crump vs scrunch what difference

what is difference between crump and scrunch

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɹʌmp/
  • Homophones: Crump, krump
  • Rhymes: -ʌmp

Etymology 1

Onomatopoeic.

Noun

crump (plural crumps)

  1. The sound of a muffled explosion.
    • 2008, Paul Wood, BBC News. Taking cover on Sderot front line
      “Now you can see what life is like for us here,” said Yakov Shoshani, raising his voice to make himself heard over the sound of a loud crump.

Verb

crump (third-person singular simple present crumps, present participle crumping, simple past and past participle crumped)

  1. (intransitive) To produce such a sound.

Etymology 2

This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Verb

crump (third-person singular simple present crumps, present participle crumping, simple past and past participle crumped)

  1. (intransitive, US, medical slang) For one’s health to decline rapidly (but not as rapidly as crash).

Synonyms

  • circle the drain

Etymology 3

See crumb.

Adjective

crump (comparative more crump, superlative most crump)

  1. (Britain, Scotland, dialect) Hard or crusty; dry baked
    a crump loaf

Etymology 4

From Middle English crump, cromp, croume, from Old English crump, crumb (stooping, bent, crooked), from Proto-Germanic *krumpaz, *krumbaz (bent). Compare Dutch krom (bent), German krumm (crooked), Danish krum. Related to cramp.

Adjective

crump (comparative more crump, superlative most crump)

  1. (obsolete) Crooked; bent.


English

Etymology

Attested since about 1800. Probably an intensive form of crunch; ultimately derived from the onomatopoeia of a crumpling sound; or perhaps a blend of squeeze +‎ crunch.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /skɹʌntʃ/
  • Rhymes: -ʌntʃ

Verb

scrunch (third-person singular simple present scrunches, present participle scrunching, simple past and past participle scrunched)

  1. (transitive) To crumple and squeeze to make more compact.
    He scrunched the paper into a ball and threw it at the whistling girl.
    • 1793–1799, Robert Townson, Tracts and Observations in Natural History and Physiology, page 154:
      [] and the scrunching of ashes under our feet I have often observed to be disagreeable to many.
    • 1800, Walter Besant, James Rice, With Harp and Crown, page 828:
      Then I put them under my heel, and scrunched them up, every one.
    1. (with object “one’s face”) To contract the muscles of one’s face so as to draw their facial features together, out of pain, discomfort, uncertainty, etc.
      He scrunched his face at his wife’s request.
  2. Alternative form of scranch

Translations

See also

  • scrunchie
  • scrunch up

Noun

scrunch (plural scrunches)

  1. A crunching noise.

Translations

Further reading

  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “scrunch”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

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