date vs escort what difference

what is difference between date and escort

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /deɪt/
  • Rhymes: -eɪt

Etymology 1

From Middle English date, from Old French date, datil, datille, from Latin dactylus, from Ancient Greek δάκτυλος (dáktulos, finger) (from the resemblance of the date to a human finger), probably a folk-etymological alteration of a word from a Semitic source such as Arabic دَقَل(daqal, variety of date palm) or Hebrew דֶּקֶל(deqel, date palm).

Noun

date (plural dates)

  1. The fruit of the date palm, Phoenix dactylifera, somewhat in the shape of an olive, containing a soft, sweet pulp and enclosing a hard kernel.
  2. The date palm.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English date, from Old French date, from Late Latin data, from Latin datus (given), past participle of dare (to give); from Proto-Indo-European *deh₃- (to give). Doublet of data.

Noun

date (plural dates)

  1. The addition to a writing, inscription, coin, etc., which specifies the time (especially the day, month, and year) when the writing or inscription was given, executed, or made.
    US date : 05/24/08 = Tuesday, May 24th, 2008. UK date : 24/05/08 = Tuesday 24th May 2008.
    • 1681, John Dryden, The Spanish Friar
      And bonds without a date, they say, are void.
  2. A specific day in time at which a transaction or event takes place, or is appointed to take place; a given point of time.
    The start date for the festival is September 2.
    • 1844, Mark Akenside, The Pleasures of the Imagination, Book II
      He at once, Down the long series of eventful time, So fix’d the dates of being, so disposed To every living soul of every kind The field of motion, and the hour of rest.
  3. A point in time.
  4. (rare) Assigned end; conclusion.
  5. (obsolete) Given or assigned length of life; duration.
    • 1611-15, George Chapman (translator), Homer (author), The Odysseys of Homer, Volume 1, Book IV,[1] lines 282–5,
      As now Saturnius, through his life’s whole date,
      Hath Nestor’s bliss raised to as steep a state,
      Both in his age to keep in peace his house,
      And to have children wise and valorous.
  6. A pre-arranged meeting.
    • 1903, Guy Wetmore Carryl, The Lieutenant-Governor, Houghton, Mifflin and Company, page 121:
      “Why, Mr. Nisbet! I thought you were in New York.”
      “I had a telegram this morning, calling the date off,”
  7. One’s companion for social activities or occasions.
  8. A romantic meeting or outing with a lover or potential lover, or the person so met.
Derived terms
Descendants
  • German: Date
Translations

Verb

date (third-person singular simple present dates, present participle dating, simple past and past participle dated)

  1. (transitive) To note the time or place of writing or executing; to express in an instrument the time of its execution.
  2. (transitive) To note or fix the time of (an event); to give the date of.
  3. (transitive) To determine the age of something.
  4. (transitive) To take (someone) on a date, or a series of dates.
  5. (transitive, by extension) To have a steady relationship with; to be romantically involved with.
    Synonyms: go out, see; see also Thesaurus:date
  6. (reciprocal, by extension) To have a steady relationship with each other; to be romantically involved with each other.
    Synonyms: go out, see; see also Thesaurus:date
  7. (transitive, intransitive) To make or become old, especially in such a way as to fall out of fashion, become less appealing or attractive, etc.
    Synonyms: age, elden, obsolesce; see also Thesaurus:to age
  8. (intransitive, with from) To have beginning; to begin; to be dated or reckoned.
    • 1826, Edward Everett, The Claims of Citizens of the United States of America on the Governments of Naples, Holland, and France
      The Batavian republic dates from the successes of the French arms.
Usage notes
  • To note the time of writing one may say dated at or from a place.
Translations

See also

  • Sabbath
  • calendar

Anagrams

  • AEDT, Daet, EDTA, TAED, tead

Aromanian

Numeral

date

  1. Alternative form of dzatse

Danish

Etymology

From English date.

Noun

date c (singular definite daten, plural indefinite dates)

  1. a date (meeting with a lover or potential lover)
    Synonyms: rendezvous, stævnemøde

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /deɪt/
  • Rhymes: -eɪt

Verb

date (imperative date, infinitive at date, present tense dater, past tense datede, perfect tense har datet)

  1. to date (someone)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /deɪte/
  • Rhymes: -eɪte

References

  • “date” in Den Danske Ordbog
  • “date,2” in Den Danske Ordbog

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English date.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /deːt/
  • Hyphenation: date
  • Rhymes: -eːt

Noun

date m (plural dates)

  1. A date (romantic outing).

Derived terms

  • blind date

Related terms

  • daten

French

Etymology 1

From Old French date, a borrowing from Late Latin data, from the feminine of Latin datus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dat/

