decay vs dilapidate what difference

what is difference between decay and dilapidate

English

Etymology

From Middle English decayen, dekeyen (to decrease, diminish), from Anglo-Norman decaeir (to fall away, decay, decline), from Medieval Latin *dēcadere, restored form of Latin decidere (to fall away, fail, sink, perish), from de (down) + cadere (to fall); compare decadent and decadence.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /dɪˈkeɪ/
  • Rhymes: -eɪ
  • (US) enPR: dē-kāʹ, IPA(key): /di.ˈkeɪ/

Noun

decay (countable and uncountable, plural decays)

  1. The process or result of being gradually decomposed.
  2. A deterioration of condition; loss of status or fortune.
  3. (programming) The situation, in programming languages such as C, where an array loses its type and dimensions and is reduced to a pointer, for example by passing it to a function.

Derived terms

Related terms

  • deciduous

Translations

Verb

decay (third-person singular simple present decays, present participle decaying, simple past and past participle decayed)

  1. (intransitive) To deteriorate, to get worse, to lose strength or health, to decline in quality.
    The pair loved to take pictures in the decaying hospital on forty-third street.
    1. (intransitive, electronics, of storage media or the data on them) To undergo bit rot, that is, gradual degradation.
    2. (intransitive, computing, of software) To undergo software rot, that is, to fail to be updated in a changing environment, so as to eventually become legacy or obsolete.
    3. (intransitive, physics, of a satellite’s orbit) To undergo prolonged reduction in altitude (above the orbited body).
      • 2009, Francis Lyall, Paul B. Larsen, Space Law: A Treatise, page 120:
        Damaged on lift-off, Skylab was left in orbit until its orbit decayed.
  2. (intransitive, of organic material) To rot, to go bad.
    The cat’s body decayed rapidly.
  3. (intransitive, transitive, physics, chemistry, of an unstable atom) To change by undergoing fission, by emitting radiation, or by capturing or losing one or more electrons.
    • 2005, Encyclopedia of Earth Science (edited by Timothy M. Kusky; →ISBN, page 349:
      Uranium decays to radium through a long series of steps with a cumulative half-life of 4.4 billion years.
  4. (intransitive, transitive, physics, of a quantum system) To undergo optical decay, that is, to relax to a less excited state, usually by emitting a photon or phonon.
  5. (intransitive, aviation) Loss of airspeed due to drag.
  6. (transitive) To cause to rot or deteriorate.
    The extreme humidity decayed the wooden sculptures in the museum’s collection in a matter of years.
  7. (programming, intransitive) Of an array: to lose its type and dimensions and be reduced to a pointer, for example when passed to a function.

Translations

Further reading

  • decay in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • decay in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • Dacey


English

Etymology

From Latin dilapidātus, past participle of dilapidō (I destroy with stones), from dis (intensifier) + lapidō (I stone), from lapis (stone)

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /dɪˈlæp.ɪ.deɪt/, /dəˈlæp.ə.deɪt/

Verb

dilapidate (third-person singular simple present dilapidates, present participle dilapidating, simple past and past participle dilapidated)

  1. (transitive) To cause to become ruined or put into disrepair.
    • If the bishop, parson, or vicar, etc., dilapidates the buildings, or cuts down the timber of the patrimony []
    • 1883, George Bernard Shaw, An Unsocial Socialist, chapter VI
      In the last days of autumn he had whitewashed the chalet, painted the doors, windows, and veranda, repaired the roof and interior, and improved the place so much that the landlord had warned him that the rent would be raised at the expiration of his twelvemonth’s tenancy, remarking that a tenant could not reasonably expect to have a pretty, rain-tight dwelling-house for the same money as a hardly habitable ruin. Smilash had immediately promised to dilapidate it to its former state at the end of the year.
  2. (transitive, figuratively) To squander or waste.
    • 1692, Anthony Wood, Athenae Oxonienses
      The patrimony of the bishopric of Oxon was much dilapidated.
  3. (intransitive, archaic) To fall into ruin or disuse.

Related terms

  • lapidate

Translations


Italian

Verb

dilapidate

  1. inflection of dilapidare:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative
  2. feminine plural of dilapidato

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