dampen vs wash what difference

what is difference between dampen and wash

English

Etymology

From damp +‎ -en.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈdæmpən/

Verb

dampen (third-person singular simple present dampens, present participle dampening, simple past and past participle dampened)

  1. (transitive) To make damp or moist; to make moderately wet.
  2. (intransitive) To become damp or moist.
  3. (transitive) To lessen; to dull; to make less intense (said of emotions and non-physical things).
    • 1883 “Pomona’s Daughter”, Frank R. Stockton, in The Century, vol. XXVI, number 1, May, page 25
      He was dreadfully familiar with everything, and talked about some places we were longing to see in a way that considerably dampened our enthusiasm.
    • 2007 October 16, Jane E. Brody, “Despite Strides, Listeria Needs Vigilance”, The New York Times,
      Pregnant women are 20 times as likely as other healthy young women to contract listeriosis, probably because in pregnancy the immune system is dampened to prevent rejection of the fetus.
  4. (intransitive) To become damped or deadened.

Translations

Anagrams

  • dampne, madnep

Danish

Noun

dampen c

  1. definite singular of damp

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈdɑmpə(n)/
  • Hyphenation: dam‧pen
  • Rhymes: -ɑmpən

Etymology 1

From damp +‎ -en. The meaning “to vape” is a semantic loan from English.

Verb

dampen

  1. (intransitive) to steam, to give off steam or smoke
  2. (intransitive) to vape (to inhale the vapour of an electronic cigarette)
    Synonym: vapen
Inflection
Derived terms
  • bedampen
  • indampen
  • uitdampen
  • verdampen

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun

dampen

  1. Plural form of damp

Middle English

Verb

dampen

  1. Alternative form of dampnen

Norwegian Bokmål

Noun

dampen m

  1. definite singular of damp

Norwegian Nynorsk

Noun

dampen

  1. definite singular of damp


English

Etymology

From Middle English washen, waschen, weschen, from Old English wascan, from Proto-Germanic *waskaną, *watskaną (to wash, get wet), from Proto-Indo-European *wed- (wet; water). Cognate with Saterland Frisian waaske (to wash), West Frisian waskje (to wash), Dutch wassen, wasschen (to wash), Low German waschen (to wash), German waschen (to wash), Danish vaske (to wash), Norwegian Bokmål vaske (to wash), Swedish vaska (to wash), Icelandic vaska (to wash).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /wɒʃ/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /wɔʃ/, /wɑʃ/
  • (Canada, NYC, cotcaught merger) IPA(key): /wɑʃ/
  • (US, intrusive r) IPA(key): /wɔɹʃ/
  • Rhymes: -ɒʃ
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)ʃ

Verb

wash (third-person singular simple present washes, present participle washing, simple past and past participle washed)

  1. To clean with water.
    • 1917, Lester Angell Round, Harold Locke Lang, Preservation of vegetables by fermentation and salting, page 9
      Wash the vegetables, drain off the surplus water, and pack them in a keg, crock, or other utensil until it is nearly full
    • 1971, Homemaking Handbook: For Village Workers in Many Countries, page 101
      If using celery or okra, wash the vegetables in safe water.
    • 2010, Catherine Abbott, The Everything Grow Your Own Vegetables Book: Your Complete Guide to planting, tending, and harvesting vegetables, Everything Books →ISBN, page 215
      Wash the vegetables thoroughly; even a little dirt can contain bacteria. Wash vegetables individually under running water.
  2. (transitive) To move or erode by the force of water in motion.
  3. (mining) To separate valuable material (such as gold) from worthless material by the action of flowing water.
  4. (intransitive) To clean oneself with water.
  5. (transitive) To cover with water or any liquid; to wet; to fall on and moisten.
    • [the landscape] washed with a cold, grey mist
  6. (intransitive) To move with a lapping or swashing sound; to lap or splash.
  7. (intransitive) To be eroded or carried away by the action of water.
  8. (intransitive, figuratively) To be cogent, convincing; to withstand critique.
    • 2012, The Economist, Oct 13th 2012 issue, The Jordan and its king: As beleaguered as ever
      The king is running out of ideas as well as cash. His favourite shock-absorbing tactic—to blame his governments and sack his prime ministers—hardly washes.
  9. (intransitive) To bear without injury the operation of being washed.
  10. (intransitive) To be wasted or worn away by the action of water, as by a running or overflowing stream, or by the dashing of the sea; said of road, a beach, etc.
  11. To cover with a thin or watery coat of colour; to tint lightly and thinly.
  12. To overlay with a thin coat of metal.
  13. (transitive) To cause dephosphorization of (molten pig iron) by adding substances containing iron oxide, and sometimes manganese oxide.
  14. (transitive) To pass (a gas or gaseous mixture) through or over a liquid for the purpose of purifying it, especially by removing soluble constituents.

