decade vs ten what difference

what is difference between decade and ten

English

Etymology

From Middle English [Term?], from Middle French decade, from Late Latin decas ((set of) ten), from Ancient Greek δεκάς (dekás), from δέκα (déka, ten). In reference to a span of ten years, originally a clipping of the phrase decade of years. The word is equivalent to deca- +‎ -ade.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈdɛkeɪd/, /dəˈkeɪd/
  • (General American) enPR: dĕk’ād, dəkād’, IPA(key): /ˈdɛkeɪd/, /dəˈkeɪd/
  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /ˈdɛkəd/ (set of ten prayers in a Rosary)
  • Rhymes: -eɪd
  • Homophone: decayed (one pronunciation)

Noun

decade (plural decades)

  1. A group, set, or series of ten [from 16th c.], particularly:
    1. A period of ten years [from 17th c.], particularly such a period beginning with a year ending in 0 and ending with a year ending in 9. [from 19th c.]
      Synonym: (in some contexts) decennium
    2. A period of ten days, (historical) particularly those in the ancient Egyptian, Coptic, and French Revolutionary calendars. [from 18th c.]
    3. (literary, archaic) A work in ten parts or books, particularly such divisions of Livy’s History of Rome. [from 15th c.]
    4. (Roman Catholicism) A series of prayers counted on a rosary, typically consisting of an Our Father, followed by ten Hail Marys, and concluding with a Glory Be and sometimes the Fatima Prayer.
    5. Any of the sets of ten sequential braille characters with predictable patterns.
    6. (electronics) A set of ten electronic devices used to represent digits.
  2. (electronics) A set of resistors, capacitors, etc. connected so as to provide even increments between one and ten times a base electrical resistance.
  3. (physics, engineering) The interval between any two quantities having a ratio of 10 to 1.

Usage notes

Although a decade may refer to any group of ten years, it often particularly refers to the informal ten-year periods of the calendar whose last digits run from 0 to 9. Some style guides may prefer that decade refers exclusively to such calendar periods while decennium, decennary, &c. refers to ten-year periods in other contexts.

It should be noted that the method of computing a decade is distinguished from the proper computation of centuries and millennia, which run from 1 to 0. The 1st century began with the year 1 and ended with the year 100, but “the Nineties” are the years whose name includes the word ninety, from ’90 to ’99 with all those years with a 9 in the tens place digit.

Coordinate terms

  • (group) monad, duad/dyad, triad, tetrad, pentad, hexad, hebdomad/heptad, ogdoad/octad, ennead/nonad, decad/decade, hendecad, dodecad/duodecade, chiliad

Related terms

  • (adj.): decadal
  • (10-year period; adj.; in some contexts): see decennial

Translations

See also

References

  • “decade, n.”, in OED Online ⁠, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, 1894.

Anagrams

  • deaced

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from French décade (period of ten days), cognate with German Dekade etc. In the sense “period of ten days” influenced by English decade; this meaning is seldom found outside poor translations from English.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˌdeːˈkaː.də/
  • Hyphenation: de‧ca‧de
  • Rhymes: -aːdə

Noun

decade f (plural decades or decaden, diminutive decadetje n)

  1. (historical) a décade, ‘week’ of ten days in the French republican calendar; hence any ten consecutive days
  2. a set of ten book volumes, as part of a larger opus
  3. (uncommon) a decade, period of ten years

Synonyms

  • (ten years): decennium, jaartiental

Descendants

  • Indonesian: dekade

Italian

Etymology

deca- +‎ -ade

Noun

decade f (plural decadi)

  1. a decade, a period of ten days

Related terms

  • deca-
  • decennio (ten years)

Verb

decade

  1. third-person singular present indicative of decadere

Anagrams

  • deceda

Latin

Noun

decāde

  1. ablative singular of decās

References

  • decade in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)

Middle French

Noun

decade f (plural decades)

  1. a series of 10 books

References

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l’ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (decade, supplement)

Romanian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [deˈkade]

Verb

decade

  1. third-person singular present indicative of decădea


English

Etymology

From Middle English ten, tene, from Old English tīen, from Proto-West Germanic *tehun, from Proto-Germanic *tehun, from Proto-Indo-European *déḱm̥.

Cognate with Scots ten, tene (ten), West Frisian tsien (ten), Saterland Frisian tjoon (ten), North Frisian tiin (ten), Dutch tien (ten), German zehn (ten), Norwegian ti (ten), Swedish tio (ten).

