date vs see what difference

what is difference between date and see

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /deɪt/
  • Rhymes: -eɪt

Etymology 1

From Middle English date, from Old French date, datil, datille, from Latin dactylus, from Ancient Greek δάκτυλος (dáktulos, finger) (from the resemblance of the date to a human finger), probably a folk-etymological alteration of a word from a Semitic source such as Arabic دَقَل(daqal, variety of date palm) or Hebrew דֶּקֶל(deqel, date palm).

Noun

date (plural dates)

  1. The fruit of the date palm, Phoenix dactylifera, somewhat in the shape of an olive, containing a soft, sweet pulp and enclosing a hard kernel.
  2. The date palm.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English date, from Old French date, from Late Latin data, from Latin datus (given), past participle of dare (to give); from Proto-Indo-European *deh₃- (to give). Doublet of data.

Noun

date (plural dates)

  1. The addition to a writing, inscription, coin, etc., which specifies the time (especially the day, month, and year) when the writing or inscription was given, executed, or made.
    US date : 05/24/08 = Tuesday, May 24th, 2008. UK date : 24/05/08 = Tuesday 24th May 2008.
    • 1681, John Dryden, The Spanish Friar
      And bonds without a date, they say, are void.
  2. A specific day in time at which a transaction or event takes place, or is appointed to take place; a given point of time.
    The start date for the festival is September 2.
    • 1844, Mark Akenside, The Pleasures of the Imagination, Book II
      He at once, Down the long series of eventful time, So fix’d the dates of being, so disposed To every living soul of every kind The field of motion, and the hour of rest.
  3. A point in time.
  4. (rare) Assigned end; conclusion.
  5. (obsolete) Given or assigned length of life; duration.
    • 1611-15, George Chapman (translator), Homer (author), The Odysseys of Homer, Volume 1, Book IV,[1] lines 282–5,
      As now Saturnius, through his life’s whole date,
      Hath Nestor’s bliss raised to as steep a state,
      Both in his age to keep in peace his house,
      And to have children wise and valorous.
  6. A pre-arranged meeting.
    • 1903, Guy Wetmore Carryl, The Lieutenant-Governor, Houghton, Mifflin and Company, page 121:
      “Why, Mr. Nisbet! I thought you were in New York.”
      “I had a telegram this morning, calling the date off,”
  7. One’s companion for social activities or occasions.
  8. A romantic meeting or outing with a lover or potential lover, or the person so met.
Derived terms
Descendants
  • German: Date
Translations

Verb

date (third-person singular simple present dates, present participle dating, simple past and past participle dated)

  1. (transitive) To note the time or place of writing or executing; to express in an instrument the time of its execution.
  2. (transitive) To note or fix the time of (an event); to give the date of.
  3. (transitive) To determine the age of something.
  4. (transitive) To take (someone) on a date, or a series of dates.
  5. (transitive, by extension) To have a steady relationship with; to be romantically involved with.
    Synonyms: go out, see; see also Thesaurus:date
  6. (reciprocal, by extension) To have a steady relationship with each other; to be romantically involved with each other.
    Synonyms: go out, see; see also Thesaurus:date
  7. (transitive, intransitive) To make or become old, especially in such a way as to fall out of fashion, become less appealing or attractive, etc.
    Synonyms: age, elden, obsolesce; see also Thesaurus:to age
  8. (intransitive, with from) To have beginning; to begin; to be dated or reckoned.
    • 1826, Edward Everett, The Claims of Citizens of the United States of America on the Governments of Naples, Holland, and France
      The Batavian republic dates from the successes of the French arms.
Usage notes
  • To note the time of writing one may say dated at or from a place.
Translations

See also

  • Sabbath
  • calendar

Anagrams

  • AEDT, Daet, EDTA, TAED, tead

Aromanian

Numeral

date

  1. Alternative form of dzatse

Danish

Etymology

From English date.

