoes,” said the Good Witch, “have wonderful powers. And one of the most curious things about them is that they can carry you to any place in the world in three steps, and each step will be made in the wink of an eye. All you have to do is to knock the heels together three times and command the shoes to carry you wherever you wish to go.”
  6. (intransitive) To rap one’s knuckles against something, especially wood.

Conjugation

Derived terms

Translations


Yola

Noun

knock

  1. Alternative form of knaugh

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