cruise vs sail what difference

what is difference between cruise and sail

English

Alternative forms

  • cruize

Etymology

Borrowed from Dutch kruisen (cross, sail around), from kruis (cross), from Middle Dutch cruce, from Latin crux.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: kro͞oz, IPA(key): /kɹuːz/
  • Homophone: crews
  • Rhymes: -uːz

Noun

cruise (plural cruises)

  1. A sea or lake voyage, especially one taken for pleasure.
  2. (aeronautics) Portion of aircraft travel at a constant airspeed and altitude between ascent and descent phases.
  3. (US, military, informal) A period spent in the Marine Corps.
    • 1919, United States. Marine Corps, Recruiters’ Bulletin (page 16)
      I ended my cruise of four years in the Marine Corps at the first Officers’ Training Camp for enlisted men at Quantico []
    • 2015, George Barnett, Andy Barnett, George Barnett, Marine Corps Commandant: A Memoir, 1877-1923
      The New Orleans had to have numerous alterations made, and as the Chicago was just about going into commission, I was ordered to that ship to finish my cruise.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

cruise (third-person singular simple present cruises, present participle cruising, simple past and past participle cruised)

  1. (intransitive) To sail about, especially for pleasure.
    • He and Gerald usually challenged the rollers in a sponson canoe when Gerald was there for the weekend; or, when Lansing came down, the two took long swims seaward or cruised about in Gerald’s dory, clad in their swimming-suits; and Selwyn’s youth became renewed in a manner almost ridiculous, [].
  2. (intransitive) To travel at constant speed for maximum operating efficiency.
  3. (transitive) To move about an area leisurely in the hope of discovering something, or looking for custom.
  4. (transitive, intransitive, forestry) To inspect (forest land) for the purpose of estimating the quantity of lumber it will yield.
  5. (transitive, colloquial) To actively seek a romantic partner or casual sexual partner by moving about a particular area; to troll.
  6. (intransitive, child development) To walk while holding on to an object (stage in development of ambulation, typically occurring at 10 months).
  7. (intransitive, sports) To win easily and convincingly.

Derived terms

  • beach cruiser
  • cruiser
  • cruising for a bruising

Descendants

  • Dutch: cruisen, cruise

Translations

Anagrams

  • crusie, curies

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English cruise, from Dutch kruisen.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kruːs/
  • Hyphenation: cruise
  • Rhymes: -uːs

Noun

cruise m (plural cruises, diminutive cruiseje n)

  1. cruise

Derived terms

  • cruiseboot
  • cruisereis
  • cruiseschip

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Dutch kruisen, via English cruise

Noun

cruise n (definite singular cruiset, indefinite plural cruise, definite plural cruisa or cruisene)

  1. a cruise

Derived terms

  • cruiseskip

References

  • “cruise” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Dutch kruisen, via English cruise

Noun

cruise n (definite singular cruiset, indefinite plural cruise, definite plural cruisa)

  1. a cruise

Derived terms

  • cruiseskip

References

  • “cruise” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /seɪl/, [seɪ̯ɫ]
  • Rhymes: -eɪl
  • Homophone: sale

Etymology 1

From Middle English saile, sayle, seil, seyl, from Old English seġl, from Proto-West Germanic *segl, from Proto-Germanic *seglą. Cognate with West Frisian seil, Low German Segel, Dutch zeil, German Segel, Swedish segel.

Noun

sail (countable and uncountable, plural sails)

  1. (nautical) A piece of fabric attached to a boat and arranged such that it causes the wind to drive the boat along. The sail may be attached to the boat via a combination of mast, spars and ropes.
  2. (nautical, uncountable) The concept of a sail or sails, as if a substance.
  3. (uncountable) The power harnessed by a sail or sails, or the use of this power for travel or transport.
  4. A trip in a boat, especially a sailboat.
  5. (dated, plural “sail”) A sailing vessel; a vessel of any kind; a craft.
  6. (nautical) The conning tower of a submarine.
  7. The blade of a windmill.
  8. A tower-like structure found on the dorsal (topside) surface of submarines.
  9. The floating organ of siphonophores, such as the Portuguese man-of-war.
  10. (fishing) A sailfish.
  11. (paleontology) an outward projection of the spine, occurring in certain dinosaurs and synapsids
  12. Anything resembling a sail, such as a wing.
Hyponyms
  • See also Thesaurus:sail
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English sailen, saylen, seilen, seilien, from Old English siġlan (to sail), from Proto-West Germanic *siglijan, from *siglijaną. Cognate with West Frisian sile, Low German seilen, Dutch zeilen, German segeln, Swedish segla, Icelandic sigla.

Verb

sail (third-person singular simple present sails, present participle sailing, simple past and past participle sailed)

  1. To be impelled or driven forward by the action of wind upon sails, as a ship on water; to be impelled on a body of water by steam or other power.
  2. To move through or on the water; to swim, as a fish or a waterfowl.
  3. To ride in a boat, especially a sailboat.
  4. (intransitive) To set sail; to begin a voyage.
  5. To move briskly and gracefully through the air.
    • [flavor text of the card “Spirit of the Winds”] A spirit of the wind that freely sails the skies.
  6. (intransitive) To move briskly but sedately.
  7. (card games, transitive) To deal out (cards) from a distance by impelling them across a surface.
    • 2007, Johnny Hughes, Texas Poker Wisdom (page 22)
      He would sit his hat across the room, and we would sail cards into it.
Derived terms
  • sail close to the wind
Translations

External links

  • Sail on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Sail in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)

Anagrams

  • Alis, Isla, LIAs, LISA, Lias, Lisa, SiAl, ails, lais, lias, sial

Basque

Noun

sail

  1. area

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English sail. Doublet of zeil

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /seːl/
  • Hyphenation: sail
  • Rhymes: -eːl

Noun

sail n (plural sails)

  1. (nautical) The fin or sail of a submarine.
    Synonym: toren

Irish

Alternative forms

  • sal

Etymology

From Old Irish sal, from Proto-Celtic *salā.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /salʲ/

Noun

sail f (genitive singular saile)

  1. dirt, dross, impurity
  2. stain, defilement

Declension

Derived terms

Related terms

Mutation

Further reading

  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “sal”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  • “sal” in Foclóir Gaeḋilge agus Béarla, Irish Texts Society, 1st ed., 1904, by Patrick S. Dinneen, page 589.
  • “sail” in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Entries containing “sail” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

Volapük

Noun

sail (nominative plural sails)

  1. (nautical) sail

Declension

Derived terms

  • sailan
  • sailön

Welsh

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin solea (sole).

Noun

sail f (plural seiliau, not mutable)

  1. base, basis, foundation
    Synonym: sylfaen

Derived terms

  • seiliedig (established; fundamental)

References

R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “sail”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies


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