decant vs effuse what difference

what is difference between decant and effuse

English

Etymology

From French décanter, from Medieval Latin dēcanthāre, from dē- +‎ canthus (beak of a cup or jug).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dəˈkænt/
  • Rhymes: -ænt
  • Hyphenation: de‧cant

Verb

decant (third-person singular simple present decants, present participle decanting, simple past and past participle decanted)

  1. (transitive) To pour off (a liquid) gently, so as not to disturb the sediment.
    • 1908, Michael Faraday, The Chemical History of a Candle
      After washing, the insoluble lime soap is decomposed with hot dilute sulphuric acid. The melted fatty acids thus rise as an oil to the surface, when they are decanted.
  2. (transitive) To pour from one vessel into another.
    to decant wine
  3. (archaic, intransitive) To flow.
    • 1900, Sabine Baring-Gould, A Book of Dartmoor
      Swincombe, formerly Swan-combe, runs to the north of the ridge, and has the sources of its river in the Fox Tor mires and near Childe’s Tomb. It runs north-east, and then abruptly passes north to decant into the West Dart.
  4. (science fiction) To remove a clone from its chamber, vat, or artificial womb.
  5. To rehouse people while their buildings are being refurbished or rebuilt.

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • cadent, canted, cedant, dacent


English

Etymology

Borrowed from Middle French effuser, from Latin effusus, past participle of effundere (to pour out).

Pronunciation

  • (adjective) IPA(key): /ɪˈfjuːs/
  • (verb) IPA(key): /ɪˈfjuːz/

Adjective

effuse (comparative more effuse, superlative most effuse)

  1. Poured out freely; profuse.
    • a. 1677, Isaac Barrow, The Nativity of our Lord tidings of great Joy (sermon)
      So should our joy be very effuse.
  2. Disposed to pour out freely; prodigal.
  3. (botany) Spreading loosely, especially on one side.
  4. (zoology) Having the lips, or edges, of the aperture abruptly spreading, as in certain shells.

Verb

effuse (third-person singular simple present effuses, present participle effusing, simple past and past participle effused)

  1. (transitive) To emit; to give off.
  2. (figuratively) To gush; to be excitedly talkative and enthusiastic about something.
  3. (intransitive) To pour out like a stream or freely; to cause to exude; to shed.
  4. (intransitive) To leak out through a small hole.

Translations

Noun

effuse

  1. (obsolete) effusion; loss

Derived terms

  • effuser

Italian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /efˈfu.ze/
  • Rhymes: -uze

Verb

effuse

  1. third-person singular past historic of effondere

Participle

effuse f

  1. feminine plural of effuso

Latin

Participle

effūse

  1. vocative masculine singular of effūsus

References

  • effuse in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • effuse in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • effuse in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

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