dawdle vs linger what difference

what is difference between dawdle and linger

English

Etymology

First attested around 1656; perhaps a variant of daddle (to walk unsteadily), influenced by daw (a type of bird, hence a “simpleton, fool”). Not in general use until around 1775.

Alternatively, perhaps borrowed from Middle Low German dȫdelen (to dawdle), related to Saterland Frisian döädelje (to dawdle). Compare also German daddeln (to play), German verdaddeln (to waste (time), neglect, ruin).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈdɔːdəl/
  • Rhymes: -ɔːdəl
  • Homophone: doddle (in accents with the cot-caught merger)

Verb

dawdle (third-person singular simple present dawdles, present participle dawdling, simple past and past participle dawdled)

  1. (intransitive) To spend time idly and unfruitfully; to waste time.
  2. (transitive) To spend (time) without haste or purpose.
  3. (intransitive) To move or walk lackadaisically.

Translations

See also

  • dally, dander, dandle, diddle, loaf, piddle, wander, doodle

Noun

dawdle (plural dawdles)

  1. A dawdler.
    • 1766, George Colman the Elder and David Garrick, The Clandestine Marriage, Act I, page 13
      Where is this dawdle of a housekeeper?
  2. A slow walk, journey.
  3. An easily accomplished task; a doddle.

Anagrams

  • Dewald, Waddle, dwaled, waddle, walded


English

Etymology

From Middle English lenger, lengeren, frequentative of lengen (to tarry), from Old Norse lengja (to lengthen), from Proto-Germanic *langijaną (compare Dutch lengen, German längen), related to the root of long.

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈlɪŋɡɚ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈlɪŋɡə/
  • Rhymes: -ɪŋɡə(ɹ)
  • Hyphenation: lin‧ger

Verb

linger (third-person singular simple present lingers, present participle lingering, simple past and past participle lingered)

  1. (intransitive) To stay or remain in a place or situation, especially as if unwilling to depart or not easily able to do so.
    Synonyms: abide, loiter, tarry; see also Thesaurus:tarry
  2. (intransitive) To remain alive or existent although still proceeding toward death or extinction; to die gradually.
  3. (intransitive, often followed by on) To consider or contemplate for a period of time; to engage in analytic thinking or discussion.

Derived terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • Ringel, Ringle

French

Etymology

linge +‎ -ier (with elision of -i- after palatal)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lɛ̃.ʒe/

Noun

linger m (plural lingers, feminine lingère)

  1. linenkeeper

Further reading

  • “linger” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • ligner

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