cronk vs honk what difference

what is difference between cronk and honk

English

Etymology 1

Imitative. Compare quonk.

Verb

cronk (third-person singular simple present cronks, present participle cronking, simple past and past participle cronked)

  1. To honk like a goose.

Noun

cronk (plural cronks)

  1. The honking sound of a goose.

Etymology 2

Probably from British dialect crank (unwell, ill, weak, weak-minded).

Adjective

cronk (comparative more cronk, superlative most cronk)

  1. (Australia, colloquial, obsolete) Unwell, sick.
  2. (Australia, colloquial, obsolete) Of a horse, broken down, not useful as a work horse due to illness or infirmity.
  3. (Australia, colloquial, obsolete) Illegal; dishonest.
  4. (Australia, colloquial, obsolete) No good; bad.

Etymology 3

Noun

cronk (plural cronks)

  1. (Isle of Man) A hill or barrow.

Manx

Etymology

From Old Irish cnocc, from Proto-Celtic *knokkos (hill).

Noun

cronk m (genitive singular cruink or crink, plural cruink or crink)

  1. hill
  2. mount
  3. tor

Derived terms

  • crongan

Mutation


Middle English

Alternative forms

  • cranke

Etymology

From Old English cranc, from Proto-Germanic *krankaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /krɔnk/

Noun

cronk

  1. (rare) crank (handle for moving a crankshaft).

Descendants

  • English: crank
  • Scots: crank

References

  • “crank, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-07-07.


English

Etymology 1

Onomatopoeic.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /hɒŋk/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /hɑŋk/, /hɔŋk/
  • Rhymes: -ɒŋk

Verb

honk (third-person singular simple present honks, present participle honking, simple past and past participle honked)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To use a car horn.
  2. (intransitive) To make a loud, harsh sound like a car horn.
  3. (intransitive) To make the vocal sound of a goose.
  4. (slang) To vomit: regurgitate the contents of one’s stomach.
  5. (slang) To have a bad smell.
  6. (informal) To squeeze playfully, usually a breast or nose.

Derived terms

  • honker
  • honking
Translations

Noun

honk (countable and uncountable, plural honks)

  1. The sound produced by a typical car horn.
  2. The cry of a goose.
  3. (informal) A bad smell.
Translations

Interjection

honk

  1. Imitation of car horn, used, for example, to clear a path for oneself.
Translations

Etymology 2

Noun

honk (plural honks)

  1. Clipping of honky.

Anagrams

  • Kohn, khon

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch honc, likely through Old Dutch from Proto-Germanic *hank-, *hunk-. Only has cognates in the Frisian languages and possibly in the Old High German placename Hancwin. Since cognates outside of Germanic are lacking, the word is probably of substrate origin. Possibly related to haak (hook) and hoek (corner).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɦɔŋk/
  • Hyphenation: honk
  • Rhymes: -ɔŋk

Noun

honk n (plural honken, diminutive honkje n)

  1. (somewhat rare) home, place where one belongs, shelter
  2. (games) base (safe zone, e.g. in baseball and similar sports)

Synonyms

  • (home): thuis, heem

Derived terms

  • honkbal
  • honkvast
  • jeugdhonk
  • krachthonk

Descendants

  • Papiamentu: honk (dated)

References


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