dean vs doyen what difference

what is difference between dean and doyen

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /diːn/
  • IPA(key): [dĩːn], enPR: dēn (Can we verify(+) this pronunciation?)
  • Rhymes: -iːn
  • Homophone: dene

Etymology 1

From Middle English den, deen (dean), from Anglo-Norman deen and continental Old French deien (modern French doyen), from Latin decānus. Doublet of doyen.

Noun

dean (plural deans)

  1. A senior official in a college or university, who may be in charge of a division or faculty (for example, the dean of science) or have some other advisory or disciplinary function (for example, the dean of students).
  2. A dignitary or presiding officer in certain church bodies, especially an ecclesiastical dignitary, subordinate to a bishop, in charge of a chapter of canons.
  3. The senior member of some group of people.
    dean of the diplomatic corps – a country’s most senior ambassador
    dean of the House – the longest-serving member of a legislature
    • 1955, Rex Stout, “The Next Witness”, in Three Witnesses, October 1994 Bantam edition, →ISBN, page 67:
      All of the switchboard operators had been parties to it, including Marie Willis. Their dean, Alice Hart, collected []
Synonyms
  • (Head of cathedral chapter): provost
Derived terms
  • dean and chapter
  • deanery
  • deaness
Related terms
  • decanal
  • doyen
Translations

Verb

dean (third-person singular simple present deans, present participle deaning, simple past and past participle deaned)

  1. (intransitive, rare) To serve as a dean.
  2. (transitive, rare, informal) To send (a student) to see the dean of a university.

Etymology 2

Related to den.

Noun

dean (plural deans)

  1. (Sussex, chiefly in place names) A hill.

Anagrams

  • Aden, Dane, Dena, Edna, Enda, Nead, aden-, ande, eDNA, nade

Basque

Noun

dean

  1. inessive singular of de

Friulian

Etymology

From Late Latin decānus, from Latin decem (ten). Compare Italian decano, Venetian degàn, French doyen.

Noun

dean m (plural deans)

  1. (religion) dean
  2. doyen

Related terms

  • dîs

Galician

Verb

dean

  1. third-person plural present subjunctive of dar


English

Etymology

Borrowed from French doyen, from Late Latin decānus, from Latin decem. Compare the doublet dean.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈdɔɪ.ən/, /dɔɪˈɛn/
  • (to approximate the French pronunciation) IPA(key): /dwɑˈjæ̃/
  • Rhymes: -ɔɪən, -ɛn

Noun

doyen (plural doyens)

  1. (obsolete) A commander in charge of ten men.
  2. The senior, or eldest male member of a group.
    • 1997, Thomas Swan, The Cezanne Chase, page 171,
      At every turn, Collyers’s aggressive new management in London was out-maneuvering and out promoting the double doyens of the rarefied art auction world. Old-timers at Collyers referred to Christie’s and Sotheby’s as “the Cow and the Sow,” lumping them together in frequent attitudes of disdain, in an attempt to make up for decades of being the brunt of bad jokes.
    • 2000, Steve Fuller, Thomas Kuhn: A Philosophical History for Our Times, page 383,
      Conant’s sense of science’s world-historic mission did not especially endear him to Harvard’s doyens, most of whom still operated with a liberal arts college model of the university in which the humanities reigned supreme and even the natural sciences were treated more as teaching than research subjects.
    • 2007, Vanina Bouté, Political Hierarchical Processes among Some Highlanders of Laos, François Robinne, Mandy Sadan (editors), Social Dynamics in the Highlands of Southeast Asia, page 189,
      On the domain level, two doyens, called “Lords of the Land” were entitled to some further specific prerogatives, including the right to lead rituals on behalf of all the villages of the domain (i.e. the domain of the clan of the doyen and, therefore, the clan considered the founder of the oldest village).
  3. (colloquial) A leading light, or exemplar of a particular practice or movement.
    • 1991, Arif Dirlik, Anarchism in the Chinese Revolution, page 129,
      Unlike the latter, however, Shifu’s seriousness allowed no compromise; his criticism of Zhang ji even brought him into conflict with Wu Zhihui, one of the doyens of anarchism in China.
    • 2008 July 3, Amanda Schaffer, “The Sex Difference Evangelists”, part 3: “Mars, Venus, Babies, and Hormones”, in Slate,
      In an interview, even Simon Baron-Cohen, another doyen of sex-difference claims, offered up some caution.
    • 2011, Maitrii Aung-Thwin, The Return of the Galon King: History, Law, and Rebellion in Colonial Burma, page 199,
      For these doyens of the field, the Burmese conceptual landscape was a sophisticated and complex array of beliefs, exhibiting the ability of communities to adapt, appropriate, and reshape external influences throughout history.

Related terms

  • doyenne

Translations

Anagrams

  • Doney, Doyne, doney, noyed

French

Etymology

From Old French deien, from Late Latin decānus, from Latin decem.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dwa.jɛ̃/

Noun

doyen m (plural doyens, feminine doyenne)

  1. (religion, university) dean
  2. senior member, doyen

Related terms

  • décanat
  • décanal
  • dix

Further reading

  • “doyen” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Middle Dutch

Etymology 1

From Old Dutch *thōien, from Proto-West Germanic *þauwjan, from Proto-Germanic *þawjaną.

Verb

dôyen

  1. to thaw, to melt
Inflection

This verb needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants
  • Dutch: dooien

Etymology 2

Verb

dôyen

  1. Alternative form of douwen
Inflection

This verb needs an inflection-table template.

Further reading

  • “doyen”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “doyen (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN, page I
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “doyen (II)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN, page II

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