dampen vs stifle what difference

what is difference between dampen and stifle

English

Etymology

From damp +‎ -en.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈdæmpən/

Verb

dampen (third-person singular simple present dampens, present participle dampening, simple past and past participle dampened)

  1. (transitive) To make damp or moist; to make moderately wet.
  2. (intransitive) To become damp or moist.
  3. (transitive) To lessen; to dull; to make less intense (said of emotions and non-physical things).
    • 1883 “Pomona’s Daughter”, Frank R. Stockton, in The Century, vol. XXVI, number 1, May, page 25
      He was dreadfully familiar with everything, and talked about some places we were longing to see in a way that considerably dampened our enthusiasm.
    • 2007 October 16, Jane E. Brody, “Despite Strides, Listeria Needs Vigilance”, The New York Times,
      Pregnant women are 20 times as likely as other healthy young women to contract listeriosis, probably because in pregnancy the immune system is dampened to prevent rejection of the fetus.
  4. (intransitive) To become damped or deadened.

Translations

Anagrams

  • dampne, madnep

Danish

Noun

dampen c

  1. definite singular of damp

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈdɑmpə(n)/
  • Hyphenation: dam‧pen
  • Rhymes: -ɑmpən

Etymology 1

From damp +‎ -en. The meaning “to vape” is a semantic loan from English.

Verb

dampen

  1. (intransitive) to steam, to give off steam or smoke
  2. (intransitive) to vape (to inhale the vapour of an electronic cigarette)
    Synonym: vapen
Inflection
Derived terms
  • bedampen
  • indampen
  • uitdampen
  • verdampen

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun

dampen

  1. Plural form of damp

Middle English

Verb

dampen

  1. Alternative form of dampnen

Norwegian Bokmål

Noun

dampen m

  1. definite singular of damp

Norwegian Nynorsk

Noun

dampen

  1. definite singular of damp


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈstaɪfl̩/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈstaɪf(ə)l/
  • Rhymes: -aɪfəl
  • Hyphenation: stif‧le

Etymology 1

The verb is derived from Late Middle English stuflen (to have difficulty breathing due to heat, stifle; to suffocate by drowning, drown) [and other forms]; further etymology uncertain, perhaps from stuffen (to kill by suffocation; to stifle from heat; to extinguish, suppress (body heat, breath, humour, etc.); to deprive a plant of the conditions necessary for growth, choke) + -el- (derivational infix in verbs, often denoting diminutive, intensive, or repetitive actions or events). Stuffen is derived from Old French estofer, estouffer (to choke, strangle, suffocate; (figuratively) to inhibit, prevent) [and other forms] (modern French étouffer), a variant of estoper, estuper (to block, plug, stop up; to stiffen, thicken) (modern French étouper (to caulk)), influenced by estofer (to pad, stuff; to upholster) (modern French étoffer). Estoper is derived from Vulgar Latin *stuppāre, from Latin stuppa (coarse flax, tow) (as a stuffing material; from Ancient Greek στύπη (stúpē), στύππη (stúppē) (compare στυππεῖον (stuppeîon)); probably from Pre-Greek) + -āre. According to the Oxford English Dictionary a derivation from Old Norse stífla (to dam; to choke, stop up) “appears untenable on the ground both of form and sense”.

The noun is derived from the verb.

Verb

stifle (third-person singular simple present stifles, present participle stifling, simple past and past participle stifled)

  1. (transitive, also figuratively) To make (an animal or person) unconscious or cause (an animal or person) death by preventing breathing; to smother, to suffocate.
    • 1708, Jonathan Swift, Accomplishment of the First Prediction
      I took my leave, being half stifled with the closeness of the room.
  2. (transitive, hyperbolic) To cause (someone) difficulty in breathing, or a choking or gagging feeling.
  3. (transitive, also figuratively) To prevent (a breath, cough, or cry, or the voice, etc.) from being released from the throat.
  4. (transitive) To make (something) unable to be heard by blocking it with some medium.
  5. (transitive, figuratively)
    1. (transitive) To keep in, hold back, or repress (something).
      Synonyms: hinder, restrain, smother, suppress, throttle
      • 1723, Daniel Waterland, A Second Vindication of Christ’s Divinity
        I desire only to have things fairly represented as they really are; no evidence smothered or stifled.
    2. (transitive) To prevent (something) from being revealed; to conceal, to hide, to suppress.
  6. (transitive, agriculture (sericulture)) To treat (a silkworm cocoon) with steam as part of the process of silk production.
  7. (intransitive) To die of suffocation.
  8. (intransitive, hyperbolic) To feel smothered; to find it difficult to breathe.
Conjugation
Alternative forms
  • stifil (obsolete, 16th c.)
Derived terms
Translations
See also
  • Thesaurus:die

Noun

stifle (plural stifles)

  1. (rare) An act or state of being stifled.
Translations

Etymology 2

The noun is derived from Middle English stifle (joint between the femur and tibia of a quadruped) [and other forms]; further etymology uncertain, probably derived from Anglo-Norman estive (leg), and Old French estive (leg) (compare Old French estival (boot, shoe)).

The verb is derived from the noun.

Noun

stifle (plural stifles)

  1. (zootomy) The joint between the femur and tibia in the hind leg of various four-legged mammals, especially horses, corresponding to the knee in humans.
    Synonym: stifle joint
  2. (veterinary medicine) A bone disease of this region.
Derived terms
  • stifle bone
  • stifle joint
Translations

Verb

stifle (third-person singular simple present stifles, present participle stifling, simple past and past participle stifled)

  1. (transitive) To cause (a dog, horse, or other four-legged mammal) to dislocate or sprain its stifle joint.
Derived terms
  • stifling (noun)
Translations

Notes

References

Further reading

  • asphyxia on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • stifle joint on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “stifle”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Anagrams

  • filets, fistle, fliest, flites, itself

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