dearest vs love what difference

what is difference between dearest and love

English

Etymology

dear +‎ -est, superlative-forming suffix.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈdɪəɹɪst/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈdɪɹɪst/
  • Hyphenation: dear‧est

Adjective

dearest

  1. superlative form of dear: most dear

Translations

Noun

dearest (plural dearests)

  1. A beloved person; a term of endearment.

Synonyms

  • beloved
  • honey
  • darling
  • sweetheart

Translations

Anagrams

  • Tasered, atredes, derates, e-trades, estrade, readest, readset, reasted, red teas, redates, sad tree, sed rate, sedater, steared, tasered


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /lʌv/, [ɫʌv]
  • (Northern England, Ireland) IPA(key): /lʊv/
  • Rhymes: -ʌv

Etymology 1

From Middle English love, luve, from Old English lufu, from Proto-Germanic *lubō, from Proto-Indo-European *lewbʰ- (love, care, desire).

The closing-of-a-letter sense is presumably a truncation of With love or the like.

The verb is from Middle English loven, lovien, from Old English lufian (to love), from the noun lufu (love), see above.

Eclipsed non-native English amour (love), borrowed from French amour (love).

Noun

love (countable and uncountable, plural loves)

  1. (uncountable) Strong affection.
    1. A profound and caring affection towards someone.
      • 1674, John Milton, Paradise Lost:
        He on his side / Leaning half-raised, with looks of cordial love / Hung over her enamoured.
      • 2014, S. Hidden, Jewish, Christian, and Islamic Mystical Perspectives on the Love of God (→ISBN)
    2. Affectionate, benevolent concern or care for other people or beings, and for their well-being.
      • 1864, Utilitarianism Explained and Exemplified in Moral and Political Government:
        The love of your neighbor as yourself, is expressly given as the definition and test of Charity,—not alms-giving—and this love is […] the highest of all the Divine commands[.]
    3. A feeling of intense attraction towards someone.
    4. A deep or abiding liking for something; an enthusiasm for something.
      • 2012, Philip Auerswald, The Coming Prosperity (→ISBN):
        For three decades, the average number of miles driven by US motorists increased steadily. Then, in 2007, that steady climb was suddenly halted. […] What magic caused Americans to temper their longstanding love of the open road?
  2. (countable) A person who is the object of romantic feelings; a darling, a sweetheart, a beloved.
    • 1595, Edmund Spenser, Epithalamion
      Open the temple gates unto my love.
    • 1596-97, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act III Scene 2
      O love, dispatch all business, and be gone!
  3. (colloquial, Commonwealth of Nations) A term of friendly address, regardless of feelings.
  4. A thing, activity, etc which is the object of one’s deep liking or enthusiasm.
    • 1997 March, “Faces of Today’s Black Woman”, in Ebony, volume 52, number 5, page 96:
      But it wasn’t until [Theresa M. Claiborne] went to ROTC training camp at the University of California at Berkeley that she discovered that flying was her first love. “Pilots talk about getting bit by the flying bug,” she says. “I thought, This is heaven.”
  5. (euphemistic) Sexual desire; attachment based on sexual attraction.
    • 2013, Ronald Long, Men, Homosexuality, and the Gods, Routledge (→ISBN), page 3:
      The prospect that their cherished Greeks would have countenanced, much less honored, a love between men that expressed itself carnally, however, was not so easily assimilated.
  6. (euphemistic) Sexual activity.
    • 1986, Ben Elton & al., Blackadder II, “Bells”:
      —What think you, my lord, of… love?
      —You mean ‘rumpy-pumpy’.
  7. An instance or episode of being in love; a love affair.
    • 2014, E. L. Todd, Then Came Absolution (→ISBN):
      Maybe it was just a summer love, something with no future.
  8. Used as the closing, before the signature, of a letter, especially between good friends or family members, or by the young.
  9. Alternative letter-case form of Love (personification of love).
    • c. 1810,, Samuel Johnson (in The Works of Samuel Johnson):
      At busy hearts in vain love’s arrows fly; […]
  10. (obsolete) A thin silk material.
    • 1664, Robert Boyle, Experiments and Considerations Touching Colours, []
      Such a kind of transparency, as that of a Sive, a piece of Cyprus, or a Love-Hood.
  11. A climbing plant, Clematis vitalba.
Synonyms
  • (darling, sweetheart): baby, darling, lover, pet, sweetheart, honey, love bird; see also Thesaurus:sweetheart
  • (term of address): mate, lover, darling, sweetie, sweetheart; see also Thesaurus:lover
  • (sexual desire): aphrodisia, carnality; see also Thesaurus:lust
  • (sexual activity): coitus, sex, the beast with two backs; see also Thesaurus:copulation
  • (instance of being in love): romance
Antonyms
  • (strong affection): hate, hatred, angst; malice, spite
  • (absence of love): indifference
Translations

See love/translations § Noun.

