daylight vs daytime what difference

what is difference between daylight and daytime

English

Alternative forms

  • day-light

Etymology

From Middle English daye-lighte, dey liȝht, dailiȝt, day-liht, dai-liht (also as days lyȝt, daies liht), equivalent to day +‎ light. Cognate with Saterland Frisian Deegeslucht, Daisljoacht (daylight), West Frisian deiljocht (daylight), Dutch daglicht (daylight), German Tageslicht (daylight).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈdeɪlaɪt/
  • Rhymes: -aɪt

Noun

daylight (countable and uncountable, plural daylights)

  1. The light from the Sun, as opposed to that from any other source.
  2. A light source that simulates daylight.
  3. (countable, photometry) The intensity distribution of light over the visible spectrum generated by the Sun under various conditions or by other light sources intended to simulate natural daylight.
  4. The period of time between sunrise and sunset.
  5. Daybreak.
    • 1835, Sir John Ross, Sir James Clark Ross, Narrative of a Second Voyage in Search of a North-west Passage …, Volume 1, pp.284-5
      Towards the following morning, the thermometer fell to 5°; and at daylight, there was not an atom of water to be seen in any direction.
  6. Exposure to public scrutiny.
  7. A clear, open space.
  8. (countable, machinery) The space between platens on a press or similar machinery.
  9. (idiomatic) Emotional or psychological distance between people, or disagreement.
  10. The gap between the top of a drinking-glass and the level of drink it is filled with.
    Coordinate term: heeltap

Synonyms

  • (light from the Sun): sunlight, sunshine
  • (period between sunrise and sunset): daytime; see also Thesaurus:daytime
  • (daybreak): dayspring, sunrise; see also Thesaurus:dawn

Antonyms

  • night
  • darkness

Derived terms

  • broad daylight, in broad daylight
  • daylight robbery
  • see daylight

Translations

References

  • (gap between glass and drink): 1873, John Camden Hotten, The Slang Dictionary

Verb

daylight (third-person singular simple present daylights, present participle daylighting, simple past and past participle daylighted or daylit)

  1. To expose to daylight
    • 1895, H. G. Wells, The Time Machine, Chapter 7, [1]
      [] the Morlocks, subterranean for innumerable generations, had come at last to find the daylit surface intolerable.
    • 1953, C. S. Lewis, The Silver Chair, Collins, 1998, Chapter 15,
      [] she was not looking at the daylit, sunny world which she so wanted to see.
  2. (architecture) To provide sources of natural illumination such as skylights or windows.
  3. To allow light in, as by opening drapes.
  4. (landscaping, civil engineering) To run a drainage pipe to an opening from which its contents can drain away naturally.
  5. (intransitive) To gain exposure to the open.
    The seam of coal daylighted at a cliff by the river.

Translations

See also

  • dawn
  • sunrise
  • sunset

Anagrams

  • light day


English

Alternative forms

  • day-time

Etymology

day +‎ time

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈdeɪtaɪm/

Noun

daytime (usually uncountable, plural daytimes)

  1. The time of daylight; the time between sunrise and sunset.

Synonyms

  • day, upsun; see also Thesaurus:daytime

Antonyms

  • night, nighttime; see also Thesaurus:nighttime

Derived terms

  • daytimes

Translations

Adjective

daytime (not comparable)

  1. Pertaining to daytime; appropriate to the day.
  2. Happening during the day.
    daytime television

Synonyms

  • (pertaining to daytime): day
  • (happening during the day): day

Antonyms

  • (pertaining to daytime): evening, night, nighttime
  • (happening during the day): evening, night, nighttime

Translations

Anagrams

  • Maytide

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