Non-Germanic cognates include Albanian dhjetë, Old Armenian տասն (tasn), Lithuanian dešimt, Old Church Slavonic десѧть (desętĭ), Old Breton dec, Old Irish deich, Ancient Greek δέκα (déka), Sanskrit दश (dásá), Old Persian *???????? (*d-θ /daθa/), Latin decem, Tocharian A śäk.

See also teen.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) enPR: tĕn IPA(key): /tɛn/, [tʰɛn]
  • IPA(key): /tɪn/ (pinpen merger)
  • Rhymes: -ɛn, Rhymes: -ɪn (pinpen merger)
  • Homophone: tin (with pin-pen merger)

Numeral

ten

  1. The number occurring after nine and before eleven, represented in Arabic numerals (base ten) as 10 and in Roman numerals as X.

Related terms

  • tenth

Translations

See ten/translations § Numeral.

Noun

ten (countable and uncountable, plural tens)

  1. A set or group with ten elements.
    We divided the chocolates into tens to hand out to Hallowe’en visitors.
  2. (in the plural) An inexact quantity, typically understood to be between 20 and 100.
    Our houses are tens of meters apart, so we don’t have to worry about noise from our neighbours.
    tens of thousands of voters
  3. (countable, card games) A card in a given suit with a value of ten.
  4. (countable) A denomination of currency, such as a banknote, with a value of ten units. See also tenner.
    Can you give me two tens for this twenty?
  5. (countable, US, slang) A perfect specimen, (particularly) a physically attractive person.
  6. (countable, US, slang) A high level of intensity. (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  7. (countable, rowing) The act of rowing ten strokes flat out.
    • 1911, The Cambridge Review (volume 32, page 486)
      At the 1,000-metres post we gave a ten, which raised our lead to 1⅔ lengths; the Belgians were rowing hard, but one felt that they still had plenty of spurting power.
    • 1982, Stanley French, Aspects of Downing history (page 105)
      Morris gave a ten, and an unbelievable surge ran through the boat, one that I had never felt before.

Synonyms

  • Roman numerals: X
  • (currency): tenner

Coordinate terms

  • Previous: nine (9)
  • Next: eleven (11)

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

See also

  • (prefix): deca-, deka-
  • (adjective): decadal, decenary
  • (a set of 10 items): decimate, decimal; decaplet, decuplet (of babies, musical notes, or baryons)
  • (containing 10 items): decenary
  • (related to base-10 numeration): See decimal
  • (period of 10 months): decimestrial
  • (period of 10 years): See decade and decennium
  • (related to a 10-year period): See decadal and decennial
  • (10-year anniversary): See decennial
  • (rule by 10 people): See decemvirate
  • (commander of 10 soldiers): See decener
  • (chief of 10 men in early English law): See tithingman
  • (payment or collection of a 10% tax): See tithe

Anagrams

  • -ent, .NET, ENT, NET, Net, ent, ent-, net

Atong (India)

Etymology

From English ten.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ten/

Numeral

ten (Bengali script তেন)

  1. ten

Synonyms

  • chyigyk
  • dys / das

References

  • van Breugel, Seino. 2015. Atong-English dictionary, second edition. Available online: https://www.academia.edu/487044/Atong_English_Dictionary. Stated in Appendix 2.

Bislama

Etymology

From English ten.

Numeral

ten

  1. ten

Cornish

Noun

ten

  1. Hard mutation of den.
  2. Mixed mutation of den.

Czech

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *tъ, from Proto-Indo-European *só

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈtɛn]

Pronoun

ten m (demonstrative nominative singular masculine animate)

  1. the; this; that

Declension

Derived terms

  • tamten
  • tenhle
  • tentam
  • tento
  • tentýž
  • kdo dřív přijde, ten dřív mele

Further reading

  • ten in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • ten in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Dutch

Etymology

A contraction of te + den.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tɛn/

Contraction

ten

  1. to the, at the (followed by a masculine or neuter word)

Usage notes

ten is part of many fossilized idiomatic expressions. Being derived in part from te, it is followed by the (similarly fossilized) dative case.
ten is commonly used in Dutch family names such as Corrie ten Boom, Bernhard ten Brink, Marti ten Kate, and Simeon ten Holt.

Derived terms

  • ten opzichte van

Related terms

  • ter

Anagrams

  • ent, net

Galician

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tɛŋ/

Verb

ten

  1. third-person singular present indicative of ter
  2. second-person singular imperative of ter

References

  • “ten” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI – ILGA 2006-2013.

Japanese

Romanization

  • Romanization of 天

ten

  1. Rōmaji transcription of てん
  2. Rōmaji transcription of テン

Kabuverdianu

Etymology

From Portuguese ter.