Verb

love (third-person singular simple present loves, present participle loving, simple past and past participle loved)

  1. (usually transitive, sometimes intransitive, stative) To have a strong affection for (someone or something).
    • 1918, Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Land That Time Forgot Chapter VI
      I wanted to take her in my arms and tell her how I loved her, and had taken her hand from the rail and started to draw her toward me when Olson came blundering up on deck with his bedding.
    • 2013 February 26, Pink and Nate Ruess, Just Give Me a Reason:
      Just give me a reason, / just a little bit’s enough, / just a second we’re not broken, just bent / and we can learn to love again.
  2. (transitive) To need, thrive on.
  3. (transitive) To be strongly inclined towards something; an emphatic form of like.
  4. (usually transitive, sometimes intransitive) To care deeply about, to be dedicated to (someone or something).
    • John 3:16
      For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life.
    • Matthew: 22:37-38
      You shall love the Lord your God with your whole heart, and your whole mind, and your whole soul; you shall love your neighbor as yourself.
  5. (transitive) To derive delight from a fact or situation.
  6. (transitive, euphemistic) To have sex with (perhaps from make love).
Conjugation
Synonyms
  • (have a strong affection for): adore, cherish; see also Thesaurus:love
  • (have sexual intercourse with): enjoy, go to bed with, sleep with; see also Thesaurus:copulate with
Antonyms
  • hate, despise
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

See love/translations § Verb.

See also

  • charity

Etymology 2

From Middle English loven, lovien, from Old English lofian (to praise, exalt, appraise, value), from Proto-Germanic *lubōną (to praise, vow), from *lubą (praise), from Proto-Indo-European *lewbʰ- (to like, love, desire), *lewbʰ-.

Verb

love (third-person singular simple present loves, present participle loving, simple past and past participle loved)

  1. (transitive, obsolete or Britain dialectal) To praise; commend.
  2. (transitive, obsolete or Britain dialectal) To praise as of value; prize; set a price on.

Etymology 3

Said by some to be from the idea that when one does a thing “for love”, that is for no monetary gain, the word “love” implies “nothing”. The previously held belief that it originated from the French term l’œuf (the egg), due to its shape, is no longer widely accepted, though compare the use of duck (reputed to be short for duck’s egg) for a zero score at cricket.

Noun

love (uncountable)

  1. (racquet sports, billiards) Zero, no score.
    So that’s fifteen-love to Kournikova.
    • 2013, Paul McNamee, Game Changer: My Tennis Life
      The next day Agassi came back from two sets to love down to beat Courier in five sets.
  2. Nothing; no recompense.
    • 1916, H. Rider Haggard, The Ivory Child
      I fought the white man for less than sixpence. I fought him for love, which is nothing at all.
Translations

References

  • love at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • love in Keywords for Today: A 21st Century Vocabulary, edited by The Keywords Project, Colin MacCabe, Holly Yanacek, 2018.
  • love in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • levo, levo-, velo-, vole, voël

Czech

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈlɔvɛ/

Etymology

Borrowed from Romani love.

Noun

love f pl

  1. (slang) money

Declension

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Synonyms

  • See also prachy

Noun

love m

  1. vocative singular of lov

Further reading

  • love in Kartotéka Novočeského lexikálního archivu

Danish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈlɔːvə/, [ˈlɔːʋə], [ˈlɔːʊ]

Etymology 1

From Middle Low German lōve, from Proto-Germanic *galaubô, cognate with German Glaube.

Noun

love c

  1. (obsolete) trust, faith
    only in the phrase på tro og love (solemnly)

References

  • “love,1” in Den Danske Ordbog

Etymology 2

From Old Norse lofa, from Proto-Germanic *(ga)lubōną, cognate with Swedish lova (to promise; to praise), German loben (to praise), geloben (to vow), Dutch loven (to praise).

Verb

love (past tense lovede, past participle lovet)

  1. to promise
  2. (solemn) to praise

Inflection

References

  • “love,2” in Den Danske Ordbog
  • “love,3” in Den Danske Ordbog

Etymology 3

See See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun

love c

  1. indefinite plural of lov

Dutch

Pronunciation

Verb

love

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of loven

Anagrams

  • velo, voel

French

Verb

love

  1. inflection of lover:
    1. first-person /third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Anagrams

  • vélo, vole, volé

Friulian

Etymology

From Latin lupa, feminine of lupus. Compare Venetian lova, French louve.

Pronunciation

Noun

love f (plural lovis)

  1. she-wolf

Related terms

  • lôf

Hunsrik

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈloːvə/

Verb

love

  1. to praise

Further reading

  • Online Hunsrik Dictionary

Inari Sami

Numeral

love

  1. ten

Middle Dutch

Noun

lōve

  1. dative singular of lof

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • luve, lufæ, lufe

Etymology

From Old English lufu

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈluv(ə)/

Noun

love (plural loves)

  1. love

Descendants

  • English: love
  • Scots: luve, lufe

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse lofa.

Verb

love (imperative lov, present tense lover, simple past and past participle lova or lovet, present participle lovende)

  1. to praise

Verb

love (imperative lov, present tense lover, simple past lova or lovet or lovte or lovde, past participle lova or lovet or lovt or lovd, present participle lovende)

  1. to promise
    (as an adjective) det lovede land – the Promised Land

Related terms

  • løfte

References

  • “love” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Verb

love (present tense lovar or lover, past tense lova or lovde, past participle lova or lovt or lovd, present participle lovande, imperative lov)

  1. Alternative form of lova

Noun

love m (definite singular loven, indefinite plural lovar, definite plural lovane)

  1. Alternative form of lóve

Anagrams

  • vole

Romani

Noun

love

  1. plural of lovo
  2. money

Descendants

  • French: lové
  • Hungarian: lóvé
  • Romanian: lovea
  • Russian: лавэ́ (lavɛ́)
  • Scots: lowie
  • Serbo-Croatian:
    • Cyrillic: ло́ва
    • Latin: lóva
  • Slovak: lóve

Serbo-Croatian

Noun

love (Cyrillic spelling лове)

  1. vocative singular of lov

Verb

love (Cyrillic spelling лове)

  1. third-person plural present of loviti

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