Usage notes

In older works and possibly still in some dialects, wesh and woosh may be found as past tense forms. Washen may be found as a past participle.

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

wash (plural washes)

  1. The process or an instance of washing or being washed by water or other liquid.
  2. A liquid used for washing.
  3. A lotion or other liquid with medicinal or hygienic properties.
  4. The quantity of clothes washed at a time.
  5. (art) A smooth and translucent painting created using a paintbrush holding a large amount of solvent and a small amount of paint.
  6. The sound of breaking of the seas, e.g., on the shore.
    • 1924, Herman Melville, Billy Budd, London: Constable & Co., Chapter 16, [1]
      [] the wind in the cordage and the wash of the sea helped the more to put them beyond earshot []
  7. The bow wave, wake, or vortex of an object moving in a fluid, in particular:
    1. The bow wave or wake of a moving ship, or the vortex from its screws.
      • 2003, Guidelines for Managing Wake Wash from High-speed Vessels: Report of Working Group 41 of the Maritime Navigation Commission, PIANC →ISBN, page 5
        To date, much of the research undertaken on high-speed vessel wake wash has appeared only as unpublished reports for various authorities and management agencies.
    2. The turbulence left in the air by a moving airplane.
    3. The backward current or disturbed water caused by the action of oars, or of a steamer’s screw or paddles, etc.
  8. (nautical) The blade of an oar.
  9. Ground washed away to the sea or a river.
    • The wash of pastures, fields, commons, and roads, [] where rain water hath a long time settled.
  10. A piece of ground washed by the action of water, or sometimes covered and sometimes left dry; the shallowest part of a river, or arm of the sea; also, a bog; a marsh.
  11. A shallow body of water.
  12. In arid and semi-arid regions, the normally dry bed of an intermittent or ephemeral stream; an arroyo or wadi.
    • 1997, Stanley Desmond Smith, et al. Physiological Ecology of North American Desert Plants, Nature
      In some desert-wash systems (which have been termed “xero-riparian”)
    • 1999, Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum, A Natural History of the Sonoran Desert
      though the wash may carry surface water for only a few hours a year.
  13. A situation in which losses and gains or advantages and disadvantages are equivalent; a situation in which there is no net change.
  14. (finance, slang) A fictitious kind of sale of stock or other securities between parties of one interest, or by a broker who is both buyer and seller, and who minds his own interest rather than that of his clients.
  15. Waste liquid, the refuse of food, the collection from washed dishes, etc., from a kitchen, often used as food for pigs; pigwash.
  16. In distilling, the fermented wort before the spirit is extracted.
  17. A mixture of dunder, molasses, water, and scummings, used in the West Indies for distillation.
    • 1793, Bryan Edwards, History, Civil and Commercial, of the British Colonies in the West Indies
      In order to augment the vinosity of the wash, many substances are recommended by Dr. Shaw, such as tartar, nitre, common salt, and the vegetable or mineral acids.
  18. A thin coat of paint or metal laid on anything for beauty or preservation.
  19. Ten strikes, or bushels, of oysters.
  20. (architecture) The upper surface of a member or material when given a slope to shed water; hence, a structure or receptacle shaped so as to receive and carry off water.
  21. (television) A lighting effect that fills a scene with a chosen colour.
  22. (stagecraft) A lighting fixture that can cast a wide beam of light to evenly fill an area with light, as opposed to a spotlight.

Synonyms

  • lavatory

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • WASH (Water, Sanitation and Hygiene)

Anagrams

  • Haws, Shaw, Wahs, haws, shaw, shwa, wahs

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