Verb

ten

  1. to have
  2. to possess

Lithuanian

Adverb

ten

  1. there

Lower Sorbian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [tɛn]

Determiner

ten (feminine ta, neuter to, dual tej, plural te)

  1. this

Declension


Middle Dutch

Contraction

ten

  1. Contraction of te den.

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English tīen.

Alternative forms

  • tene, tenne, tien

Pronunciation

  • (Early ME) IPA(key): /teːn/
  • IPA(key): /tɛn/
  • Rhymes: -ɛn

Numeral

ten

  1. ten
Related terms
  • -tene
  • tenthe, tithe
  • -ty
Descendants
  • English: ten
  • Scots: ten
  • Yola: dhen

Etymology 2


From Old English tēon, from Proto-West Germanic *teuhan (to pull, lead), from Proto-Germanic *teuhaną (to draw, lead, bring, pull, help), from Proto-Indo-European *dewk- (to pull, lead).

Alternative forms

  • teen, tene

Verb

ten (third-person singular simple present teth, present participle teende, teynge, first-/third-person singular past indicative tegh, past participle towen)

  1. (transitive) To draw; lead.
  2. (intransitive) To draw away; go; proceed.

Conjugation

Derived terms

  • biteon
  • forten

Etymology 3

From Old Norse tennr, nominative indefinite plural of tǫnn (tooth).

Noun

ten

  1. plural of tothe

Old English

Alternative forms

  • tēne, tȳn, tīen

Etymology

See tien

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /teːn/

Numeral

tēn

  1. (Mercian) ten

References

  1. A. L. Mayhew, M. A. Synopsis of Old English Phonology, 123

Pipil

Etymology

From Proto-Nahuan *teːn-, from Proto-Uto-Aztecan *tïni. Compare Classical Nahuatl tēntli (lips).

Pronunciation

  • (standard) IPA(key): /teːŋ/
  • (Izalco) IPA(key): /teŋ/

Noun

-tēn (plural -tejtēn)

  1. mouth
  2. edge, brim
  3. opening

Derived terms

Relational

-tēn

  1. on the edge, outside

Polish

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *tъ, from Proto-Indo-European *só

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tɛn/

Pronoun

ten m

  1. this (nearby)

Declension

Usage notes

The feminine accusative singular form is only acceptable in colloquial speech, not in formal writing.

Derived terms

  • tamten

Related terms

  • potem, tydzień, przytomny, wtedy, tędy, taki, tutaj

Further reading

  • ten in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian

Etymology

From French teint.

Noun

ten n (plural tenuri)

  1. color of the face

Declension


Scots

Etymology

From Middle English ten

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tɛn/

Numeral

ten

  1. ten

References

  • Andy Eagle, ed., (2016) The Online Scots Dictionary, Scots Online.

Slovak

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *tъ, from Proto-Indo-European *só

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tɛn/

Pronoun

ten m

  1. (demonstrative) this (nearby)

Related terms

  • to

Further reading

  • ten in Slovak dictionaries at slovnik.juls.savba.sk

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈten/, [ˈt̪ẽn]
  • Rhymes: -en

Verb

ten

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of tener.

Sranan Tongo

Etymology

From English time.

Noun

ten

  1. time

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Swedish ten, from Old Norse teinn (sprout, twig, branch).

Noun

ten c

  1. a rod, a stick (of metal or wood)

Declension

See also

  • tenn

Tiang

Noun

ten

  1. woman

Further reading

  • Malcolm Ross, Proto Oceanic and the Austronesian Languages of Western Melanesia, Pacific Linguistics, series C-98 (1988)

Tok Pisin

Etymology

From English ten.

Numeral

ten

  1. ten

Usage notes

Used when counting; see also tenpela.


Turkish

Etymology

From Persian تن(tan).

Noun

ten (definite accusative teni, plural tenler)

  1. skin
  2. body
  3. (dialectal) vulva of a cow

Declension

References

  • ten”, in Türkiye’de halk ağzından derleme sözlüğü [Compilation Dictionary of Popular Speech in Turkey] (in Turkish), Ankara: Türk Dil Kurumu, 1963–1982

Westrobothnian

Etymology

From Old Norse tin, from Proto-Germanic *tiną.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tʰɪːn/, /tʰɪːɳ/
    Rhymes: -ɪ́ːn

Noun

ten n

  1. tin (chemical element)
    joʈ båʈi teɳęɳ

    made out of tin

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial