crumble vs tumble what difference

what is difference between crumble and tumble

English

Alternative forms

  • crimble (dialectal)

Etymology

From earlier crymble, crimble, from Middle English *crymblen, kremelen, from Old English *crymlan (to crumble), from *crymel (a small crumb; crumble), diminutive of Old English cruma (crumb), equivalent to crumb +‎ -le (diminutive suffix). Compare Dutch kruimelen (to crumble), German Low German krömmeln (to crumble), German Krümel, diminutive of German Krume, German krümeln, krümmeln (to crumble). Alteration of vowel due to analogy with crumb.

Pronunciation

  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈkɹʌmbəl/, [ˈkɹʌmbɪ̈l], [ˈkɹʌmbl̩]
  • Rhymes: -ʌmbəl

Verb

crumble (third-person singular simple present crumbles, present participle crumbling, simple past and past participle crumbled)

  1. (intransitive, often figuratively) To fall apart; to disintegrate.
    The empire crumbled when the ruler’s indiscretions came to light.
  2. (transitive) To break into crumbs.
    We crumbled some bread into the water.
  3. (transitive) To mix (ingredients such as flour and butter) in such a way as to form crumbs.
    Using your fingers, crumble the ingredients with the fingertips, lifting in an upward motion, until the mixture is sandy and resembles large breadcrumbs.

Translations

Noun

crumble (countable and uncountable, plural crumbles)

  1. A dessert of British origin containing stewed fruit topped with a crumbly mixture of fat, flour, and sugar.
    Synonyms: crisp, crunch

Translations

Further reading

  • crumble on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • Clumber

French

Etymology

Borrowed from English crumble.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kʁœm.bœl/, /kʁœ̃bl/

Noun

crumble m (plural crumbles)

  1. (France) crumble (dessert)

Spanish

Noun

crumble m (plural crumbles)

  1. crumble


English

Etymology

From Middle English tumblen (to fall over and over again, tumble), frequentative of Middle English tumben (to fall, leap, dance), from Old English tumbian, from Proto-Germanic *tūmōną (to turn, rotate). Cognate with Middle Dutch tumelen (whence Dutch tuimelen); Middle Low German tumelen, tummelen; and German taumeln.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: tŭmʹbəl, IPA(key): /ˈtʌmbl̩/
  • Rhymes: -ʌmbəl
  • Hyphenation: tum‧ble

Noun

tumble (plural tumbles)

  1. A fall, especially end over end.
    I took a tumble down the stairs and broke my tooth.
  2. A disorderly heap.
    • 2008, David Joutras, A Ghost in the World (page 55)
      When at last we stopped in a tumble of bodies on the grass, laughing, and in Dad’s case, out of breath, we were like little kids (I mean 5 or 6! After all I am 12!) at the end of a playground session.
  3. (informal) An act of sexual intercourse.
    • 1940, John Betjeman, Group Life: Letchworth
      Wouldn’t it be jolly now, / To take our Aertex panters off / And have a jolly tumble in / The jolly, jolly sun?

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

tumble (third-person singular simple present tumbles, present participle tumbling, simple past and past participle tumbled)

  1. (intransitive) To fall end over end; to roll over and over.
    • He who tumbles from a tower surely has a greater blow than he who slides from a molehill.
    • 1907, Robert W. Chambers, The Younger Set
      “Heavens!” exclaimed Nina, “the blue-stocking and the fogy!—and yours are pale blue, Eileen!—you’re about as self-conscious as Drina—slumping there with your hair tumbling à la Mérode! Oh, it’s very picturesque, of course, but a straight spine and good grooming is better. []
  2. (intransitive) To perform gymnastics such as somersaults, rolls, and handsprings.
  3. (intransitive) To drop rapidly.
  4. (transitive) To smoothe and polish, e.g., gemstones or pebbles, by means of a rotating tumbler.
  5. (intransitive, informal) To have sexual intercourse.
  6. (intransitive) To move or rush in a headlong or uncontrolled way.
  7. To muss, to make disorderly; to tousle or rumple.
  8. (cryptocurrencies) To obscure the audit trail of funds by means of a tumbler.
  9. (obsolete, Britain, slang) To comprehend; often in tumble to.
    • 1851, Henry Mayhew, London Labour and the London Poor
      Speaking of this language, a costermonger said to me: “The Irish can’t tumble to it anyhow; the Jews can tumble better, but we’re their masters. Some of the young salesmen at Billingsgate understand us, — but only at Billingsgate; []

Synonyms

  • (to have sexual intercourse): bump uglies, have sex, roll around; see also Thesaurus:copulate
  • (to make disorderly): mess up, touse

Derived terms

  • tumble on
  • tumble to

Translations


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