Noun

date c (singular definite daten, plural indefinite dates)

  1. a date (meeting with a lover or potential lover)
    Synonyms: rendezvous, stævnemøde

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /deɪt/
  • Rhymes: -eɪt

Verb

date (imperative date, infinitive at date, present tense dater, past tense datede, perfect tense har datet)

  1. to date (someone)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /deɪte/
  • Rhymes: -eɪte

References

  • “date” in Den Danske Ordbog
  • “date,2” in Den Danske Ordbog

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English date.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /deːt/
  • Hyphenation: date
  • Rhymes: -eːt

Noun

date m (plural dates)

  1. A date (romantic outing).

Derived terms

  • blind date

Related terms

  • daten

French

Etymology 1

From Old French date, a borrowing from Late Latin data, from the feminine of Latin datus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dat/

Noun

date f (plural dates)

  1. date (point in time)

Derived terms

Further reading

  • “date” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English date.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dɛ.it/

Noun

date m or f (plural dates)

  1. (slang, anglicism) date (romantic meeting)
  2. (slang, anglicism, masculine) date (person you go on a romantic meeting with)

Further reading

  • https://www.btb.termiumplus.gc.ca/tpv2guides/guides/clefsfp/index-fra.html?lang=fra&lettr=indx_catlog_d&page=9iwGrR_cgy6U.html

Interlingua

Participle

date

  1. past participle of dar

Italian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈda.te/

Noun

date f

  1. plural of data

Verb

date

  1. inflection of dare:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative

Participle

date

  1. feminine plural past participle of dare

Anagrams

  • teda

Latin

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈda.te/, [ˈd̪ät̪ɛ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈda.te/, [ˈd̪ɑːt̪ɛ]

Verb

date

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of

Participle

date

  1. vocative masculine singular of datus

Old French

Etymology

Borrowed from Late Latin data, from the feminine of Latin data.

Noun

date f (oblique plural dates, nominative singular date, nominative plural dates)

  1. date (point in time)
  2. date (fruit)

Descendants

  • English: date
  • French: date

Portuguese

Verb

date

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of datar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of datar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of datar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of datar

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈdate/, [ˈd̪a.t̪e]

Verb

date

  1. Compound of the informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of dar, da and the pronoun te.


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: , IPA(key): /siː/
  • Rhymes: -iː
  • Homophones: C, cee, sea, Seay

Etymology 1

From Middle English seen, from Old English sēon (to see, look, behold, perceive, observe, discern, understand, know), from Proto-West Germanic *sehwan, from Proto-Germanic *sehwaną (to see), from Proto-Indo-European *sekʷ- (to see, notice).

Verb

see (third-person singular simple present sees, present participle seeing, simple past saw or (dialectal) seen or (dialectal) seent or (dialectal) seed, past participle seen or (dialectal) seent or (dialectal) seed or (dialectal) saw)

  1. (transitive) To perceive or detect someone or something with the eyes, or as if by sight.
    • 2016, VOA Learning English (public domain)
      I want to see this house!

    1. To witness or observe by personal experience.
      Hyponyms: experience, suffer
    2. To watch (a movie) at a cinema, or a show on television etc.
  2. To form a mental picture of.
    1. (figuratively) To understand.
    2. To come to a realization of having been mistaken or misled.
    3. (transitive) To foresee, predict, or prophesy.
    4. (used in the imperative) Used to emphasise a proposition.
  3. (social) To meet, to visit.
    1. To have an interview with; especially, to make a call upon; to visit.
    2. To date frequently.
    3. To visit for a medical appointment.
  4. (transitive; ergative) To be the setting or time of.
  5. (by extension) To ensure that something happens, especially while witnessing it.
  6. (transitive) To wait upon; attend, escort.
  7. (gambling, transitive) To respond to another player’s bet with a bet of equal value.
  8. To determine by trial or experiment; to find out (if or whether).
  9. (used in the imperative) To reference or to study for further details.
  10. To examine something closely, or to utilize something, often as a temporary alternative.
  11. To include as one of something’s experiences.
Inflection
Synonyms
  • (perceive with the eyes): behold, descry, espy, observe, view
  • (understand): follow, get, understand
  • (date frequently): go out; see also Thesaurus:date
Derived terms
Translations

Interjection

see

  1. Introducing an explanation
    Synonyms: look, well, so
Translations

See also

  • look
  • sight
  • watch

Etymology 2

From Middle English se, see, from Old French sie (seat, throne; town, capital; episcopal see), from Latin sedes (seat), referring to the bishop’s throne or chair (compare seat of power) in the cathedral; related to the Latin verb sedere (to sit).

