Cuss vs Curse what difference

what is difference between Cuss and Curse

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kʌs/
  • Rhymes: -ʌs

Etymology 1

American English dialect pronunciation of curse.

Verb

cuss (third-person singular simple present cusses, present participle cussing, simple past and past participle cussed)

  1. (chiefly US) To use cursing, to use bad language, to speak profanely.
    • 1899, H. G. Wells, Mr. Brisher’s Treasure
      I went over the fence like a shot, and ran like one o’clock for the trap, cussing and swearing as I went.
Derived terms
  • cuss out
  • mooncusser
Translations

Noun

cuss (plural cusses)

  1. (chiefly US) A curse.
  2. (chiefly US) A curse word.

Etymology 2

Clipping of customer.

Noun

cuss (plural cusses)

  1. (dated, chiefly US) A fellow, person.
    • 1922, A. M. Chisholm, A Thousand a Plate
      Seemingly here was an intruder who was violating custom. Moreover, the partners had come to look upon this exceedingly rich district as their exclusive property. And so their indignation was extreme.
      “The low-down, ornery cuss!” said Dobbs. “The nerve of him, crowdin’ in on us, just as if there wasn’t lots of other places for him to go!”

Anagrams

  • SCSU, SCUs


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /kɜːs/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /kɝs/
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)s

Etymology 1

From Middle English curse, kors, cors, curs, from Old English cors, curs (curse), of unknown origin.

Noun

curse (plural curses)

  1. A supernatural detriment or hindrance; a bane.
  2. A prayer or imprecation that harm may befall someone.
  3. The cause of great harm, evil, or misfortune; that which brings evil or severe affliction; torment.
    • 1602, William Shakespeare, Toilus and Cressida, Act II, sc. 3:
      The common curse of mankind, folly and ignorance …
  4. A vulgar epithet.
  5. (slang, dated, derogatory, usually with “the”) A woman’s menses.
Derived terms
  • curse of Scotland
Descendants
  • Sranan Tongo: kosi
Translations
  • This translation table is meant for translations approximating the derogatory or strongly negative nature of this term in English. For standard translations, see the translation table at menstruation.

Etymology 2

From Middle English cursen, corsen, coursen, from Old English corsian, cursian (to curse), from the noun (see above).

Verb

curse (third-person singular simple present curses, present participle cursing, simple past and past participle cursed or (archaic) curst)

  1. (transitive) To place a curse upon (a person or object).
    • Captain Edward Carlisle [] felt a curious sensation of helplessness seize upon him as he met her steady gaze, [] ; he could not tell what this prisoner might do. He cursed the fate which had assigned such a duty, cursed especially that fate which forced a gallant soldier to meet so superb a woman as this under handicap so hard.
  2. To call upon divine or supernatural power to send injury upon; to imprecate evil upon; to execrate.
    • 1611, Bible (King James Version), Exodus xxii. 28
      Thou shalt not [] curse the ruler of thy people.
  3. (transitive) To speak or shout a vulgar curse or epithet.
  4. (intransitive) To use offensive or morally inappropriate language.
    • 1611, Bible (King James Version), Matthew xxi. 74
      Then began he to curse and to swear.
    Synonym: swear
  5. To bring great evil upon; to be the cause of serious harm or unhappiness to; to furnish with that which will be a cause of deep trouble; to afflict or injure grievously; to harass or torment.
    • 1703, Alexander Pope, Thebais
      On impious realms and barbarous kings impose / Thy plagues, and curse ’em with such sons as those.
Antonyms
  • bless
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Sranan Tongo: kosi
Translations

Anagrams

  • Cruse, Cures, Sucre, crues, cruse, cuers, cures, ecrus, sucre

Latin

Participle

curse

  1. vocative masculine singular of cursus

Portuguese

Verb

curse

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of cursar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of cursar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of cursar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of cursar

Romanian

Noun

curse f pl

  1. plural of cursă

Spanish

Verb

curse

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of cursar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of cursar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of cursar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of cursar.

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