decipher vs trace what difference

what is difference between decipher and trace

English

Alternative forms

  • decypher

Etymology

As decypher, but not retaining the y from the Old French etyma of cipher (cyfre, cyffre); the i spelling tends to be preferred etymologically, being consistent with its cognates, the French déchiffrer and the Italian decifrare, and with their common ancestor, the Medieval Latin cifra, cifera, ciphra.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /dɪˈsaɪfə(ɹ)/
  • Rhymes: -aɪfə(ɹ)

Verb

decipher (third-person singular simple present deciphers, present participle deciphering, simple past and past participle deciphered)

  1. (transitive) To decode or decrypt a code or cipher to plain text.
  2. (transitive) To read text that is almost illegible or obscure.
  3. (transitive) To find a solution to a problem.

Derived terms

Related terms

  • decrypt

Translations

Noun

decipher (plural deciphers)

  1. A decipherment; a decoding.
    • 1837, Arthur Wellesley Duke of Wellington, John Gurwood, The Dispatches of Field Marshall the Duke of Wellington, K.G.
      I enclose a letter which I received yesterday evening from the Marques de Monsalud, containing the decipher of a letter from the King to the Comte d’Erlon. I wish that the Marques had sent the ciphered letter here []

Anagrams

  • ciphered


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tɹeɪs/, [tʃɹeɪs]
  • Rhymes: -eɪs

Etymology 1

From Middle English trace, traas, from Old French trace (an outline, track, trace), from the verb (see below).

Noun

trace (countable and uncountable, plural traces)

  1. An act of tracing.
  2. An enquiry sent out for a missing article, such as a letter or an express package.
  3. A mark left as a sign of passage of a person or animal.
  4. A residue of some substance or material.
  5. A very small amount.
  6. (electronics) A current-carrying conductive pathway on a printed circuit board.
  7. An informal road or prominent path in an arid area.
  8. One of two straps, chains, or ropes of a harness, extending from the collar or breastplate to a whippletree attached to a vehicle or thing to be drawn; a tug.
  9. (engineering) A connecting bar or rod, pivoted at each end to the end of another piece, for transmitting motion, especially from one plane to another; specifically, such a piece in an organ stop action to transmit motion from the trundle to the lever actuating the stop slider.
  10. (fortification) The ground plan of a work or works.
  11. (geometry) The intersection of a plane of projection, or an original plane, with a coordinate plane.
  12. (mathematics) The sum of the diagonal elements of a square matrix.
  13. (grammar) An empty category occupying a position in the syntactic structure from which something has been moved, used to explain constructions such as wh-movement and the passive.
Synonyms
  • (mark left as a sign of passage of a person or animal): track, trail
  • (small amount): see also Thesaurus:modicum.
Derived terms
  • downtrace, uptrace
  • without trace, without a trace
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English tracen, from Old French tracer, trasser (to delineate, score, trace”, also, “to follow, pursue), probably a conflation of Vulgar Latin *tractiō (to delineate, score, trace), from Latin trahere (to draw); and Old French traquer (to chase, hunt, pursue), from trac (a track, trace), from Middle Dutch treck, treke (a drawing, draft, delineation, feature, expedition). More at track.

Verb

trace (third-person singular simple present traces, present participle tracing, simple past and past participle traced)

  1. (transitive) To follow the trail of.
    • c. 1792, William Cowper, “On a Similar Occasion for the Year 1792”
      Happy the mortal, who has traced effects
      To their first cause
  2. To follow the history of.
    • 1684-1690, Thomas Burnet, Sacred Theory of the Earth
      You may trace the deluge quite round the globe.
  3. (transitive) To draw or sketch lightly or with care.
  4. (transitive) To copy onto a sheet of paper superimposed over the original, by drawing over its lines.
  5. (transitive, obsolete) To copy; to imitate.
    • 1647, John Denham, To Sir Richard Fanshaw
      That servile path thou nobly dost decline, / Of tracing word by word, and line by line.
  6. (intransitive, obsolete) To walk; to go; to travel.
  7. (transitive, obsolete) To walk over; to pass through; to traverse.
  8. (computing, transitive) To follow the execution of the program by making it to stop after every instruction, or by making it print a message after every step.
Related terms
  • tracing
Translations

Anagrams

  • Carte, Cater, acter, caret, carte, cater, crate, creat, react, recta, reäct

French

Etymology

From the verb tracer.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tʁas/
  • Rhymes: -as

Noun

trace f (plural traces)

  1. trace
  2. track
  3. (mathematics) trace

Derived terms

  • trace de freinage

Verb

trace

  1. first-person singular present indicative of tracer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of tracer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of tracer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of tracer
  5. second-person singular imperative of tracer

Further reading

  • “trace” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • caret, carte, créât, écart, terça

Italian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈtra.t͡ʃe/
  • Hyphenation: trà‧ce

Etymology 1

From Latin thrācem, accusative form of thrāx, from Ancient Greek Θρᾷξ (Thrâix).

Adjective

trace (plural traci)

  1. (literary) Thracian

Noun

trace m (plural traci)

  1. (historical) a person from or an inhabitant of Thrace
    Synonym: tracio

Noun

trace m (uncountable)

  1. the Thracian language
Related terms
  • tracio
  • Tracia

Etymology 2

From Latin thraecem, accusative form of thraex, from Ancient Greek Θρᾷξ (Thrâix).

Noun

trace m (plural traci)

  1. (historical, Ancient Rome) a gladiator bearing Thracian equipment

Anagrams

  • -crate, Creta, carte, certa, cetra, creta, tacer

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old French trace, from tracer, tracier.

Alternative forms

  • traas, trase

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈtraːs(ə)/

Noun

trace (plural traces) (mostly Late ME)

  1. A trail, track or road; a pathway or route:
    1. An track that isn’t demarcated; an informal pathway.
    2. A trace; a trail of evidence left of something’s presence.
  2. One’s lifepath or decisions; one’s chosen actions.
  3. Stepping or movement of feet, especially during dancing.
  4. (rare, heraldry) A straight mark.
Derived terms
  • tracen
  • tracyng
Descendants
  • English: trace
  • Scots: trace
  • Yola: threesh
References
  • “trāce, n.(1).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-09-18.

Etymology 2

Verb

trace

  1. Alternative form of tracen

Old French

Etymology

From the verb tracier, tracer.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈtra.t͡sə/

Noun

trace f (oblique plural traces, nominative singular trace, nominative plural traces)

  1. trace (markings showing where one has been)

Descendants

  • Middle English: trace
    • English: trace
  • French: trace

Spanish

Verb

trace

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of trazar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of trazar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of trazar.

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