Noun

see (plural sees)

  1. a diocese, archdiocese; a region of a church, generally headed by a bishop, especially an archbishop.
  2. The office of a bishop or archbishop; bishopric or archbishopric
  3. A seat; a site; a place where sovereign power is exercised.
Related terms
Derived terms
  • Holy See
Translations

See also

  • cathedra
  • cathedral
  • chair
  • throne

Further reading

  • see on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • -ese, ESE, Ese, ees, ese

Afrikaans

Alternative forms

  • (obsolete)

Etymology

From Dutch zee, from Middle Dutch sêe, from Old Dutch sēo, from Proto-Germanic *saiwiz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɪə/

Noun

see (plural seë)

  1. sea

Derived terms

  • seekoei
  • seesout
  • seevis
  • seevoël
  • seewater

Estonian

Etymology

From Proto-Finnic *se, ultimately from Proto-Uralic *śe. cognate to Finnish se, Votic se, Erzya се (se, this, that), Khanty си (si, that over yonder; now, then), and Nganasan [script needed] (sete, he, she).

Pronoun

see (genitive selle, partitive seda)

  1. this
  2. it
  3. (colloquial, somewhat rude) he, she (usually only used when said person is not present)

Declension

See also


Finnish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈseː/, [ˈs̠e̞ː]
  • Rhymes: -eː
  • Syllabification: see

Etymology 1

Compare Swedish ce, English cee, both ultimately from Latin with the c sound changed from a /k/ to a /s/ as is a common change in languages using the Latin alphabet.

Alternative forms

  • cee

Noun

see

  1. cee (The name of the Latin-script letter C.)
Usage notes
  • Speakers often use the corresponding forms of c-kirjain (“letter C, letter c”) instead of inflecting this word, especially in plural. The plural forms may get confused with sei (saithe).
Declension
Synonyms
  • c-kirjain

Etymology 2

< seitsemän

Numeral

see

  1. (colloquial, counting) seven

See also

  • seitsemän (seven)

Etymology 3

From Proto-Finnic *se. Compare Estonian see.

Pronoun

see

  1. (dialectal, rare, Southwest) Synonym of se.

Anagrams

  • ees

Friulian

Alternative forms

  • siee

Etymology

From the verb seâ. Compare Italian sega, Venetian siega, French scie.

Noun

see f (plural seis)

  1. saw

Middle Dutch

Etymology

From Old Dutch sēo, from Proto-Germanic *saiwiz.

Noun

sêe f or m

  1. sea

Inflection

Descendants

  • Dutch: zee f
    • Afrikaans: see
    • Berbice Creole Dutch: sei
    • Javindo: see
    • Negerhollands: see
    • Saramaccan:
    • Sranan Tongo: se
  • Limburgish: zieë f
  • West Flemish: zji m or f, zêe

Further reading

  • “see”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “see (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN, page I

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English .

Alternative forms

  • se, , ce, sea, sei, ze

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɛː/, /seː/
  • Rhymes: -ɛː

Noun

see (plural sees)

  1. sea, ocean
  2. A body of water, a lake
Related terms
  • Rede See
Descendants
  • English: sea
  • Scots: se, see, sey, seye, sie
  • Yola: zea, zee
References
  • “sē, n.(1).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-04-09.

Etymology 2

From Old French sei, from Latin sedes.

Alternative forms

  • se, ce, cee

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /seː/
  • Rhymes: -eː

Noun

see (plural sees)

  1. seat, chair
  2. dwelling, residence
  3. A royal or episcopal chair
  4. A royal or episcopal polity or realm
  5. A royal or episcopal residence
  6. (Christianity) The Kingdom of Heaven.
Descendants
  • English: see
References
  • “sē, n.(2).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-04-09.

North Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian , from Proto-West Germanic *saiwi. Cognates include Dutch zee.

Noun

see m (plural seen)

  1. (Föhr-Amrum) lake

Scots

Alternative forms

  • sie, sey, sei

Etymology

From Middle English seen, from Old English sēon, from Proto-West Germanic *sehwan. Cognate with English see.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈsi]
  • (Coast Scots) IPA(key): [ˈsəi̯]

Verb

see (third-person singular present sees, present participle seein, past saw, seed, past participle seen)

  1. to see

References


Tetum

Verb

see

  1. to turn, to present

West Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian , from Proto-West Germanic *saiwi.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /seː/

Noun

see c (plural seeën, diminutive seeke)

  1. sea

Derived terms

  • seehûn
  • seeko
  • seerôver

Further reading

  • “see”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

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