Noun

date f (plural dates)

  1. date (point in time)

Derived terms

Further reading

  • “date” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English date.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dɛ.it/

Noun

date m or f (plural dates)

  1. (slang, anglicism) date (romantic meeting)
  2. (slang, anglicism, masculine) date (person you go on a romantic meeting with)

Further reading

  • https://www.btb.termiumplus.gc.ca/tpv2guides/guides/clefsfp/index-fra.html?lang=fra&lettr=indx_catlog_d&page=9iwGrR_cgy6U.html

Interlingua

Participle

date

  1. past participle of dar

Italian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈda.te/

Noun

date f

  1. plural of data

Verb

date

  1. inflection of dare:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative

Participle

date

  1. feminine plural past participle of dare

Anagrams

  • teda

Latin

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈda.te/, [ˈd̪ät̪ɛ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈda.te/, [ˈd̪ɑːt̪ɛ]

Verb

date

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of

Participle

date

  1. vocative masculine singular of datus

Old French

Etymology

Borrowed from Late Latin data, from the feminine of Latin data.

Noun

date f (oblique plural dates, nominative singular date, nominative plural dates)

  1. date (point in time)
  2. date (fruit)

Descendants

  • English: date
  • French: date

Portuguese

Verb

date

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of datar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of datar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of datar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of datar

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈdate/, [ˈd̪a.t̪e]

Verb

date

  1. Compound of the informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of dar, da and the pronoun te.


English

Etymology

Borrowed from French escorte, itself borrowed from Italian scorta.

Pronunciation

  • Noun:
    • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈɛs.kɔɹt/
    • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈɛs.kɔːt/
    • Hyphenation: es‧cort
  • Verb:
    • (General American) IPA(key): /ɪsˈkɔɹt/
    • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɪsˈkɔːt/
    • Hyphenation: es‧cort

Noun

escort (plural escorts)

  1. A group of people or vehicles, generally armed, who go with a person or people of importance to safeguard them on a journey or mission.
    • 1898, Arnold Henry Savage Landor, In the Forbidden Land Chapter LXXXIII
      The soldier who was pulling at the other end was clumsily unhorsed, and I myself was all but thrown by the unexpected jerk. This ludicrous incident at first provoked mirth among my escort, a mirth which their superstitious minds immediately turned into an ill omen.
    • 1883, Ambrose Bierce, George Thurston
      Whole squadrons of cavalry escort had sometimes to be sent thundering against a powerful infantry outpost in order that the brief time between the charge and the inevitable retreat might be utilized in sounding a ford or determining the point of intersection of two roads.
  2. An accompanying person in such a group.
  3. A guard who travels with a dangerous person, such as a criminal, for the protection of others.
  4. A group of people attending as a mark of respect or honor.
  5. An accompanying person in a social gathering, etc.
  6. Protection, care, or safeguard on a journey or excursion.
  7. (somewhat euphemistic) A sex worker who does not operate in a brothel, but with whom clients make appointments; a call girl or male equivalent.

Translations

Derived terms

  • escort agency
  • escort carrier
  • escort service
  • police escort

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ɛˈskɔɹt/, /ɪˈskɔɹt/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɛˈskɔːt/, /ɪˈskɔːt/

Verb

escort (third-person singular simple present escorts, present participle escorting, simple past and past participle escorted)

  1. To attend to in order to guard and protect; to accompany as a safeguard (for the person escorted or for others); to give honorable or ceremonious attendance to
    • 2009, Allen D. Grimshaw, A Social History of Racial Violence
      He reported that the police escorted the children five or six blocks beyond Natural Bridge Avenue and at that point stopped the white children who were following and shooed them back to the park.
  2. To accompany (a person) in order to compel them to go somewhere (e.g. to leave a building).
    • At this point, the Tenant became extremely angry…. the Tenant started yelling even louder and charged at me. The Tenant was restrained by the security guard and escorted out of the hearing room. The Tenant was ultimately escorted out of the Board’s office because he continued his yelling and aggressive behaviour in the hallway and at the customer service desk.
    • 2018, TST-00493-18 (Re), Ontario Landlord and Tenant Board (Anna Solomon, member)
  3. To go with someone as a partner, for example on a formal date.

Synonyms

  • accompany; attend.
  • (go with someone as a partner): squire

Translations

References

  • escort in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • Coster, Ectors, Tresco, corset, coster, recost, rectos, scoter, scrote, sector

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English escort.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛs.kɔrt/
  • Hyphenation: es‧cort

Noun

escort m (plural escorts)

  1. escort (sex worker)

Related terms

  • escorte
  • escorteren

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