debacle vs fiasco what difference

what is difference between debacle and fiasco

English

Alternative forms

  • débâcle
  • debâcle (rare)
  • débacle (rare)

Etymology

From French débâcle, from débâcler (to unbar; unleash) from prefix dé- (un-) + bâcler (to dash, bind, bar, block) [perhaps from unattested Middle French and Old French *bâcler, *bacler (to hold in place, prop a door or window open)], from Vulgar Latin *bacculare, from Latin baculum (rod, staff used for support), from Proto-Indo-European *bak-.

Also attested in Old French desbacler (to clear a harbour by getting ships unloaded to make room for incoming ships with lading) and in Occitan baclar (to close).

The hypothesis of a derivation from Middle Dutch bakkelen (to freeze artificially, lock in place), from bakken (to stick, stick hard, glue together) has been discredited by the lack of attestation of bakkelen in Middle Dutch and by it having only the meaning “freeze superficially” in Dutch.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /deɪˈbɑː.kəl/, /dɛˈbɑː.kəl/
  • (US) IPA(key): /dɪˈbɑ.kəl/, /dəˈbɑ.kəl/, /deɪˈbɑ.kəl/
  • ,
  • Rhymes: -ɑːkəl
  • Hyphenation: de‧ba‧cle

Noun

debacle (plural debacles)

  1. An event or enterprise that ends suddenly and disastrously, often with humiliating consequences. [from early 19th c.]
    • 1952, Maimonides, translated by Boaz Cohen, Epistle to Yemen page 5,
      The event proved to be a great debacle for the partisans of this prognosticator.
    • 1996, Richard L. Canby, “SOF: An Alternative Perspective on Doctrine”, in Schultz et al (eds), Roles And Missions of SOF In The Aftermath Of The Cold War, p. 188,
      The result is a military approach which maximizes political tensions with Russia [] and lays the ground for a military debacle.
    • 2007, BP pipeline failure: hearing before the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, “Statement by Peter Van Tuyn”, p. 46,
      The BP Prudhoe Bay debacle [the Prudhoe Bay oil spill] thus provides but the latest in a long line of reasons why leasing this region of the NPR-A is a bad idea.
  2. (ecology) A breaking up of a natural dam, usually made of ice, by a river and the ensuing rush of water.
    • 1836, Henry De La Beche, How to Observe: Geology, p. 69
      [] so that in extreme cases the latter may even be dammed up for a time, and a debacle be the consequence, when the main river overcomes the resistance opposed to it, []
    • 1837, John Lee Comstock, Outlines of Geology, p. 51
      For several months after the debacle just described, the river Dranse, having no settled channel, shifted its position continually []
    • 1872, Annual Report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution, p. 425,
      When this débâcle commences [] , the masses of ice, drifting with the current and unable to pass, are hurled upon those already soldered together; thus an enormous barrier is formed []

Usage notes

  • The older spelling with accents is no longer listed at all or only mentioned as an alternative in the online versions of most major British and American dictionaries.

Synonyms

  • (An event or enterprise that ends suddenly and disastrously): fiasco

Translations

References

  • 2005, Ed. Catherine Soanes and Angus Stevenson, The Oxford Dictionary of English (2nd edition revised), Oxford University Press, →ISBN
  • 1998, The Dorling Kindersley Illustrated Oxford Dictionary, Dorling Kindersley Limited and Oxford University Press, →ISBN, page 211
  • 2006, Ed. Michael Allaby, A Dictionary of Ecology, Oxford University Press, →ISBN
  • 1999, Ed. Robert Allen, Pocket Fowler’s Modern English Usage, Oxford University Press, →ISBN
  • 1999, Ed. Jennifer Speake, The Oxford Essential Dictionary of Foreign Terms in English, Oxford University Press, →ISBN

Anagrams

  • belaced

Dutch

Alternative forms

  • (before 1996) debâcle

Etymology

Borrowing of French débâcle.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /deːˈbaː.kəl/, /dəˈbaː.kəl/
  • Hyphenation: de‧ba‧cle
  • Rhymes: -aːkəl

Noun

debacle m or f or n (plural debacles, diminutive debacletje n)

  1. debacle

Spanish

Noun

debacle f (plural debacles)

  1. debacle


English

Etymology

Borrowed from Italian fiasco (bottle, flask), from Late Latin flasca, flascō (bottle, container), from Frankish *flaska (bottle, flask) from Proto-Germanic *flaskǭ (bottle); see flask. “Failure” sense comes through French faire fiasco from Italian theatrical slang far fiasco (literally to make a bottle), of uncertain origin; perhaps from an expression fare il fiasco, meaning to play a game with the forfeit that the loser will buy the next bottle or round of drinks.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fiˈæs.kəʊ/

Noun

fiasco (plural fiascos or fiascoes)

  1. A sudden or unexpected failure.
  2. A ludicrous or humiliating situation. Some effort that went quite wrong.
    Synonym: debacle
  3. A wine bottle in a (usually straw) jacket.

Translations

See also

  • fiasci (hypercorrect plural)
  • fiaschi (Italianate plural; often considered pedantic)

References

  • Concise Oxford Dictionary, s. v. fiasco.
  • Compact Oxford English Dictionary on-line.
  • The Word Detective, Issue of Oct 30, 2001.

Further reading

  • Fiasco (bottle) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • Facios, cafiso, fascio-

Catalan

Etymology

From Italian fiasco

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Valencian) IPA(key): /fiˈas.ko/
  • (Central) IPA(key): /fiˈas.ku/

Noun

fiasco m (plural fiascos)

  1. fiasco (situation)

French

Etymology

Borrowed from Italian fiasco. Doublet of flasque.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fjas.ko/

Noun

fiasco m (plural fiascos)

  1. fiasco (situation)
  2. fiasco (bottle)

Further reading

  • “fiasco” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Italian

Etymology

From Late Latin flasco, flasca (bottle, container), from Old Frankish *flaska (bottle, flask), from Proto-Germanic *flaskǭ (bottle), from Proto-Germanic *flehtaną (to plait), from Proto-Indo-European *plek- (to weave, braid). Akin to Old High German flasca (flask), Old English flasce, flaxe (bottle). More at flask.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfjas.ko/

Noun

fiasco m (plural fiaschi)

  1. flask
  2. fiasco
  3. flagon
  4. (figuratively) debacle, failure

Related terms

  • fiasca
  • fiaschetteria

Descendants

  • English: fiasco
  • French: fiasco
  • Polish: fiasko
  • Portuguese: fiasco
  • Spanish: fiasco

Anagrams

  • cafiso, fascio, fasciò, sfocai, sfocia

Portuguese

Etymology

From Italian fiasco. Doublet of frasco.

Pronunciation

  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /ˈfj.aʃ.ku/
  • Hyphenation: fi‧as‧co

Noun

fiasco m (plural fiascos)

  1. fiasco (ludicrous or humiliating situation)
    Synonym: fracasso

References

See also

  • frasco
  • chasco

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from Italian fiasco. Doublet of frasco.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfjasko/, [ˈfjas.ko]

Noun

fiasco m (plural fiascos)

  1. fiasco
    Synonym: fracaso

Further reading

  • “fiasco” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

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