Decedents vs Deceased what difference

what is difference between Decedents and Deceased

English

Noun

decedents

  1. plural of decedent


English

Etymology

From decease +‎ -ed, from Middle English deceas via Old French [Term?], from Latin dēcessus (departure), equivalent to dēced-, variation of dēcēdō, dēcēdere (to go away).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /dɪˈsiːst/
  • (US) enPR: dē-sēst’ IPA(key): /diˈsist/
  • (Canada) IPA(key): /diˈsist/, /diˈsizd/, /dɪˈsizd/
  • (Nigeria) IPA(key): /dɪˈzizd/
  • Homophone: diseased (Nigeria)
  • Rhymes: -iːst

Adjective

deceased (not comparable)

  1. No longer alive; dead.
    • Monty Python
  2. Belonging to the dead.
  3. (law) One who has died. In property law, the alternate term decedent is generally used. In criminal law, “the deceased” refers to the victim of a homicide.

Usage notes

  • Not to be confused with diseased (affected with or suffering from disease).

Synonyms

  • (no longer alive): asleep (euphemistic), at peace (euphemistic), at rest (euphemistic), dead, departed (euphemistic), late, gone (euphemistic)

Translations

Noun

deceased (plural deceased or deceaseds)

  1. A dead person.
    The deceased was interred in his local churchyard.
    a memorial to the deceased of two World Wars
  2. (law) One who has died. In property law, the alternate term decedent is generally used in US English. In criminal law, “the deceased” refers to the victim of a homicide.

Usage notes

Deceased or decedent is commonly used in legal and journalistic settings. Departed is most commonly used in religious settings.

Synonyms

  • (dead person): decedent, departed, late
  • (plural: dead people): decedents, departed

Translations


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