decry vs reprobate what difference

what is difference between decry and reprobate

English

Etymology

From Old French descrier (to shout), from des- (out, away, off, down) + crier (to cry); see cry.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dɪˈkɹaɪ/
  • Rhymes: -aɪ

Verb

decry (third-person singular simple present decries, present participle decrying, simple past and past participle decried)

  1. (transitive) To denounce as harmful.
    • 1970, Alvin Toffler, Future Shock, Bantam Books, pg. 99:
      All of us seem to need some totalistic relationships in our lives. But to decry the fact that we cannot have only such relationships is nonsense.
    • 1970, Alvin Toffler, Future Shock, Bantam Books, pg. 474:
      While decrying bureaucracy and demanding participatory democracy they, themselves, frequently attempt to manipulate the very group of workers, blacks or students on whose behalf they demand participation.
  2. (transitive) To blame for ills.

Translations

References

  • Chambers’s Etymological Dictionary, 1896, p. 114
  • decry in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • decry in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • decry at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • cedry, cyder


English

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Latin reprobatus (disapproved, rejected, condemned), past participle of reprobare.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɹɛpɹəbət/

Adjective

reprobate (comparative more reprobate, superlative most reprobate)

  1. (rare) Rejected; cast off as worthless.
    • Reprobate silver shall men call them, because the Lord hath rejected them.
  2. Rejected by God; damned, sinful.
  3. Immoral, having no religious or principled character.
    The reprobate criminal sneered at me.
Translations

Noun

reprobate (plural reprobates)

  1. One rejected by God; a sinful person.
  2. An individual with low morals or principles.
    • c. 1603, Walter Raleigh, Apology for the Voyage to Guiana
      I acknowledge myself for a reprobate, a villain, a traitor to the king.
    • 1920, Herman Cyril McNeile, Bulldog Drummond Chapter 1
      “Good morning, Mrs. Denny,” he said. “Wherefore this worried look on your face? Has that reprobate James been misbehaving himself?”
Related terms
  • depraved
Translations

Etymology 2

Borrowed from Latin reprobare, reprobatus. Doublet of reprove.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɹɛpɹəbeɪt/

Verb

reprobate (third-person singular simple present reprobates, present participle reprobating, simple past and past participle reprobated)

  1. To have strong disapproval of something; to reprove; to condemn.
  2. Of God: to abandon or reject, to deny eternal bliss.
  3. To refuse, set aside.
Translations

Anagrams

  • perborate

Latin

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /re.proˈbaː.te/, [ɾɛpɾɔˈbäːt̪ɛ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /re.proˈba.te/, [rɛprɔˈbɑːt̪ɛ]

Verb

reprobāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of reprobō

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