debris vs junk what difference

what is difference between debris and junk

English

Alternative forms

  • débris

Etymology

Borrowed from French débris, itself from dé- (de-) + bris (broken, crumbled), or from Middle French debriser (to break apart), from Old French debrisier, itself from de- + brisier (to break apart, shatter, bust), from Frankish *bristijan, *bristan, *brestan (to break violently, shatter, bust), from Proto-Germanic *brestaną (to break, burst), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰrest- (to separate, burst). Cognate with Old High German bristan (to break asunder, burst), Old English berstan (to break, shatter, burst). German bersten More at burst.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈdɛbɹiː/, /ˈdeɪbɹiː/
  • (US) IPA(key): /dəˈbɹiː/

Noun

debris (uncountable)

  1. Rubble, wreckage, scattered remains of something destroyed.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:debris
  2. Litter and discarded refuse.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:trash
  3. The ruins of a broken-down structure.
  4. (geology) Large rock fragments left by a melting glacier etc.

Translations

Anagrams

  • B-sider, Brides, biders, birdes, brides, rebids, sibred


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: jŭngk, IPA(key): /dʒʌŋk/
  • Rhymes: -ʌŋk

Etymology 1

From Middle English junke (old cable, rope), probably from Old French jonc (rush), from Latin iuncus (rush). Doublet of junco and juncus.

Noun

junk (uncountable)

  1. Discarded or waste material; rubbish, trash, garbage.
  2. A collection of miscellaneous items of little value.
  3. (slang) Any narcotic drug, especially heroin.
    • 1961, William S. Burroughs, The Soft Machine, page 7
      Trace a line of goose pimples up the thin young arm. Slide the needle in and push the bulb watching the junk hit him all over. Move right in with the shit and suck junk through all the hungry young cells.
  4. (slang) The genitalia, especially a man’s.
    • 2009, Kesha, Tik Tok
      I’m talking about everybody getting crunk, crunk
      Boys tryin’ to touch my junk, junk
      Gonna smack him if he getting too drunk, drunk
  5. (nautical) Salt beef.
    • c. 1851-1852, James Russell Lowell, Leaves from My Journal in Italy and Elsewhere
      My physician has ordered me three pounds of minced salt-junk at every meal .
  6. Pieces of old cable or cordage, used for making gaskets, mats, swabs, etc., and when picked to pieces, forming oakum for filling the seams of ships.
  7. (dated) A fragment of any solid substance; a thick piece; a chunk.
    • 1846-1848, James Russell Lowell, The Biglow Papers
      Dear Uncle Sam pervides fer his,
      An’ gives a good-sized junk to all
  8. (attributive) Material or resources of a kind lacking commercial value.
  9. Nonsense; gibberish
Synonyms
  • See also Thesaurus:trash
  • Thesaurus:cameltoe
  • Thesaurus:male crotch bulge
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

junk (third-person singular simple present junks, present participle junking, simple past and past participle junked)

  1. (transitive, informal) To throw away.
  2. (transitive, informal) To find something for very little money (meaning derived from the term junkshop)
Synonyms
  • (throw away): bin, chuck, chuck away, chuck out, discard, dispose of, ditch, dump, scrap, throw away, throw out, toss, trash
  • See also Thesaurus:junk
Translations

Etymology 2

From Portuguese junco or Dutch jonk (or reinforced), from Malay or Javanese djong, variant of djung, from Old Javanese jong (seagoing ship), ultimately from Chinese .

Noun

junk (plural junks)

  1. (nautical) A Chinese sailing vessel.
Translations

References


Bavarian

Etymology

From Middle High German junc, from Old High German jung.

Adjective

junk

  1. (Sappada) young

References

  • “junk” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle isole linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

Cimbrian

Alternative forms

  • djung, jung, jungh

Etymology

From Middle High German junc, from Old High German jung.

Adjective

junk

  1. (Tredici Comuni) young

References

  • “junk” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle isole linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

North Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian diunk, from Proto-Germanic *dinkwaz, variant of *dankwaz (dark). Compare with German dunkel.

Pronunciation

IPA(key): /jʊŋk/

Adjective

junk

  1. (Sylt) dark

Plautdietsch

Etymology

From Middle Low German and Old Saxon jung

Adjective

junk (comparative jinja)

  1. young

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